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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 5

post #61 of 400
Post up Ti/AMB's work.. his cases are always TOP NOTCH also.
post #62 of 400
Thread Starter 
M3NTAL, I've seen AMB's B22 casework, absolutely gorgeous (I want one badly). Let's also not forget Ferarri's caseworks -- they all look fantastic.

I'd love to post other people's casework *however* I'm not confident they'd approve. I don't feel it's appropriate since the actual builder might be oblige to respond if any questions arise or PMs start rolling into their inbox. If they really want to share their work they'll post themselves
post #63 of 400
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post #64 of 400
Putting a blade in a saw so it rotates backwards just sounds like a great way to get injured.

I've cut acrylic on a table saw with a carbide tipped saw blade with excellent results. Leave the protective paper on the acrylic as it contains a lubricant for the blade. the finished cut has a criss cross pattern on its face. smooth, but with the pattern. to remove the pattern you can polish it with progressive grits and then polishing compound or attempt to heat it with a torch. go too fast with the torch and you get crazing.
post #65 of 400
Unbelievable work zcool. I'm sure you could make a profession out of it.
post #66 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuroguy View Post
Putting a blade in a saw so it rotates backwards just sounds like a great way to get injured.

I've cut acrylic on a table saw with a carbide tipped saw blade with excellent results. Leave the protective paper on the acrylic as it contains a lubricant for the blade. the finished cut has a criss cross pattern on its face. smooth, but with the pattern. to remove the pattern you can polish it with progressive grits and then polishing compound or attempt to heat it with a torch. go too fast with the torch and you get crazing.

Actually, the backwards blade trick has been a widely known tip for people working with acrylic for years. It works really well.
post #67 of 400
A line preamp/dac I'm working on. Used the table saw, miter saw, drill press, dremel tool (with router attachment), orbital sander, and various taps. For repetative holes in a straight line, equal length or width pieces always setup a fence on your saw or drill press so all the parts/holes are uniform. this takes planning ahead to determining which parts have equal cuts and doing them all at the same time. This not only saves time resetting the tools over and over, but will pay off in the end with parts that fit better upon assembly and an equipment rack that looks very nice....
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post #68 of 400
Thread Starter 
kuroguy, very impressive! Did you use biscuits for the mitered joints or just glue and clamp?

I'm close to being done planning my CTH case. I'm going to do a 'mini' version of the SOHA II but will be finished in dark walnut. Hopefully start a build log and take some pics in the workshop starting this week.

post #69 of 400
I find that a proper 45 degree miter doesn't require any shoring up. I've done extras like slipfeathers or box joints but those were more about the look. I don't own a biscuit cutter. I have a piece of 1/4" shock cord that I wrap around the frame and make it very tight (like a big rubber band). I also have a big box of rubber bands. The miter joint can't help but to be square as long as the opposite sides are of equal length.
post #70 of 400
Will do. I'm a bit torn between recasing and trying to make it into a four channel balanced B22. Or even starting fresh and making a 4 channel B22 from scratch. But I would probably have to sell the cookie tin one first and frankly, I don't think anyone wants it!

I'm sure with your imagination, you could do awesome things with a mini mill. There isn't quite the flexibility there is with wood, but the precision is a facet that would be something you could take advantage of.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post

Ahh.. guess you could say it's the equivalent of a router with a staight bit in terms of woodworking (?). BTW please update us with some pics of your progress as you start your B22 case if you wouldn't mind? I might just grab a milling machine as I want to do some metal work as well.
post #71 of 400
Thread Starter 
Your B22 could rest on a scrap plywood and someone would still buy it. I think it's an ingenious idea... plus what's under the hood is what really matters

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnwmclean View Post
I am not worthy, I am not worthy, ........
johnwmclean, if I had your thick wallet and had no kids I wouldn't be messing with homemade cases IIRC, you designed your own encloure, yes?
post #72 of 400
That may be... it really does sound fantastic despite the enclosure. Perhaps the best sounding amp for the money, period! Maybe I'll just build the 4 channel first and then have something to compare to when it's done. Then I'll sell the three channel if it's really sub par. (Hard to say "sub par" when talking about the B22.) If I was really ambitious, I would build a 2 channel as well and compare all three! Maybe if some folks wanted to commission a couple builds...

Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Your B22 could rest on a scrap plywood and someone would still buy it. I think it's an ingenious idea... plus what's under the hood is what really matters
post #73 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Your B22 could rest on a scrap plywood and someone would still buy it. I think it's an ingenious idea... plus what's under the hood is what really matters
Well, not always...

post #74 of 400
Oh wow, is that a case for the transformer or did that come like that?
post #75 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by pabbi1 View Post
Well, not always...
Wow!!! that's really nice!!! what is it? Can I ask where did you get those black tube sockets?

I would certainly buy it, even without the plywood
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