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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 2

post #16 of 388
Here's my design for the AMB ß24 power amp.







As you can see, CAD is a tremendously valuable tool, especially 3D CAD like Solidworks or Inventor. The ability to fine-tune your layout (in some cases, both horizontal AND vertical) is really vital for me. I can't tell you how many problems I found during the design phase and thus never had to deal with in real life.

Not only is it great for weeding out problems, CAD affords you the opportunity to build something *exactly the way you want it*. Want to see what different color paint looks like? No problem. Want to see if you can fit an upgraded transformer or extra PCB? No problem.
post #17 of 388
zkool448 and Moodysteve, you both have tremendous talent. This is a great skill to have, aiding pre-production of your given amplifiers. Absolutely brilliant work guys.
post #18 of 388
I'm so happy that people who can build stuff like this exist. If it were left to me you'd be looking at old shoe boxes with components glued into them.
post #19 of 388
I just bought a router. Look out Fantastic stuff guys, a real inspiration.
post #20 of 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifesundeath View Post
I'm so happy that people who can build stuff like this exist. If it were left to me you'd be looking at old shoe boxes with components glued into them.
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!!!

Speaking of shoe boxes, the first prototype of my ß22 design didn't work out too well



So I went with metal instead. Back when this was made, I worked at an engineering company with a machine shop (all manual equipment) so I was able to make the case from scratch. The headphone jacks are not isolated, so they are mounted to a separate subplate made of Glastix, which is bolted to the front plate via blind tapped holes (guess how much of a relief it was when the jacks came out concentric with the holes!). The AMB ε12 is also mounted to the subplate. That's a Darwin Source Selector in the back, mounted on an aluminum bracket. Mounting it vertically was the only way to make it fit in my (completely arbitrary) desired case length of 12". Apologies for my lack of camera skills.





post #21 of 388
@ OP: 'Limited skills' indeed do you know anyone with 'extensive skills'? All three cases are amazing, I particularly like the SOHAII

@ MoodySteve: lol @ pizza box B22 The black and gold cases look great though
post #22 of 388
Great stuff all! Got a few helpful ideas already from this thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoodySteve View Post
As you can see, CAD is a tremendously valuable tool, especially 3D CAD like Solidworks or Inventor. The ability to fine-tune your layout (in some cases, both horizontal AND vertical) is really vital for me. I can't tell you how many problems I found during the design phase and thus never had to deal with in real life.

Not only is it great for weeding out problems, CAD affords you the opportunity to build something *exactly the way you want it*. Want to see what different color paint looks like? No problem. Want to see if you can fit an upgraded transformer or extra PCB? No problem.
I've been playing with a free clone of AutoCAD and I although I've only worked with 2D stuff, it's been extremely helpful already. Any tips on books or resources for learning Solidworks?
post #23 of 388
omg beautiful!
post #24 of 388
There are some mad skills on display in this thread. This guy always blew me away. Obviously has access to material and a shop.



Bergrans CD-Pro2M controller :: Case Building
post #25 of 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pars View Post
There are some mad skills on display in this thread. This guy always blew me away. Obviously has access to material and a shop.



Bergrans CD-Pro2M controller :: Case Building
OMG

That’s very clever!
post #26 of 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nebby View Post
I've been playing with a free clone of AutoCAD and I although I've only worked with 2D stuff, it's been extremely helpful already. Any tips on books or resources for learning Solidworks?
Solidworks actually has a built-in tutorial that's quite good. There's no better way of learning it than doing it, obviously. It's a very deep program and easy to get intimidated by, but most designers can use it by knowing about 10% of the functionality of the program.

I do use AutoCAD for layout as long as I don't have to stack components, as I do in my ß24. It's a lot easier and faster.
post #27 of 388
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys!

Already getting a bunch of other ideas for future builds. This is what I had hoped to see when I started the thread, hope more members participate and share their case build ideas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlizzofOZ View Post
SS Amp II, is that made out of wood and painted black?
Yes, entire enclosure is actually made out of wood (MDF)

This is what it looked like before two coats of sandable primer and two coats of textured metallic paint (from the automotive section):



Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilf View Post
What could help people is to perhaps share how you made some of the cases, and what tools you used, and what techniques. In the first build, you have wonderful clean, straight edges. How did you do that? How did you achieve the consistent rounded oblongs around the heatsinks?

I have an idea how you did that, but please share you experiences!

I would love to see a comprehensive "how I did this" for the SOHA case, featuring dirty, dirty shop pictures. Perhaps a bit on finish as well.

This thread here diyAudio Forums - A 'how to' for High Gloss Finishing - Page 1 is a good step-by-step guide how to achieve a good, high gloss finish.

If you did something similar for casework, you'd achieve godhood, nearly.
When I really need to achieve clean edges and lines, I always turn to my 60T saw blades (or even finer tooth blades) instead of the general purpose ones. The edge cuts always come out 'finished and clean' and needs very minimal sanding. The round edges and the SOHA II top lid were done with a router with a round over bit. I have my router mounted on a router table since I prefer to move the wood pieces instead of running the tool over (safer/easier).

I wish I had taken more photos of the SOHA II during the build. I'm about to build my next casework for the CTH amp. For this, I'll provide more details and pics of the build process, tools I'll be using, and finishing. Since the end product will/should resemble the SOHA II, the technique should be pretty close

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoodySteve View Post
BijouWork so far:
Looking good so far MoodySteve, nice! The Bijou and B22 are on my wishlist and hope to build them someday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pabbi1 View Post
Such a humiliating process... me overcompensating for lack of skill by using expensive material - Bolivian Rosewood in this case.
All my other builds are in my sig - casing is not my strong suit.
No, not lacking skills at all... I think your Rosewood Raven looks nice and elegant. I could tell you've put a lot of effort into it simply by looking at your intricate dovetail joints. Great job pabbi1! I wish I had your patience

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlizzofOZ View Post
I couldn't cut a piece of wood to save my life... even with the right tools.<snip>
I second the thought of HOW you made them. Hoping you took pictures during the process.

Once I complete my Mini3, I hoping to try a SS myself... if I can get my hands on those tubes.

I would be interested possibly buying a case from you... hand made by you.
I know that I couldn't pull that off myself.
BlizzofOZ, it just takes practice and hardly difficult as long as you plan before you start your project. I do plan to document my next case so stay tuned and you'll see that it's quite manageable to build it yourself

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbfreak View Post
A case I completed a few months ago for my HK Citation 12:
Very cool! ...and may I say I approve of the Gorilla glue!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nebby View Post
I've been playing with a free clone of AutoCAD and I although I've only worked with 2D stuff, it's been extremely helpful already. Any tips on books or resources for learning Solidworks?
Solidworks and AutoCAD I'm sure are pretty good for modelling/planning your work. Have you tried Google's Sketchup? It's free (not the Pro version) and it's what I use. Simple enough to learn and have good tutorials online with lots of support groups -- I think you'll like it.

Thanks all for sharing!
post #28 of 388
Wow, this thread is awesome. I haven't bought a single case for any of my projects, and I fully agree building a case is just as fun as the rest of the build
post #29 of 388
nice renders and builds!

Someday I will get off my ass and work on a nice case...

Nebby - should try rhino 3d I find it can accomplish things much faster; its much more intuitive and also has vray plugin rendering. IMO solidworks not worth learning unless you are going to use it for work.
post #30 of 388
There are some amazing cases in this thread. Casework is my weak link. I can't even get clean holes in the plastic Hammond face plates. Does anyone have any good guides to follow?
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