New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

coffee-fi - Page 6

post #76 of 271
This never even occurred to me, but how do you visually tell coffee beans apart? Is it possible? The Kenyan vs. the cheap stuff college kids usually drink?

It's one thing to be particular about where your coffee or tea is grown and how it's processed, but to do so while price altering?? Wow.
post #77 of 271
visually i cannot tell one type of coffee bean from another. if they weren't labelled i would no have no idea what they are. the only way i would tell its a different kind than what im used to is when im at home and making coffee and i drink it.

the kenya aa i drink is pretty damn cheap so im guessing you are talking about another one.
post #78 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagarach View Post
This never even occurred to me, but how do you visually tell coffee beans apart? Is it possible? The Kenyan vs. the cheap stuff college kids usually drink?

It's one thing to be particular about where your coffee or tea is grown and how it's processed, but to do so while price altering?? Wow.
I've never noticed a difference in the beans in terms of quality. Maybe sometimes the oil levels or the color of the beans may slightly vary but I have not associated such differentiations as indicators of quality. Tea though can be visually inspected for quality at least. Cheaper teas have damaged leaves with insect bites, burn marks or bruising, and are torn up as opposed to whole leaves.
post #79 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by XxATOLxX View Post
I'm planning on trying every flavor of canned coffee at Trader Joes.

I'm really liking their Bali Blue Moon medium roast which has a bold chocolatey flavor/aroma. I also tried their French Roast which was also pretty good. Dark, but not bitter.

The only one I'm not too big of a fan of is the Colombian Supremo. I didn't think it had very much body or boldness in flavor, in fact, I found it to be kind of boring.
Colombia has a rather bizarre system of rating coffee beans. The beans are grouped by size, with Supremo being the largest bean size, and has absolutely nothing to do with quality.
post #80 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagarach View Post
This never even occurred to me, but how do you visually tell coffee beans apart? Is it possible? The Kenyan vs. the cheap stuff college kids usually drink?

It's one thing to be particular about where your coffee or tea is grown and how it's processed, but to do so while price altering?? Wow.
Much easier to tell when they're green. Here are 4 types I had kicking around: from left to right
Costa Rica - Helsar de Zarcero (Cattura Microlot)
Sumatra - Takengon Aceh
India - Monsoon Malabar AA
Thailand - Doi Chaang AA

post #81 of 271
Every couple of months I treat myself to a cup of Blue Mountain. Beats the he11 out of the instant Nescafe that I drink on a daily basis!

The best coffee I have ever had was in Vietnam. They place a small device with a metal filter and loaded with fresh roasted coffee on top and drip directly on ice and condensed milk. The coffee is strong, complex and fragrant and I can most closely describe it as a chocolately flavor!

Vietnamese coffee FTW!
post #82 of 271
To me the best coffee in the world is "Bourbon pointu" from the French overseas department Reunion Island.

BOURBON POINTU(ƒuƒ‹ƒ{ƒ“ƒ|ƒƒ“ƒgƒD) 2009ŒöŽ®ƒTƒCƒgb UCC㓇àÛàè
http://www.cafe-reunion.com/?lang=en

Good luck finding it though outside japan though, I actually have friends from there, so I tasted it myself. I would not say it's the best coffee in the world since I did not test them all but it certainly went above the Jamaican Blue Mountain for me.
post #83 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagarach View Post
This never even occurred to me, but how do you visually tell coffee beans apart? Is it possible? The Kenyan vs. the cheap stuff college kids usually drink?
One difference I've noticed between the high-grade Sumatra from my local coffee shop and the Sumatra from Starbucks is that the local shop's beans are just physically coated in a layer of oil that comes out of the coffee beans over time. You can just tell visually what kind they are because the beans are glossy whereas the Kenya from Starbucks, which I also have some of (avoid, made my stomach nauseous) has a very dull finish which I assume is due to the difference in the beans themselves.
post #84 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by MD1032 View Post
One difference I've noticed between the high-grade Sumatra from my local coffee shop and the Sumatra from Starbucks is that the local shop's beans are just physically coated in a layer of oil that comes out of the coffee beans over time. You can just tell visually what kind they are because the beans are glossy whereas the Kenya from Starbucks, which I also have some of (avoid, made my stomach nauseous) has a very dull finish which I assume is due to the difference in the beans themselves.
The difference is roast levels. The oily sheen comes form roasting dark, like Vienna or French roast. Lighter roasts don't show this. Also, roasting dark reduces acid levels (Sumatra coffees are low acid to begin with).

Kenya coffees are higher in acid, especially at lighter roasts, so that might be why it upset your stomach.
post #85 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by beerguy0 View Post
The difference is roast levels. The oily sheen comes form roasting dark, like Vienna or French roast. Lighter roasts don't show this. Also, roasting dark reduces acid levels (Sumatra coffees are low acid to begin with).
I would definitely agree; the oil is inside the un-roasted bean, and roasting brings the oil to the outside of the bean as it caramelizes
post #86 of 271
Enjoying a freshly brewed (manual drip) cup of DP Ethiopia Guji Sidamo, roasted on Sunday. I took the roast just to the end of Full City, just before 2nd snap. Amazing cup, a real fruit bomb. Love the dry-processed coffees, especially the Ethiopian and Yemen coffees.
post #87 of 271
Just pulled out a 60% Java LTD 40% Indian Malabar double shot, and I think I've found the sweet spot. The Malabars musty overtones can overshadow other coffees, but if you pair it with something smooth and distinct, you get the tones without blasting away the paired coffee. Perhaps I should toss in ~15% Terrazu, see what happens.
post #88 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbax19 View Post
Every couple of months I treat myself to a cup of Blue Mountain. Beats the he11 out of the instant Nescafe that I drink on a daily basis!

The best coffee I have ever had was in Vietnam. They place a small device with a metal filter and loaded with fresh roasted coffee on top and drip directly on ice and condensed milk. The coffee is strong, complex and fragrant and I can most closely describe it as a chocolately flavor!

Vietnamese coffee FTW!
Just so you know you can order that at most Vietnamese restaurants.

I'm not so sure about the quality of the coffee though. Its worth a try anyways.
post #89 of 271

Decaf?

I know decaf coffee is probably sacrilege, but I like the taste and can't have the caffeine. Anyone know where I can mail order good decaf whole bean coffee that is organic?

I have one of two choices near home but the price is high and the type changes so no "go to" one other than a blend.

My favorite is sumatra, BTW.

thanks
post #90 of 271
This tread is NUTS! haha.... id love to make my own coffee roaster and make my own cuppas... for now ill use what i have
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home