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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 7

post #91 of 400
zkool - what do you use when you need to ground stuff? Do you have a metal base plate or something? Also, what knob is that? Finally, did you rip your pieces down with a table saw before making your 45 degree cuts? Or can you buy the poplar like that from home depot?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
There were saw dusts flying in the workshop today when I started cutting away some wood for my CTH case.
post #92 of 400
Mine is a little older but I thought I would add it.







post #93 of 400
Nice work James

I really like the top plate design.
post #94 of 400
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by elliot42 View Post
I put the boards for the chipamp together the other night and just have to wire it up to have a listen. I'll probably be able to have a go at building a case the weekend after next.(
Elliott, the chipamp may just find a home in a similar case like Listentothis' case

Quote:
Originally Posted by kuroguy View Post
...Really, the minimum investment to get into using a lathe is near $500.
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggy View Post
Yeah, I have way more cash in the other bits than the lathe itself. However, it does make a good multi-tool if you don't mind risking life and limb
Ouch, they would be the most expensive knobs/casefeet I've ever built if I take the lathe route -- i may have to give that idea a second thought

Quote:
Originally Posted by oneplustwo View Post
zkool - what do you use when you need to ground stuff? Do you have a metal base plate or something? Also, what knob is that? Finally, did you rip your pieces down with a table saw before making your 45 degree cuts? Or can you buy the poplar like that from home depot?
The amps I have so far uses a piece of metal or a copper board attached to ground. The starving students are P2P'ed to a copper clad board as the ground plane, while the SOHA II uses a bottom metal plate that came from an old CD-Rom case

The poplar comes in 3" or 6" wide, I just grabbed the 3" stock. I usually cut my 45 degree miters before I rip them on the table saw to the desired width (in this case they'll end up 2 1/4" wide), this way any imperfections (dings, scratches, blade tear outs, etc.) are trimmed away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Listen2this1 View Post
Mine is a little older but I thought I would add it.
Well, it's NEW to me I think it looks refined and unique, I love it.

How did you machine that nice top vent hole, and do you have pics of the insides/construction including getting that cool Millet logo on it? Iinitially I wanted to include the Cavalli "yin-yang" logo on the SOHA II top lid but I couldn't think of an option how to get that done.
post #95 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Ouch, they would be the most expensive knobs/casefeet I've ever built if I take the lathe route -- i may have to give that idea a second thought
Looking back at page 1, I used a bimetal circle cutter, with the guide bit for feet, and without for knobs. Then, mount on a bolt, and use the drill press to sand / round into shape. Plumbers roll works great for sanding on the drill press.

Those are Bocote feet on the rosewood case. I also made some from buckeye burl, and Ambroya (sp?), but dead simple.
post #96 of 400
Thread Starter 
Thanks for that tip pabbi1 I had no idea they're homemade, wow.. just shows they are "Pro" grade.

I think I have a good idea of your process, but not 100% sure (told you I'm novice at this). I'd like to try some using your technique so if you wouldn't mind/when you've got spare time, I really would love to see some 'how to' pictures (I'm a visual kinda guy)
post #97 of 400
Back in the day, when car audio was big I was an installer that did some nice rigs, I was really into the fiberglass side and did alot of router work. The most versatile piece of machinery that one can own. The templates I got from a friend of mine, they are really nice. With nice double sided tape you can apply the template to the wood, aluminum, and plexi. If you use a double bearing flush pattern bit you can come up with some cool designs. He also on his site explains how to do the logo's.

Mobile Solutions :: Smart Templates

Mobile Solutions :: How To's : Laminating Graphic Prints to Acrylic
post #98 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Thanks for that tip pabbi1 I had no idea they're homemade, wow.. just shows they are "Pro" grade.

I think I have a good idea of your process, but not 100% sure (told you I'm novice at this). I'd like to try some using your technique so if you wouldn't mind/when you've got spare time, I really would love to see some 'how to' pictures (I'm a visual kinda guy)
1. Bimetal hole saw - note the guide bit is removeable, in case you don't want a center hole. This one is 1.75", which will yield a 1.6" circle after sanding.



2. Cut the plug - clamping is a good idea, but, not really necessary. I run the drill press at 1200 rpm.



3. Cut plug - literally, this can be any size, even thinner stock glued together, even different woods IFF you plane the sides before cutting the plug.



4. Mount the plug with a bolt and nut - firmly, as this will be spinning on the press, in my case at 1200 rpm.



5 Sand with progressive grit - I did a quick 100, 150, 220,330, and 0000 steel wool. Further burnish can be added by using sawdust after the 0000 wool. This is without any finish.



Easy as 1-2-3, and 4 in an hour is truly no sweat.
post #99 of 400
Sweet knob!

Remember kids, a mill can be a lathe, a lathe can be a mill, and in a pinch a drill press will do!
post #100 of 400
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listen2this1 View Post
With nice double sided tape you can apply the template to the wood, aluminum, and plexi. If you use a double bearing flush pattern bit you can come up with some cool designs. He also on his site explains how to do the logo's.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pabbi1 View Post
Easy as 1-2-3, and 4 in an hour is truly no sweat.
Lots of clever and helpful tricks - thanks guys.
post #101 of 400
Thread Starter 

Part II: CTH Casework

(Continued from Part 1)

Well I got some more work done on the CTH case last night which really helped relieve some of the work stress I've had all week.

So last I night I trimmed the mitered pieces to get the height down to around 2-1/8”. Btw I made a last minute decision and did a minor change from my original design/plan. I really like the recessed knob on my SOHA II so decided to do the same for the CTH. The change does not affect the overall dimensions, only the look of the knob where it now also protrudes on top of the wood instead of it being centered.


With the pieces all trimmed down, the housing is high enough to keep the tall PCB parts (caps/heatsick) remain under when I install a lid, but it’s low enough for the tube (with socket saver) to stick out far enough for the heat to dissipate.


Next step is I drilled the holes for the jacks. Edit: If you prefer, you could also route out the back panel first (see couple of pics below) before drilling the holes.

I used a caliper to measure the diameters of the input/output/AC jacks, fuse holder, and heater switch then created a printable layout in Sketchup. The pot I plan to use is the Alps RK97 which comes with an on/off switch built-in, therefore a dedicated pwr switch is not needed for this build.


Printed the layout using 1:1 scale, then taped the print out to the wood piece which will in turn becomes the case back panel.
All set now for the drill press:


After drilling the holes using standard drill bits, I removed the paper template and followed the holes with a Forstner bit to recess them… only a wee bit.
(Edit: thefragger left a comment about this step and he makes a good point.
"thefragger: I would've done the drilling operations in reverse; forstner first then the thru holes, for the sake
of concentricity. The forstner leaves a little dimple in the centre which is perfect for drilling the thru hole.")




Before I can mount the jacks to the back panel, I need to carve some of the material out using a router with a ½” bit. A little over ½” deep should be sufficient.


Dry fit.


Made good progress I thought. The switch, fuse holder, and jacks all fit nicely and after a couple of hours in the shop the case is currently at this stage.


I’ll finish up the case by glueing the pieces together next time, clamp it tightly and then start working on the top/bottom lids next time.

Well I hope so far some new builders will find this log of value and get a few ideas from it when finishing/building their projects -- again, thanks for reading.

cheers!

(Continue to Part III)
post #102 of 400
holy ****balls...that's great work yet again zk...I should really commission a case out of you.
post #103 of 400
Thread Starter 
thanks my friend
post #104 of 400
One comment, and I really don't mean to take away from that great little case (love the way the volume knob is!) but I would've done the drilling operations in reverse; forstner first then the thru holes, for the sake of concentricity. The forstner leaves a little dimple in the centre which is perfect for drilling the thru hole.

Keep it coming
post #105 of 400
zk - do you have a special blade in your miter saw? the cuts seem very clean. Not sure if they're after sanding or if you have a fine tooth saw blade in there?
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