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Casework: Share Your DIY Enclosures - Page 9

post #121 of 400
Pabbi1,
I've seen worse. I didn't post photos of all the bikes, yard tools, trash cans, etc. Trust me, they're there. Also, we pulled my wife's car out of the garage to get that free space. I throw out anything that is not used for more that 3 months if it isn't mine and 6 months if it is mine. Still, my workshop habitat is the victim of the pressures of civilization and micro urban sprawl. I do; however, manage to find the time to sweep out the cobwebs once or twice a year. I also give my shop a thorough cleaning before I start spraying lacquer on any projects.

By the way, no takers on the only 3 power tools question? I think it might be helpful to those just starting to build a workshop if they were to know what we all consider the most useful tools, especially for those that don't have a few thousand dollard to outfit a workshop.
post #122 of 400
I am torn on the 3 power tools, as Drill press and Dremel are given, but I have lived a while without the table saw (finally got a 'portable'), using hand saws and the Jointer... the #3 is my hand sander, as no project lives without it - ever, but I'd call table saw 4a and Jointer 4b. Then, router is 4c.

So, there are my 6 essentials, hand sander, drill press, dremel, table saw, jointer, and router (especially now that I have a dovetail jig).
post #123 of 400
With some homemade jigs (made mostly from scraps) my table saw can cut very accurate miters, straight cuts, and even cuts at any angle such as 60 and 30 degrees. I can use it to cut rabbets, fingerjoints (another homemade jig), tenons, and even mortises. It is the most versatile tool in my arsenal.

I've used the drill press as a lathe on occasion. It is also most useful for drilling holes without tearout. It is pretty much a requirement for a good looking panel. A hand drill has nothing on a drill press so long as you have a plan and make all the necessary holes before assembly. I also use it to add holes after assembly although the table is sometimes too small to achieve much more accuracy than can be achieved with a hand drill.

My Dremel does everything else. It can make nice finished edges from 1/8" radius to rabbets to slots to mortises and tenons. It sands, shapes, grinds, and cuts anything I throw at it. I have the drill press attachment (hardly gets used these days), router attachment (use all the time) and even an attachment to remove grout from tile.

In a pinch I can hand sand with a block. Sanding goes slower, but if you take time and make smooth cuts with the 3 power tools it should be a minimal task anyway.
post #124 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by pabbi1 View Post
I am torn on the 3 power tools, as Drill press and Dremel are given, but I have lived a while without the table saw (finally got a 'portable'), using hand saws and the Jointer...
Cutting a straight piece of wood is gonna be a problem with just the hand saw and no jointer. you might want to rethink that third power tool.
post #125 of 400
Thread Starter 
It's refreshing to see what kind of shops people have in their homes to build their projects in.

I like my table saw, my router table, and compound miter saw, and of course can't live without my dill press (I know that's 4 things )

Getting ready to post Part III of my CTH casework...
post #126 of 400
Thread Starter 

Part III – CTH Casework, Machining the Top Lid

(Continued from Part 2)

Picking up where I left off, I've glued all the mitered pieces together, clamped it tightly and let the glue dry overnight. Here is the type of clamp I use to hold mitered pieces tightly in place.

Once dried, I sanded the case only a little bit and used it as a reference to get uniform dimensions for the top lid. I use a large sanding block so the edges remain straight and more importantly -- flat.


I cut a small piece of MDF wood for the case top lid, sized it just big enough to cover the top surface. These are the same steps I did when I machined the top lid of my SOHA II. Basically I used a table router to machine a ¾” MDF wood to get the "look" I'm after. Looking at the diagram you can see how the wood piece is “cut” or routed to reveal the top profile:


I started with a ¾” straight bit and made “rabbets” to the front & back ends, then did the same for the sides, only just sunken just a wee bit.




I then changed the router bit so I can make the “cove” profile to round the part near where the vent holes will be. (lot of bit changes here for sure).


….Then changed bits again to “chamfer” the outside edges.


Next is I carved out the vent holes. With the top lid flipped over I carved out some of the material for the top vent/cooling channels.


Almost done…


The last step is to rabbet all four sides of the bottom so that it’ll sit snuggly on top of the case.


Dry fit:




…And that is it for the top plate. Only things left to do is drill the holes for the tube and lid fasteners. Will make the bottom cover also which will have 3 large centered holes for improved circulation/cooling. The top lid will be primed and painted silver using high-heat paint (automotive paint). The dilemma is I’m having second thoughts whether to stain the case dark walnut, or perhaps do a light(er) cherry finish this time – guess I’ll decide once I get to that part.

Thanks again for reading!



(Continue to Part 4)

^
post #127 of 400
that's insane =o
post #128 of 400
cool stuff zk.
post #129 of 400
You might just be the next Norm Abram
post #130 of 400
I gotta get me a router
That's amazing work zk!
post #131 of 400
ZK, we need to talk about some bigger projects for you, since you aren't even straining...
post #132 of 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by pabbi1 View Post
ZK, we need to talk about some bigger projects for you, since you aren't even straining...
I have a feeling we're thinking the same exact thing
post #133 of 400
Collaboration is a beautiful thing.
post #134 of 400
heh, you guys are mercenary

Excellent and informative as always zk! I just wish changing bits on my table was quicker/easier. I need to devise a simpler method to do that and get more use from my wee router table.
post #135 of 400
I need to finish my CNC gantry mill.
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