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The Beyerdynamic DT880 Appreciation / Discussion thread - Page 137

post #2041 of 7019

No, but 600 ohm dynamics like our beloved 880/600 don't really require massive amounts of power, they just need higher voltage. I think the PB2 is overkill for a portable amp for these phones. Plus you'd need to re-terminate/re-wire to get the full voltage swing. I don't think it's necessary when there are so many good single ended portables out there (the ALO Continental, for instance is a beautiful pairing with the 880/600). 

post #2042 of 7019
Quote:
Originally Posted by bixby View Post

what is the 332 you are referring to, and how could meters somewhere measure how many decibels is being presented to your ears or are you using a sound pressure meter pressed against an open cup? Are you using any eq,? Could any of your sources be passing a large amount of dc that the amp is reproducing at the headphones? Not sure but you may wish to see if there is a method to measure for dc at the headphone output of the amp.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

 

Czedipy:

 

Check to see if there is some DC offset on the output of your source.

If you are using a 332 I do not think you will see any DC offset on the output of the 332 as I understand that the 332 uses coupling capacitors on the output to block DC.

 

OTOH, the 332 may or may not have a capacitor on the input to block DC, and if DC is present on the input it will change the bias points of the input tubes.

 

Maybe you just don't like closed and semi closed headphone.

Do you own any closed (sealed) headphones?

 

I'm using a fairly basic source powered through usb -- could dc output still be an issue here?
I made a mistake, I meant to say I'm using the darkvoice 336.
Regarding the dB reading: I was trying to be more explicit that I don't listen to too terribly loud of volumes, as that's a solution raised in another thread I found on the board.
I originally wasn't using EQ, but I've tried eqing down the trouble as suggested on these boards.
I do have have closed headphones, and I don't have any problems with them. This includes running them through the same amp.

And again, I appreciate that you guys have given my problem your attention.

Edited by czedipy - 8/25/12 at 12:30am
post #2043 of 7019
Quote:
Originally Posted by czedipy View Post
 


Now the quoting function does not seem to work...........hmmm.

 

I re-read your post and can only think you have some low bass trying to be reproduced somewhere.  You do not identify your source, computer, ipod, what is it and can you swap it out for another source?

 

That may tell you if you have a problem there.  If not then it may be your amp.  I would send an email to Darkvoice and describe your problem and see if there is any way to measure the outputs with a voltmeter to see if there is a problem.

 

Sorry I cannot be of more help.

post #2044 of 7019

I don't own a pair, but I'm wondering how does it fair with long term use?

any listening fatigue after a while of use?

Sorry If this is a wrong place to post this.I am just thinking about buying pair for work.

post #2045 of 7019

Well, fatigue is of course somewhat relative to the individual. I would consider myself somebody who is moderately sensitive to factors that lead to fatigue. Another consideration is that fatigue is also dependent on the source material, to an extent anyway. If you listen to very hot recordings (meaning mastered loud and with little dynamics) it would be almost impossible to not experience some degree of fatigue from the music alone. A good example of this from my personal experience is the latest Smashing Pumpkins album, Zeitgeist. Brilliant music, however it is recorded so loud and with no dynamics left, that it certainly is a fatiguing album to listen to.

 

In general, a headphone that is more forward, and treble strong will only increase the rate at which fatigue sets in, or at least that is my experience and understanding of the situation. When I was a Grado owner I loved the right-there feel, but eventually I need a break from that signature as it was fatiguing for me to listen to for any length of time. The 880s are certainly moving toward the brighter side of presentation, however, for me they stop short of crossing into the hyper-detailed, bright presentation that would cause me to find them fatiguing. I can listen to them for long enough periods of time and not feel the need for a break, of course that is also in part due to the fact that I tend to listen to less hot recordings most of the time.

 

So the long and short of it for me is that no, the 880s strike a good balance between engaging you and presenting plenty of detail, while not being fatiguing. Your perception may vary. I'm sure others will chime in and offer their thoughts. Good luck.


Edited by Sonic Defender - 8/28/12 at 7:56am
post #2046 of 7019

Thanks for the help/insight of the product sonic.

post #2047 of 7019

Tons of great replies, thank you for your input. I have to an almost certainty decided upon the Valhalla (WA3 is slightly above my price range and LD MK IV has only a 1yr warranty). I have just had couple questions: Since the Valhalla is a tube up, how would I be able to tell the tubes are starting to wear out and in need of replacement? Also how do tube amps deal with music categories such metal or electronic (assume good source material)? Would a solid state such as Asgard be better for that kind of music or are tubes more versatile? 

post #2048 of 7019

I used my Valhalla with plenty of metal, well heavy prog rock, and lots of electronica. I like the every so slight harmonic warmth the tubes added so for me this was a plus. The Valhalla is a great performing entry level tube amp and really worth considering. I don't think there is an exact way of knowing when your tubes are going beyond an audible decline in sonic performance. Perhaps others with more tube experience might give you their input as I sold my Valhalla (wish I didn't have to) only a year in and the tubes were pristine as I am a light user. I rarely have more than an hour at a time to listen to music. Seriously, the Valhalla is a nice amp and it plays really well with high ohm headphones.

 

They also seem to hold their value well so if you don't love it you can sell it and try something new. Good luck.

post #2049 of 7019

How can you tell if your tubes are too old, end of life, exceeded useful lifespan, etc.:

 

IF you had access to a tube tester, you could test them after a few years.

 

OR:

Take a look at the typical lifespan of the tube you are using (should be in the tube spec sheet), then extrapolate lifespan from how much you think you will use the tubes.

 

OR:

Try comparing your older, used tubes with new  tubes from time to time.

If the old tubes are at end of life they will sound "deader" and somewhat muffled, lifeless.

 

They may also get microphonic, but you can get new tubes that are microphonic too.

 

Anyone else have any suggestions?

 

Personally, I do so much tube rolling that I don't worry about it.


Edited by Chris J - 9/3/12 at 8:02am
post #2050 of 7019

Yo,

 

The Valhalla is a good amp and is excellent with high impedance headphones. It makes the DT880 sing. People say it sounds good with the K701 and I have to say it doesn't at all and should not be considered for the K701.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Defender View Post

I used my Valhalla with plenty of metal, well heavy prog rock, and lots of electronica. I like the every so slight harmonic warmth the tubes added so for me this was a plus. The Valhalla is a great performing entry level tube amp and really worth considering. I don't think there is an exact way of knowing when your tubes are going beyond an audible decline in sonic performance. Perhaps others with more tube experience might give you their input as I sold my Valhalla (wish I didn't have to) only a year in and the tubes were pristine as I am a light user. I rarely have more than an hour at a time to listen to music. Seriously, the Valhalla is a nice amp and it plays really well with high ohm headphones.

 

They also seem to hold their value well so if you don't love it you can sell it and try something new. Good luck.

post #2051 of 7019

For sure it does Zombie_X, I loved the Valhalla 880 600ohm combination. It was a very musical pairing and handled all the genres well in my opinion. The head-fi member I sold my Valhalla to has paired it with a Bifrost DAC and HD 650s and just loves the combination.

post #2052 of 7019

I want to share something. It's been something I've been doing for a very long time, and many times with very good results. What I do is take a frequency response graph from headroom of my own headphone, and then of some other headphone, and compare the graphs, after which I EQ my headphones to fit the frequency response of the other headphones and therefore sound similar to them. Of course, this is not accurate, I cant change the response of the driver, but I can give certain headphones a flavor of some other headphone out there. I did it with many headphones, and I find the DT880's to be best at it, they react so well to EQ'ing,  as they're very neutral in stock form, and have extremely good extension in both ways.

 

For example, if I were to EQ DT880's to "sound" like Grado RS1's, I'd input this data into the Graphic Equalizer plugin for Foobar2000, I find its the best EQ i've tried so far for Foobar:

 

Try it! :P

 

Surprisingly, I find the DT880's to sound much better with this EQ than stock with classical, acoustic or vocal music, even jazz. Bass extension doesn't suffer nearly as much as this data would suggest, in fact bass sounds nicer, faster and more textured,   upper mids are much more forward, bass has more clarity, overall sound is somehow more controlled and clear. I listened to the entire Govi - Mosaico album at once with this EQ, it just sounds so good, then I turned the EQ off, and headphones sounded horrible, literally. Dull, boomy, lifeless, muddy, just bad.

 

 I did it first with HD650's to "turn them" into HD600's. Then I did it with DT880's to turn them into DT990's. Both times it worked very well, of course because we're talking about virtually identical headphones, but I didn't expect for headphones to sound so good tuned to "sound like" Grado's. :P


Edited by derbigpr - 9/7/12 at 10:34am
post #2053 of 7019

DT880's, being paired with a tube-amp do not need any EQ. If you don't like this sound, change the headphone. Same goes to HD650's and K701. On this level of fidelity, EQ-ing isn't a good idea. Believe me, I had tones on experience with EQ. It works out during burn-in period, but after 200 hours , when you turn your EQ off, the stock sound makes you happier. 


Edited by AlexRoma - 9/9/12 at 11:27am
post #2054 of 7019
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexRoma View Post

DT880's, being paired with a tube-amp do not need any EQ. If you don't like this sound, change the headphone. Same goes to HD650's and K701. On this level of fidelity, EQ-ing isn't a good idea. Believe me, I had tones on experience with EQ. It works out during burn-in period, but after 200 hours , when you turn your EQ off, the stock sound makes you happier. 

 

TRUTH!!!

post #2055 of 7019
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexRoma View Post

DT880's, being paired with a tube-amp do not need any EQ. If you don't like this sound, change the headphone. Same goes to HD650's and K701. On this level of fidelity, EQ-ing isn't a good idea. Believe me, I had tones on experience with EQ. It works out during burn-in period, but after 200 hours , when you turn your EQ off, the stock sound makes you happier. 

 

 

 

I think you're doing the EQ-ing wrong then. :P

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