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The Beyerdynamic DT880 Discussion thread - Page 303

post #4531 of 8358

There's certainly nothing wrong with EQ. I always love to hear the arguments people make against it, usually centered around signal purity, phase distortion and other artifacts that they claim to be able to hear. The argument that always stymies them is that virtually all recorded music involves EQ in at least some stage of the signal path. It's funny how nobody claims to be able to hear it there1,2.

 

EQ is first and foremost a tool. The name implies its original intended function, which is to compensate for factors that interact with a signal during performance or recording (e.g. room reflections, generational loss, etc.). Additionally, it's used to sculpt portions of a mix so that they fit together better, or else to create interesting effects. Beyond that, it can be used client-side (e.g. room calibration), or, as many people use it, as a means of imparting a sonic flavor that they happen to like.

 

All of these are valid applications, and if you like the results, don't let anybody tell you different.

 

1 Though there is a minor niche for music that is recorded with bear mics and without any processing. This is more of a live performance thing, though.

 

2. I'm of course discounting the usual "studios have much better (read: expensive) equipment" cop out.

post #4532 of 8358

My main argument with EQ is that it tempts people to fiddle. If all recordings were the same, fine: you could settle on one setting and leave it forever. Unfortunately recordings vary wildly, so there's the constant temptation to just go up 2db on the 2khz slider, down a touch at 500hz, maybe just a tweak more bass on this one, but definitely bypass on this one...and so on. Fiddling is the bane of hi-fi and music listening. Of course, if you'd rather fiddle than listen to music that's fine. Personally I've made a career out of fiddling--with cartridge alignment, tone arm isolation, turntable mats, speaker crossovers, driver time alignment...what have you--which is probably why I'm so wary of anything that tempts me to continue fiddling.

 

Of course, none of that has anything to do with those who just want to compensate for one particular (mild) aberration and leave it at that.

post #4533 of 8358

I can see that argument. I use EQ in precisely the way you describe in your last sentence. The main distinction is that I'm using it to affect a global calibration rather than to enhance specific tracks.

 

That said, there are some really poor mastering jobs out there. I avoid purposely EQ'ing individual tracks unless absolutely necessary (which is very, very rarely), but there are a few instances in my library where obvious mastering mistakes and/or extremely poor judgment make the music almost unlistenable. One of these is a bizarre upper midrange bump that was for some reason applied globally across an entire album. I can only think they were trying to make the music sound like an old recording. Careful listening and consultation of spectrograms has allowed me to get a pretty good idea what exactly they did, and setting up a compensation curve reveals a pretty standard-sounding recording.

post #4534 of 8358
I think eq is fine as long as it's not an impression/ review, which can skew someone's decision. as long as there's a full disclosure, I'm alright with it. Don't use it myself, one less thing for me to worry about. That and I'm forgetful so I forget my settings a lot when I did use it.
post #4535 of 8358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argyris View Post
 

I can see that argument. I use EQ in precisely the way you describe in your last sentence. The main distinction is that I'm using it to affect a global calibration rather than to enhance specific tracks.

 

 

Actually the way I used to use EQ was to put individual recordings through a 10 band equaliser to make a permanent copy, first onto cassette and later minidisc (still do that). That way I've compensated for the problem but can never be tempted to change the settings. I've made many unlistenable LPs and CDs acceptable that way.

post #4536 of 8358
Quote:
Originally Posted by wahsmoh View Post
 

EQs... oh man I love my EQ, in fact I abuse it too much. I like the idea of a "fun" sound signature and find this works for nearly any genre with the exception of a few I prefer it completely flat.

 

I know some Head-fi'ers are going to laugh but I compensate for bass bleed by adding more treble because I enjoy bright. So is it really wrong to EQ a headphone to what your sound preference is?

 

 

Hey man, ain't nuthin' wrong with a little EQ!

Ain't nuthin' wrong with bein' a treblehead either.

post #4537 of 8358

I still eq every headphone I own [except thew1000x] for about +3 db bass boost at 100hrz when ever I listen to EDM. For FUN genres eq away, but I like hearing the different style of each mastering, yea some Artists Master there songs with a little more bass, [they EQ during the mastering] and I like to preserve the color that they feel was needed

 

but I got no hate for any one who eq's ;3 I just happen to not like it outside of edm :3, 

post #4538 of 8358

Listening to the DT880 now. Just got it this week and massively enjoying its soundstage and neutral sound for my Dark Knight Rises soundtrack :)

post #4539 of 8358

The soundstage was the most obvious improvement initially over all the other headphones I'd tried up to that point and remains one of my favorite things about the DT880. The thing that impresses me most about it is how well rounded it is. I've heard those w-i-d-e presentations with no depth, but the DT880 has none of that.

post #4540 of 8358

also

HOLY FREAKING CRAP YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Chill Hop on Di.fm is playing NUJABES. That makes me so very happy AND it confirms that Chill Hop is indeed Nu Jazz [different name same genre] 

 

In addition, I'm finding that my Balanced Db1 has some SERIOUSLY DEEP sound. Listening to some Nu Jazz tracks, and every couple of songs I'll hear something from behind me :O and it's rom the SONG so Piture my with a pair of dt 880s swingin my head around in the middle of my Programming class >.>

post #4541 of 8358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Stoneheart View Post

Listening to the DT880 now. Just got it this week and massively enjoying its soundstage and neutral sound for my Dark Knight Rises soundtrack smily_headphones1.gif

Dark Knight has a great soundtrack too as well as Inception and Man of Steel. Glad to see you're enjoying the 880s, are you still sticking with the HE-400s as your other set?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argyris View Post

The soundstage was the most obvious improvement initially over all the other headphones I'd tried up to that point and remains one of my favorite things about the DT880. The thing that impresses me most about it is how well rounded it is. I've heard those w-i-d-e presentations with no depth, but the DT880 has none of that.
+1; That's why I'm keeping the 880s around. They just do a lot of things right for me. I don't have time to really listen when I'm at home, busy with house work and still slowly unpacking everything from the move, but when I do... I'll definitely do it on the 880s w/ my little O2. smily_headphones1.gif
Edited by MrEleventy - 9/12/13 at 6:50am
post #4542 of 8358

Hi!guys!

 

I was considering to buy a dt880(600), but I only have a musical fidelity v-can as amp. Will it work here? capable?modest?or disastrous?Thanks!

post #4543 of 8358
Quote:
Originally Posted by super39 View Post
 

Hi!guys!

 

I was considering to buy a dt880(600), but I only have a musical fidelity v-can as amp. Will it work here? capable?modest?or disastrous?Thanks!

 

DO not buy the 600 ohm versiom UNLESS you are planning to use them with a OTL Tube [not a hybrid] OR you plan to balance them and use with a fully balanced rig

 

So Buy the Pro 250 ohm and save your self some money! Plus I find the Pro 250 ohm to be more comfortable :3 

post #4544 of 8358
Hate coiled cords... biggrin.gif I found that the 880/600 and an O2 worked well together but that was months ago. I might change my mind when I get it setup. Not ideal but it still sounded good.
post #4545 of 8358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mshenay View Post
 

 

DO not buy the 600 ohm versiom UNLESS you are planning to use them with a OTL Tube [not a hybrid] OR you plan to balance them and use with a fully balanced rig

 

So Buy the Pro 250 ohm and save your self some money! Plus I find the Pro 250 ohm to be more comfortable :3 

 

Thanx! and by the way, are there any significant differences concerning sound quality between the various models(32,250,600), and between pro and normal ones?! because seems normal ones are more expensive. 

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