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coffee-fi - Page 2

post #16 of 276
Black Cat from Intelligentsia and French Vanilla from Papa Nicholas are my go to beans. Both locally roasted too.

I only drink coffee (mainly lattes) maybe once or twice a week, so it's sad to see some of the coffee go past its prime before I finish it.
post #17 of 276
it's a bit more work, but if you *really* like coffee you should roast your own. after a bit of playing around you can get the beans consistently roasted exactly how you want them and in the end you'll actually save a lot of cash vs. buying pre-roasted beans. very little waste as well as you can just roast beans at the rate you use them. unroasted beans stay good for a long time (often up to 2 years).
post #18 of 276
Dunkin Donut Dark Roast is pretty darn good.
post #19 of 276
Munduk, Bali native roast.

I've been to the island a few times. Each time I bring as much of this back as I can fit in the luggage. It's a very light roast as bean roasting is a "primitive technology" there. None the less, the flavor is my favorite, bar none!
post #20 of 276
I love making my own espresso at home. LaMarzocco Linea + Mazzer Major + great coffee + skill = bliss.
post #21 of 276
post #22 of 276
interesting thing about the Jamaican coffees- you can't get them in jamaica! I tried getting the famous green (or is it blue?) mountain coffee when I was there, and only thing I could find was a friend who brought me some raw green beans. Not to useful when you're camping in the jungle!

I've found this to be true in other places that grow good coffee too. In Ecuador, all you can get is Folgers. My memory is a little hazy about Guatemala cause I was sick most of my time there, but I don't remember seeing any good coffee.
post #23 of 276
Mountain Top Estate Bin 35
post #24 of 276
My go to is Barefoot Roasters, Element. Consistent and hearty.

Barefoot Coffee Roasters - Element

I ran into Ritual Roasters the other week and really like them as well. Their Sweet Tooth Espresso is phenomenal.

Ritual Coffee Roasters | Sweet Tooth Matalapa La Cidra, El Salvador

I've used Illy in the past and actually, I like it for coffee in a can.

I've also got a stash of Arabic coffee that an Israeli friend brings me from Israel. I use my iBrick for that but only when I have time to watch it.
post #25 of 276
I know a guy who works at Ritual in San Francisco, and coffee to him is what headphones are to us. Really could just talk and talk about coffee. Seemed to have a similar impact on his appreciation of the commonly available coffees (headphones) too because after knowing really good coffee, it seems he was able to taste mistakes in many so called gourmet coffees (Bose)
post #26 of 276
Yeah, I met one of the barristas at the Alemany Farmer's Market last Sat. She gave me the quick rundown on the beans I was buying. They know their stuff.
post #27 of 276
Interesting that no one mentions Nespresso - the coffee expert from Switzerland.

Nespresso Coffee Premium Blends: Coffee Origin

I have a demanding job and am glad that Nespresso fills my life - now I have very good coffee without having to spend the time on it.

My personal opinion about coffee is that it is like wine - it is all in the blending.

F. Lo
post #28 of 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythmdevils View Post
interesting thing about the Jamaican coffees- you can't get them in jamaica! I tried getting the famous green (or is it blue?) mountain coffee when I was there, and only thing I could find was a friend who brought me some raw green beans. Not to useful when you're camping in the jungle!

I've found this to be true in other places that grow good coffee too. In Ecuador, all you can get is Folgers. My memory is a little hazy about Guatemala cause I was sick most of my time there, but I don't remember seeing any good coffee.
You raise an interesting point...I'm guessing most of it is exported because the industry can make a lot more profit that way...the locals are probably priced out of their own product.

I have a friend who goes to Mexico a lot, and found a small roaster in some village inland from Veracruz...I guess the guy will prepare a sample (espresso shot) of any coffee that you might considering buying, and having tried some back here in the States, I'll say that it's damn good!

Anyway, point being that there are probably trade-related reasons why it's hard to find in the producing countries, but if you know where to look, it's probably there somewhere.
post #29 of 276
i roast at home with my gene cafe, and love it. Beans are from Burman's in Madison Wisconson, and Sweet Maria's, and the Captains Coffee. My taste runs more to earthy, rich coffees, no tangy, no tart. This is great fun, and saves money -- how do you beat that?!
post #30 of 276
I used to be the bean counter for my friend's coffee roasting/retail business called Francesco's Coffee Company:

Francesco's Coffee Company

Awesome coffee! My favourites were the Peruvian Fair Trade and a blend called Mocha Del Nonno. His espresso is also very good.
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