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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 19

post #271 of 400
smeggy, that’s lovely mate. A very productive day indeed.
post #272 of 400
That looks amazing smeggy! That's gotta be one of my favorite up to date, but are you going to do something about ventilation?
post #273 of 400
Cheers,
Yes, the ventilation is fine for now as the tile doesn't block the vents, just sits over them supported by the side pieces, like another component. However, I still have a lot to do inside and out so it'll all get addressed as I make progress.
post #274 of 400
Your rush job > my rush job. I bow down to the master
post #275 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggy View Post
Due to little free time this is another rush job, bought the wood this morning and set to it as time allowed. Beta 22 in generic steel case with canarywood and a marble tile.
Nice work Smeggy - AND - it's a coaster!
post #276 of 400
Smeggy - that's awesome! Where do you get fancy wood from? Local lumberyard? Online?
post #277 of 400
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggy View Post

Smeggy, this is one classy and attractive lookin’ b22! That’s really an inspiring design which gives us lots of ideas.

I like the tones on that canary wood. I wouldn’t worry about shine since I think sometimes it’s desirable to show deep grains, much like oak where the beauty and variation in grain are to be expected – can’t wait to see the final product
post #278 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
I wouldn’t worry about shine since I think sometimes it’s desirable to show deep grains, much like oak where the beauty and variation in grain are to be expected...
On that note, filling the grain of red oak with lacquer is a huge pain in the ass. Red oak has hollow tubes that run the entire length of the grain. To prove this, you can use a scrap of red oak as a drinking straw. What happens is the lacquer seeps into these holes and displaces the air that was there. when this happens a very small air bubble forms in the finish. These bubbles ruin the glossy finish. There are 2 methods for preventing this from happening:

1. apply many, many very thin layers of lacquer - on the order of 25-30. and
2. take a vow to never again use red oak.

I've pretty much gone with method 2 but sometimes nothing fits the color scheme like red oak. Each time this has occurred I've sworn off method 1 again.
post #279 of 400
Thread Starter 
After reading that... I'll take option #2 please.
post #280 of 400
Swore I'd never use any oak again, until I happened onto some dark English oak... a bit denser, and less open grain. but never, ever white or red again, no matter how conveniently Home Depot cuts and stores it.
post #281 of 400
It's a pity really as some oak looks really nice if not for that impossible structure. One day I'll find a good grain filler that is quick and works really well. The Canary wood has a very nice grain pattern and look but it does have deep open grain, hard to get really smooth and would probably look worse with stain because of that.

It is easy to work though so it's not all bad, relatively cheap too for an 'exotic'. Looking at the pictures, it's starting to remind me of a bedside table. I should add legs to it
post #282 of 400
Kuroguy: What is the best way to "seal" the MDF so I can spray can paint it? I would like to "simulate" copper in particular.

gychang
post #283 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by gychang View Post
Kuroguy: What is the best way to "seal" the MDF so I can spray can paint it? I would like to "simulate" copper in particular.

gychang
I believe that MDF is directly finishable, but you should always start with a coat or two of primer just to be sure.
post #284 of 400
what's even better about Smeggy's case is there is also an EHHA in there! So left 1/4 is B22 and right is EHHA HOW COOL IS THAT!
post #285 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by gychang View Post
Kuroguy: What is the best way to "seal" the MDF so I can spray can paint it? I would like to "simulate" copper in particular.

gychang
That's a zkool question. He's done some beautiful stuff with MDF. If I had to guess, a full series of sanding thru about 600 grit followed by several coats of primer sprayed on followed by several coats of spray enamel, but I'll let zkool answer this one.
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