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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 17

post #241 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuroguy View Post
I make zero clearance inserts with a thickness planer and scroll saw. Tell your wife the planer and scroll saw will pay for themselves in the money you'll save by making your own inserts.

Don't tell her it will actually take about thirty inserts to break even and you just might pull this one off.

Never lose sight of the goal. You can never have too many power tools.
I have a Rigid R4516 and am unable to find a zero clearance insert since this is a new model saw. Could you make me a blank if I provide the dimensions?
post #242 of 400
Sorry to say, but I've no time for even my own projects lately. That on top of getting ready to move has left me with many of my tools already packed for the duration.

If you don't have a planer and scroll saw you should be able to get by with a belt sander and jig saw or even a coping saw.

Besides, you will need at least one for straight cuts and another one for 45 degree miters.
post #243 of 400
So what's the technique? Just make a piece that fits the profile and is the right thickness and then just run the dado/kerf/whatever blade through it with a piece of scrap on top?
post #244 of 400
pretty much. Thickness is important. if it is too thick the work will get caught on it when you try top feed it into the blade. if it is too thi the work will get caught leaving the insert. So, make the insert, lower the blade, install the insert, turn on the saw, and slowly raise the blade through the insert. No worry about tearout as it will occur on the bottom of the insert where the teeth exit the slot. You'll need a different insert for each thickness blade (or dado) and miter angle. Come to think of it, you might need 30 of these in time.
post #245 of 400
are these zero clearance inserts really that important? i'm still a noob at this stuff, but as long as you're not cutting really thin stuff, does it make a big difference?
post #246 of 400
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneplustwo View Post
So what's the technique? Just make a piece that fits the profile and is the right thickness and then just run the dado/kerf/whatever blade through it with a piece of scrap on top?
oneplustwo, here's a video demonstrating how to make a zero clearance:

ShopNotes Magazine - Making a Zero-Clearance Insert
post #247 of 400
Perfect! That doesn't seem all that hard. Thanks for the link! (Hmm... maybe I need to join a woodworking forum... suggestions on the head-fi equivalent?)
post #248 of 400
The ZCI is nice, but most of the time any areas that get torn out that end up inside a piece, usually not viewable even from the inside. Certainly worth the money, but if it's no replacement for a good blade.
post #249 of 400
Argh! I need to upgrade my blade too!? I've only made a few cuts with my stock blade, but it seems pretty good so far. Do I need a finer toothed one for cleaner cuts? Dado set is on the way already.
post #250 of 400
get a good sharp carbide tipped blade and it will do rips and cross cuts. The insert supports the edge of the wood and stops all tearout. This is important as the last part of the cut on the bottom of the piece is not always hidden inside the finished product. Besides, for a few minutes and a piece of scrap wood you really can't go wrong.

Another tip. Sharp tools cut best. That's pretty obvious. Resin from the wood will stick to the tips of your blades, in effect, making the cutting edge dull. I regularly clean my blades by soaking in thinner (acetone, lacquer thinner, or whatever I have around at the time) and brushing with a coarse brush. The difference between a clean blade and one gummed up with resin from the wood is night and day.
post #251 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
oneplustwo, here's a video demonstrating how to make a zero clearance:

ShopNotes Magazine - Making a Zero-Clearance Insert
I don't usually cut the slot in it prior to installing it. I find it easier and more accurate to just install it and raise the blade through it.
post #252 of 400
One more tip:

I use parafin (or even candle wax) to lubricate the accessory tracks on my table saws and other tools. Easiest is to rub it on the tool that slides in the track such as your sliding table and other jigs. It keeps the jigs from binding while cutting (aluminum makes a terrible bearing surface) and will even tighten up your jigs so there is less play between them and the tracks on your tools. Less play means more accurate cuts.
post #253 of 400
Thanks for the tips! Any suggestions on how many teeth? Or what number of teeth is better for what jobs?
post #254 of 400
zkool are you building your way up through Cavalli? I think you have the skill to skip to the best models now. Or do you want progression? And any chance youll do a B22?
post #255 of 400
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