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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 10

post #136 of 400
Shows what good tools and great skills can do. You are a true artist!
post #137 of 400
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys really appreciate your kind comments

...and pabbi1, what kind of 'bigger projects' did you have in mind?

cheers.
post #138 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Thanks guys really appreciate your kind comments

...and pabbi1, what kind of 'bigger projects' did you have in mind?

cheers.
Stax Mafia - there are a few things pending, but will do a proper PM this evening. Let's just say there are some opportunities...

Mercenary = relentless =! fail.
post #139 of 400
Thread Starter 
Intriguing ...will patiently await for details
post #140 of 400
Phenomenal - I call Sticky, it would be criminal if this thread was lost.

zkool, did you buy or make your router table?
post #141 of 400
Thread Starter 
Hey Wilf, yes I built the router table and the fence about +6 years ago. The table is actually shared by my table saw (also custom built) and the router -- seasoned, sturdy, and still works very well.

Some pics for ideas in case you decide to build one for yourself. I won't get into details of the accessories attached, don't want to bore you with all that details







post #142 of 400
As much router work you do you should look at a Jessem lift. They are pretty slick, worth every penny.
post #143 of 400
Thread Starter 
Pretty slick indeed:



Never really cross my mind to get one of these before but after reading more about it I may just consider -- thx for the tip
post #144 of 400
Thread Starter 
BTW, managed to squeeze a couple more hours of casework this evening and made adittional progress. Had the top lid tube and fastener holes drilled out, bottom plate is done, and even managed to get the case feet in!

I'll have the pictures and some commentaries posted later on since it's a bit late... I'll have Part IV of the build log as soon as I get a chance tomorrow or the next day.

Cheers
post #145 of 400
zkool, thanks for posting the pictures, as they say, a Picture tells a thousand words.

Seriously, this post has taught me a huge amount. I'm mid-way through cutting my garage in half (no longer storing a car in there, and freeing up space for the kids to play on), and one of the areas that was going to re-done, would be my workbench. That's a definite now, but further refined to incorporate the tooling ideas here.

I have a basic table saw (I need to make a table, with slide rails and jig), a router (ditto the extra), hand drills (stand is on order), and various sander/heat guns/ the sort of hand tools the an industrial engineer gathers over 20 years)

Fired up, and raring to go, just need to finish my conservatory, as well as the garage!
post #146 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by zkool448 View Post
Hey Wilf, yes I built the router table and the fence about +6 years ago.

Some pics for ideas in case you decide to build one for yourself. I won't get into details of the accessories attached, don't want to bore you with all that details
That is very nicely setup. Who makes the tracks, knobs for fixing/moving the fence and the measuring tapes that are set into the tabletop?

I am feeling inspired by the setups shown, have started to clear the shed out to make room for a proper workbench. Plan to check out the hardware stores on the weekend.
post #147 of 400
Thread Starter 
Wilf, Forte, looking forward to hear the progress on your garage/shed renovations and soon to be 'workshops'

The tracks and jig accessories I use are all from Lee Valley, fortunately I live only a few minutes away from their warehouse!
You can search for jigs, knobs, clamps, and many other useful tools from their site.

edit: got home pretty late from a family gathering and slowly prep'ing part IV of the CTH casework.. stay tuned!
post #148 of 400
Thread Starter 

Part IV – CTH Casework, Finishing Top & Bottom Lids, Case Feet, and Final Dry Fit

(Continued from Part III)

This is Part IV of my CTH little case project. It’s nearing the home stretch so this will probably be the build log’s last portion.

Picking up where I left off, I took the top lid to the drill press and cut a 1” hole for the tube, plus four additional holes (5/32”) on each corner for the fastener screws. I placed a scrap wood block underneath the top lid to avoid tear-out.

Note: I find using a fence on the drill press table really helps support the piece and I get more accurate results when drilling several holes in series.


I fitted the top lid to the poplar wood chassis then pencil-marked the 4 holes I drilled previously. I then drilled 4 smaller holes on each corner of the poplar case, and tapped them for the fasteners to mount onto.

(Note: I can't seem to find those fancy hex nuts you pros use for your metal front or top plates. Instead I have to settle for some shoddy looking canvass fasteners from the local hardware store )


Next thing is I worked on the bottom cover for the case (i.e. the bottom lid). I used another piece of MDF and sized it accordingly.


I find that ¾” is a bit too thick for a bottom lid, so I turned to my portable planer to shave it down to about ½” thick. I could’ve gone thinner, but not so thin as I wanted the PCB (with standoffs) to sit a little higher inside so that the tube sticks further out from the top.


After I got the MDF piece thickness down to ½”, took it back to the router table and rabbeted the edges, sized just right to fit the bottom of the case.


I checked out the aisles of my local hardware store to see if I could find some cheap ‘alternate’ for case feet. I found these nail-on chair gliders and they look simple enough to install (used the same ones for my SOHA II but larger diameter). I thought they disguised themselves well after they’re installed – the beauty is a set only cost $2.50!

Before I can mount them to the base, I needed to pre-drill small holes in each corner for the nail to stick into (see red arrows). I didn’t want to just hammer them in since the nail could split the wood. After I drilled the small holes, I also needed to cut out small notches for each corner of the bottom lid to make space for the “feet” (see yellow arrows). The bottom lid and case feet all will be permanently epoxied to the base of the case.


Next step, I marked and pre-drilled the location where the standoffs will rest (and to be epoxied permanently to). I also added 3 large holes for additional vents (1.5” diameter each, I hope it’s more than enough to keep the amp well ventilated inside)


And so that is it -- the case is virtually complete, however there are still some things that need done. The entire project needs sanding before I can apply stain and paint the top/bottom lids. At any rate, I thought it has come a long way from a piece of poplar stock and few small pieces of MDF.

Overall I thought it turned out okay and here is what it looks like now (note: no pot/shaft installed):





So that is it for this edition of zk’s build log

Just want to take this opportunity to say that I’m really pleased to see some of you take some interest on this little CTH case project. The fact that I have very little electronics experience, it has been a struggle to find some way to contribute back to this forum. I thought by sharing this little project that you might find it worthwhile and offered some inspiration/give a few ideas even to just a couple of individuals in this great DIY community. Even if only one person finds this of value I’ll be more than happy .

Once again, thank you all for reading – cheers.
post #149 of 400
ooh - a mini version of the SOHA II case. Very nice!
post #150 of 400
That is simply incredible. I think you and Ferrari have all the wooden and metal enclosures covered.
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