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coffee-fi - Page 19

post #271 of 291
I keep a large selection of other coffees for normal drinking. I am quite partial to Yemeni coffees 29.gif
post #272 of 291

http://z6mag.com/featured/drinking-coffee-may-reduce-the-risk-of-tinnitus-1624663.html

 

coffee drinkers rejoice! 

post #273 of 291

Anyone from Canada (and parts of US) try Tim Hortons dark roast? its not bad for tim hortons (less watery, thicker tasting)

post #274 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinkertailor View Post

Anyone from Canada (and parts of US) try Tim Hortons dark roast? its not bad for tim hortons (less watery, thicker tasting)

I prefer tim hortons double espresso than Starbucks and it's cheaper.
post #275 of 291
I had a friend bring some Kona back from Hawaii and, at least with this current sample, i am not really diggin' it.
It seems too "rich" and "thick" to the point where it is masking the flavors. I am still messing with the measurements and brew but has anyone had similar experiences?

Using Cleaver Dripper. 300g of water with 18g of coffee with 4 minutes brew time.
I've always wanted to try Tim Horton's coffee!
post #276 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnman1116 View Post

I had a friend bring some Kona back from Hawaii and, at least with this current sample, i am not really diggin' it.
It seems too "rich" and "thick" to the point where it is masking the flavors. I am still messing with the measurements and brew but has anyone had similar experiences?

Using Cleaver Dripper. 300g of water with 18g of coffee with 4 minutes brew time.
I've always wanted to try Tim Horton's coffee!


What brand of Kona coffee did you receive? Is it a dark or medium roast? Like other coffees not all Kona coffees are equal, some are better than others. Can't say that I've had a cup of Kona where it's characteristics were "rich" and "dark". Unlike other coffees Kona is a mild tasting coffee and can taste bland when not brewed correctly. Make sure you use the right type of grind for your method of brewing. I typically use a coarse grind and a French press when I'm brewing some Kona. In general it's recommended that you use 2 level tablespoons per six ounces of cold water or 1 tablespoon per cup (4 oz.).


Edited by warubozu - 9/30/14 at 12:17pm
post #277 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post
 

Interesting. Is there a known reputable seller in the U.S.? I usually shop at World Market, Sprouts, or Trader Joe's. While I personally love World Market's coffee, I do know that they grow most of their beans here in the U.S.  Thus I'm not sure if they have pure 100% Kona.

 

Another coffee I've always heard about but have yet to try is Blue Jamaican.  Seems like I still have a world of coffee to discover. :-)

 

Jamaican Blue Mountain is incredibly rare. The vast majority goes to Japan, because they're willing to pay top dollar. I haven't had it since back in the 80's, but while it's an excellent cup, it's also extremely mild and delicate. If you're looking for real coffee flavor it's best to look elsewhere. I favor Ethiopian coffees, especially the dry processed ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLeader View Post
 

Anomaly Coffee, up here in Hanover.  I'm very excited about it, and I've got some test ordering up on the website as I ramp up and buy equiptment, etc. 

 

Nice. As a home roaster I'm always glad to see someone take it from a hobby to a business.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnman1116 View Post
 

Question:
Would coffee from different geographical locations have different levels of caffeine per bean?

for example, south american beans are more caffeinated than beans from africa.

 

sweet maria is pretty delicious :)

 

Arabica coffees are much lower in caffeine than Robusta coffees. Also, roast level is a factor in caffeine content. The caffeine gets burned off during the roasting process, so the darker the roast the less caffeine in the cup. Not sure if any specific origins have more or less caffeine than others.

post #278 of 291

I live in the Kootenays here in BC.  We have about 5 (that I can think of off the top of my head), Small scale roasting companies here. Coffee is a big thing. My favorite so far is litterally called "Kootenay Coffee". Organic, fair trade, nice rich flavor for all their roasts. Another good local one would be "Oso Negro" nice dark deep coffee types. Something like Starbucks but better flavor. Roasted right in my home town at their coffee shop.

 

And as many have mentioned before. Im Canadian. Tim Hortons addiction is nearly born into us 

post #279 of 291

I love dark roast. I never buy the same pound of coffee twice in a row. This way, I always end up with a continuous variety, and will never get tired of one. We have a roaster here on the island called Fresh Cup Roastery Cafe. Right now, I have a pound of their Peruvian Dark, and a pound of their Sumatra Ultra Dark. These guys roast the beans and ship the same day. They offter free shipping across Canada. Both of these roasts are fantastic. Some other brands and types I like are Kicking Horse Grizzly Claw Dark Roast, Kicking Horse 454 Horse Power Dark Roast, Salt Spring Island Dark French Roast, Salt Spring Island Sumatra Dark Roast, Fernwood Strongback Dark Roast, Doi Chaang Single-Estate Dark Roast, and Level Ground Tanzania Dark Roast. These are all great beans. The profiles I love the most are rich and bold, dark chocolate notes in the swallow, cocoa notes, nutty notes, or that very smoky taste. I do not like "flavored" coffee though. I always drink my coffee black, strong, and with no cream or sugar.

post #280 of 291

@beerguy0 - Nice to meet a fellow home roaster.  What equipment do you use?


Edited by CaffeinatedX42 - 8/31/15 at 7:37pm
post #281 of 291
Just found this thread. We have been really stepping up our coffee game over the last two years. Always loved coffee, but never took the time to read about how to make a better cup. We use a chemex and aero press in our home, used those for two years, they both give a different taste and mouth feel for me with the aero being a thicker feel and the chemex being cleaner. We are lucky enough to have some great coffee roasters in town. I'm awaiting my hand grinder that I ordered off Kickstarter! It should be here sometime in December. We've just been using a little cheapy grinder thus far.
post #282 of 291

I'm glad to have found this thread.  Big fan of coffee an currently have my career(distributor/sales) around it.

 

Have you guys heard of cold-brew coffee?  It's picking up some steam here in So.Cal.  Basically coffee grinds(regular drip setting) that is stepped in room temp(or cold) water for 16-24 hours.  The process extracts more flavors and has a concentrated amount of caffeine, basically 3-4x the amount of caffeine of an 8oz. cup of coffee. 

post #283 of 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitead View Post
 

I'm glad to have found this thread.  Big fan of coffee an currently have my career(distributor/sales) around it.

 

Have you guys heard of cold-brew coffee?  It's picking up some steam here in So.Cal.  Basically coffee grinds(regular drip setting) that is stepped in room temp(or cold) water for 16-24 hours.  The process extracts more flavors and has a concentrated amount of caffeine, basically 3-4x the amount of caffeine of an 8oz. cup of coffee. 


I didn't know that about the difference in caffeine content, thanks. Cold-brew coffee is also great for people that want to avoid the acidity of regular coffee.

post #284 of 291
In Omaha we are seeing a lot of the shops introduce nitro tap coffee. Which is a cold brew attached to a nitro tap (think Guinness) it has a velvety mouth feel and is just amazing. They generally serve it in a tulip glass.
post #285 of 291
Nitro infused cold-brew is amazing, mainly due to the creamy texture from the nitrogen.
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