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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 4

post #46 of 400
Just remember, when you go to the hardware store and buy a drill bit what you really want is a hole.

None of us really wants to spend our money on tools. what we really want is what the tool allows us to make.
post #47 of 400
oh yeah; my productivity and quality of work really took a leap when I got a decent soldering station, next is drill press and already ordered my dremel last week. was actually considering getting one of those presses for the dremmel; anyone got experience with those??
post #48 of 400
Thread Starter 
moodysteve, kuroguy, excellent machining tips! Comforting to know we have resident experts who can guide us along here. Btw, luv those jewelry boxes
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneplustwo View Post
To point #6 above, I just picked up a mini mill from Harbor Freight to help with some of my case work and other miscellaneous projects. It was "only" $489 minus 20% coupon which is pretty good considering the capabilities a mill brings to the table.
Oneplustwo, your casework would fit quite nicely in this area. That's some interesting design you're working on and anxiously waiting to see the outcome of your mill work. Care to share how your mill tool works? Pardon the ignorance I know nothing about metal work... is it something like a drill press, but on steroids?

Quote:
Originally Posted by qusp View Post
I have a feeling that cad was involved with more than the visualization process for the OP?? would I be right??

also; is that wood or 'wood' in the starving student case.
Yes, I use Sketchup, but before that I used pencil and paper . The wood 'wood' is really wood -- MDF wood that is

For my tools, it took several years to build an inventory of them. They can get quite expensive but worth every penny. It really is nice to know that you have a tool ready tackle most of my projects. Also just to add it's also crucial to have a dedicated working environment/shop, get a nice big, clutter-free workbench you can use to drill, glue, assemble, clamp and hold workpieces onto, etc.

Here are some pics of my small shop. Sorry about the bad quality since the digital SLR is not allowed anywhere near sawdust so the cell cam would have to do:



post #49 of 400
We can never be friends...

VERY nice shop - color me jealous. Maybe we need a thread of 'pics of your shop', just to put into perspective how nice yours is. Though, having a dedicated space helps - me, I have to use all portable things, as my garage is primarily for the wife's car.

Sketchup bookmarked - nice recommendation.
post #50 of 400
Thread Starter 
Thanks!

My wife *used* to complain when I turned the garage into a shop, but only until I made an addition to the deck, and also built a good sized pantry for our kitchen

Sketchup, go through the first and second Google video tutorials (5-10 minutes maybe?) and you'll be making "sketches" like these in no time!

post #51 of 400
A milling machine is kinda like a drill press on steroids. Everything is much stiffer because it's designed to make precision cuts (plus or minus a thousandth or so depending on the machine and operator skill) in the x and y direction as well as vertically like a drill press. Instead of just using drill bits, you can use end mills to make holes. Then you can turn those holes into slots by moving the work piece in the x/y directions since most end mills are designed to cut with their sides as well as with their ends. There are lots of other fancy things you can do as well. For example, you can make a mill computer controlled (CNC) and program it to make intricate 2D and 3D shapes and contours. There's a 2 second intro anyway... I'm still new to it myself but I'm looking forward to my next project. The M3 was a good first project. I'm going to recase my B22 and maybe do something fancier.



Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post

Oneplustwo, your casework would fit quite nicely in this area. That's some interesting design you're working on and anxiously waiting to see the outcome of your mill work. Care to share how your mill tool works? Pardon the ignorance I know nothing about metal work... is it something like a drill press, but on steroids?
post #52 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Millett Starving Student Hybrid (Amp II)



This right here is the exact reason why I need a router table. Beautiful work, I love the Art Deco styling

Great idea for a thread. I'll have to add mine to it when I finish a project or two



Philip.
post #53 of 400
Very cool thread and tons of great info. I love this stuff and you guys do some pretty awesome work. Makes me proud to finally be part of this great DIY group
post #54 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Here are some pics of my small shop. Sorry about the bad quality since the digital SLR is not allowed anywhere near sawdust so the cell cam would have to do...
Lucky you. I started out with half of a 2 car garage. then we had kids, so now my shop consists of one 3' x 8' workbench (homemade from a sheet of OSB and a few 2x4s. I installed a circuit in my panel and added a bunch of outlets to the bench (no more plugging and unplugging). All of my tools are bench top tools and I've drilled holes in the top of the bench that mate up with the mounting holes for my tools. I store the tools on shelves and take them down, mate them to the holes in the bench with some bolts I use as pins and when I'm done with the tool I put it back on the shelf.

For the size stuff we do it is more than enough workspace so long as I stay organized.

With the right tools and some planning you can setup a very useable shop in a very small space. I have less than 1/8 of the 2 car garage for myself.

I also managed to secure the back porch when we moved in here. the wife got every other space in the house (and I'm happy for the space I got).
post #55 of 400
Beautiful thread with already beautiful work. There are some real professionals here.
post #56 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by qusp View Post
I have a feeling that cad was involved with more than the visualization process for the OP?? would I be right?? either way, no matter ghow you came up with the finished result; thats some slick work and visualization. also; is that wood or 'wood' in the starving student case.

very nice me likes
Every project I do gets drawn in AutoCAD before I build it. That curved front Jewelery box I built had over 90 hours in it.

Drawing it in CAD allowed me to figure out the special angles I needed to cut to make the curved doors and most importantly, allowed me to see what the box was going to look like before investing the time to build it as it has over 300 unique parts and required over 600 individual cuts on the table saw.
post #57 of 400
zkool, all of your projects are simply amazing, but the SS really caught my eye, and I'd like to do something similar with my Cmoy (i know, that's like putting a bow on a turd, but oh well).

I'm guessing you used the glow of the tubes to achieve the bottom lighting? Obviously I'd have to use LEDs, but I've done similar things with my car stereo projects. Did you wet sand the plexi first in order to get the uniform glow? Also where did you get the plexi and how did you cut it?

I look forward to seeing what else you have up your sleeve!
post #58 of 400
Nice work everyone...



I think the mods should make this thread a 'sticky' one.
post #59 of 400
Acrylic can be cut with a table saw very easily. you can also use a router with a straight or flush trim bit.
post #60 of 400
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the compliments guys!

Quote:
Originally Posted by oneplustwo View Post
A milling machine is kinda like a drill press on steroids <snip>... I'm still new to it myself but I'm looking forward to my next project. The M3 was a good first project. I'm going to recase my B22 and maybe do something fancier.
Ahh.. guess you could say it's the equivalent of a router with a staight bit in terms of woodworking (?). BTW please update us with some pics of your progress as you start your B22 case if you wouldn't mind? I might just grab a milling machine as I want to do some metal work as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggy View Post
Very cool thread and tons of great info. I love this stuff and you guys do some pretty awesome work. Makes me proud to finally be part of this great DIY group
smeggy, that's great and looking forward to your CTH case when you get the chance. I'll also be working on mine shortly and will log my build as much as I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ka24altima View Post
...and I'd like to do something similar with my Cmoy
<snip>
I'm guessing you used the glow of the tubes to achieve the bottom lighting?
<snip>
Did you wet sand the plexi first in order to get the uniform glow? Also where did you get the plexi and how did you cut it?
There's nothing wrong with making an attractive case for your projects. I've seen cmoys housed in brushed aluminum with big shiny knobs ...more common altoid tins are popular because they're cheap and convenient It depends on how much time and money you have -- just do it

The bottom "glow" comes from two red LEDs mounted underneath the tubes. The plexi luckily already came frosted, a friend who works at a mall gave it to me (was part of a display stand). I trimmed it to size using my table saw.

TIP: If you install the saw blade BACKWARDS, it will cut through plastic/plexi/acrylic even soft aluminum sheets much smoother and cleaner.
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