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coffee-fi - Page 12

post #166 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by grokit View Post

 

Do you use a blade grinder or a burr grinder? I would think that the silt would mostly be a problem with the blade-type (spice/coffee) grinders.


I use a burr grinder (Baratza Virtuoso).

 

I was looking at the one I have, and it's not the same as the one in your photo. Mine is an Ekobrew, for Keurig machines. The one pictured in your post looks like it might do a better job, since it appears to have a restrictor at the bottom of the filter holder. The Ekobrew fits in the K-cup holder, but it pretty much lets the water run right through.

 

post #167 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by fzman View Post

I do, from time to time.  It makes a nice cup - less bite than other methods - has a similar smoothness/density to French Press.  Make the whole pot, and transfer to a thermal carafe or thermos to keep it hot without applying heat.
The Chemex is the only coffee maker I have. If I don't have time for the ritual of coffee then I don't have time for coffee just then. I've taken to brewing iced coffee for first-thing-in-the-morning wake up drinks, though.
post #168 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by disastermouse View Post

I haven't been able to read the whole thread, but who else here uses a Chemex to brew their coffee?

I use a Chemex and an Able Brewing Kone V3 Filter. :-) 

post #169 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by DxBecks View Post

I use a Chemex and an Able Brewing Kone V3 Filter. :-) 
I have a similar steel filter and use it occasionally. You have to grind finer and what you get is closer to French Press coffee than it is if you use a paper filter.
post #170 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublea71 View Post

Sorry, guys - I didn't read the first post before I put up that cold-brew recipe. Anyways, I go for the cheap stuff here in Saigon - 2 dollars for about a half pound, and it isn't bad at all (yeah, it's robusta). They also sell weasel coffee here, but it's very expensive and I'm attempting to be frugal (to afford more headphones).

 

I wouldn't worry about it.  The thread went off topic by post #39 (years ago).

 

The concept of creating a thread called "coffee-fi" but restricting people to only talking about the beans themselves was not realistic.  It would be like creating a thread called "audio-fi" and forcing people to only discuss songs.

 

The thread should have perhaps been more appropriately called "coffee bean & blend-fi".


Edited by CaffeinatedX42 - 3/27/13 at 10:01pm
post #171 of 279

I'm enjoying a glass of cold-brewed Vietnamese Robusta brewed with ground chicory.....if you haven't tried adding chicory, it imparts a really nice flavor that goes well with coffee. It's popular in New Orleans - first time I had it was at Cafe du Monde in the French Quarter.
 

post #172 of 279

you ENJOY pure robusta!? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by doublea71 View Post

I'm enjoying a glass of cold-brewed Vietnamese Robusta brewed with ground chicory.....if you haven't tried adding chicory, it imparts a really nice flavor that goes well with coffee. It's popular in New Orleans - first time I had it was at Cafe du Monde in the French Quarter.
 

post #173 of 279

Absolutely - it's not half-bad in Vietnam, especially if it's cold-brewed with some chicory as I mentioned. And it's very, very inexpensive.
 

post #174 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublea71 View Post

Absolutely - it's not half-bad in Vietnam, especially if it's cold-brewed with some chicory as I mentioned. And it's very, very inexpensive.
 

 

It confuses me why drinking 100% robusta is so uncommon.  It's very trendy in the US coffee world to adventure way outside the center of the flavor spectrum, with bright as the sun sour espresso bombs and sweet ultra fruity zero body single origins.  I think the anit-robusta snob factor left over from the 90's still lingers and just won't die despite robusta having something unique to offer.

 

I find a good high grade robusta to be very fun on occasion with great mouthfeel, super big & full body, a bakers chocolate and earthy flavor, ending on an occasionally strong  bitter note.  It's comparable to gueuze in the beer world; a very good style of beer that just isn't to everyones taste.

 

It makes sense you can find good quality robusta for cheap in Vietnam as it's one of the worlds largest producers.

post #175 of 279

We should make 100% robusta the cool coffee- "fourth wave."

post #176 of 279

It could happen with a bit of a marketing push by the right companies. Vietnam has an unbelievable amount of coffee shops - they are ubiquitous and it's very ingrained into their culture, partially as a result of French colonialism (based on what I've read - I'm not a historian!).
 

post #177 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by JadeEast View Post

We should make 100% robusta the cool coffee- "fourth wave."

 

Let's do it!  We can throw in Turkish style coffee and grinding with a mortar & pestle for good measure.

post #178 of 279

I'm drinking Sulawesi Kalosi right now (Costco believe it or not).  In the past I've used the Peet's variety and this is very comparable.

 

There's nothing like listening to Bill Evans through a nice set of cans while drinking coffee in the A.M. IMO...

post #179 of 279

Oh, and the Sulawesi also tastes great when cold-brewed (as reported by the Mrs.)  :)

post #180 of 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsound View Post

Oh, and the Sulawesi also tastes great when cold-brewed (as reported by the Mrs.)  :)

 

What method do you use to cold-brew?  Cold brewing is one of the few areas I have not yet explored.

 

I've been eyeing the Yama for a while but can't figure out where the heck I would put it (1/3rd of the counter is already full).  

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