Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Gear-Fi: Non-Audio Gear and Gadgets › Shopping for a new laptop
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shopping for a new laptop - Page 4

post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vayate View Post
they're not going to sic the lawyers on you for building a hackintosh as long as you're not costing Apple millions of dollars.
I am aware of this. I was pointing out the legality since it was offered as an advice, and what I've generally found is that it's usually bad karma to give advice to do something illegal, regardless whether you'll end up in deep **** or not.

Anyways, returning to the original question at hand. I would really suggest the OP to step up to 17" or downsize to 13.". Standard notebook keyboards just don't cut it unless you get the full sized keyboard with numpad on some 17" models. I'd use usb keyboard for anything else. I currently have a 15" laptop and really wished I went with 17" like I did before, or try 12 or 13" for more portability.
post #47 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
Well, he asked for a '"PC".
I have tried to argue for the fact that a Mac is also a PC (Personal Computer), but given up and concluding that with "PC" they mean a general IBM computer running MS Windows. Aka, made by Dell, Lenovo, HP, Compaq, ... and not Apple.
Most Mac-fans may argue that the Mac now runs Windows so it is a "PC" too with the advantage of OS X, but I have to disagree with this right across the board, from the 'Pro' desktops to the 'Pro' laptops. It depends on what you're wanting but the driver support / true BIOS compatibility just is not there, and what you're doing on a Mac if you bought it to run Windows productively is to be running in effect a badly put together DIY.


Ironically or intentionally by Apple, I'm not sure but this might reinforce the then-false feeling that OS X is superior for a switcher, but since I run similar kit side by side with the Apples I know that I have far fewer Windows issues with non-Apple gear. It is perhaps unsurprising how many people run Macs in a Windows environment for production duties and consider it tolerable for their work, while retreating to a supposedly 'better' OS X partition at the end of the day... and that it never enters their minds that the Windows environment on a Mac is worse than every other comparable machine you can purchase.


OS X is about as crash-free as a comparable (in terms of price) and supported top-drawer Vista installs from the likes of Lenovo (X/T/W), HP (Elitebook) and Dell (Latitude / Precision)... and to a slightly lesser extent, Sony. If you're getting heavily biased results in one way or another, you're doing something wrong.
post #48 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by bangraman View Post
Most Mac-fans may argue that the Mac now runs Windows so it is a "PC" too with the advantage of OS X, but I have to disagree with this right across the board, from the 'Pro' desktops to the 'Pro' laptops.
The definition of the word PC is what makes the difference.
* Personal Computer. "General-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and original sales price make it useful for individuals".
* IBM Personal Computer. "The original version and progenitor of the IBM PC compatible hardware platform". Running a PC-Dos based OS, aka MS Windows.

We don't need to take the discussion here. But its a fact that we don't agree what is meant by the word!
post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
The definition of the word PC is what makes the difference.
* Personal Computer. "General-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and original sales price make it useful for individuals".
* IBM Personal Computer. "The original version and progenitor of the IBM PC compatible hardware platform". Running a PC-Dos based OS, aka MS Windows.
And thus macs fail on both accounts.
Sorry just couldn't resist, they always look too expensive for me to try
post #50 of 52
It may be 4 pages in, but I think I'll throw my 2 cents in as well. I've used pretty much all the laptops out there, except for HP and Gateway. I'd make sure you like the keyboard and touchpad of the model you're interested in. This can vary within a manufacturers offerings. I'd also look online and make sure the particular model you want doesn't have any known major issues.

As far as individual brands go, I'm turned off of Toshiba because the one I owned had 2 LCDs and an optical drive fail within 2 years. It was also pretty cheap and plasticy feeling.... maybe it just couldn't take a lot of portable use, though I never abused it. I have 3 Sonys in the family now, and they certainly feel much more solid and substantial. I am a bit wary of Sony's driver support though- they have Intel 945 graphics drivers to download for my laptop, which has the 965 chipset! It's been like this for the almost 2 years I've owned this laptop. Sonys also come with a lot of bloatware.

In closing, I think I'd buy a cheap Dell were I to do it again. My laptops were provided by an employer and I had no say in the purchase. You can get a well specced Dell for $5-600, and even if it were to die an early death, you could get a new, up-to-date one and still come out ahead for the same price as one Sony or Thinkpad. The cheap Dell Inspirons and Vostros (same thing I believe) are ugly, but I don't care about that.
post #51 of 52
I just replaced my first gen MacBook Pro with a Lenovo T400 with a 2.8Ghz, the "high nit" screen, all the bells and whistles for about $1200 (sale and student discount). I'm very happy with it. It's a tad smaller than the MBP, so it's easier to carry, the price is excellent. The amount of computer I have is top notch. There is no native optical out, if you really want it, you can purchase a docking station with it. They are very solid in build, have drain holes built in (I always have coffee around). As far as laptops go, there seem to be three camps. Mac, Thinkpads and everybody else. I won't say which one is better than the other it's subjective anyway. I've used both recently, and I chose the Thinkpad and windows/Linux for the preference of certain programs and hardware that is available. Also, the idea that I actually bring my laptop everywhere, so durability is a big thing for me. If your thinking of getting a Lenovo, it's a good buy. I recommend upgrading your RAM and HDD on your own no matter what you decide to get though. (much more economical that way, plus you can get a 500GB HD for about $99)
post #52 of 52
I would recommend the Lenovos, (X or T series) too. The laptops are solidly built. I would also look at the HP Elitebook series.

Personally, I would keep away from Sony Vaio. The laptops are aesthetically very pleasing, but I really do not think highly about their build quality and the premium they charge.

I think Lenovo is the best bang for the buck.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Gear-Fi: Non-Audio Gear and Gadgets › Shopping for a new laptop