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the Pimeta-V2 thread - Page 6

post #76 of 568
Thread Starter 
geeze, both amb and you (tangent) are using that popup graphic window thingie.

what's up wid dat? is this a new cult of sorts?

seriously, I'm curious - why are websites going with MORE popups?

javascript. brrrr. me no likey.
post #77 of 568
The shop page has been JS powered since its inception, and has absolutely required JS since January of 2007, when spammers began randomly submitting crap to every form on the Internet they could find, just in case it might do something interesting. (Try loading the shop page with JS disabled.) They don't yet usually bother to run pages through a JS interpreter to see if it generates a form they can spam.

Regarding popups, the previous mechanism used an actual popup window, which most browsers now block or redirect to a separate page. The new mechanism at least pops up inline where you can see it, and goes away at a click.

So no, I'm not changing it.
post #78 of 568
Would it work ok to run the Pimeta from a computer PSU? I had wild idea to put one in a drive bay.
post #79 of 568
It would work, but it would probably be pretty noisy.
Might be better to at least power a seperate linear PSU from the 12v rails of the computer's PSU.
post #80 of 568
Id just filter the 12v. Just pretend the 12v is regulated and apply some fast caps and some large caps. Just make a make shift tread or YJPS without the regulator. just pop in c5,c6, and c8 of the tread in your 12v wiring to the amp. That gets your fast and large caps right there, and the amp itself will filter some of the noise too.

Hell just get a tread for 5 bucks when you order the audio board, both will fit in any slot. Just feed the 12v pc in after the rectifier.
post #81 of 568
You also have an isolation problem. Search this forum for "USB power". It's the same problem, only you have the option of using either the +5 or +12V rail, instead of just +5. Working around the isolation issue is harder than dealing with low voltages.
post #82 of 568
Hi everybody, I've got a couple of questions. I was wondering If I can use only a 9V battery to power the pimeta and if the answer is positive, if I can solder the cable of the battery clip in the holes labeled wall.
Another thing, I can't realize how and where I can solder the I/O jacks.

Sorry, I'm a biiiiiiiiiig noob.
Already read about 5 times the tangentsoft guide.
post #83 of 568
The unit can use 5v-30v depending on your parts you picked out. If you had 600 ohm beirs then 9v isnt good enough and you would have made a 30v unit. On the other hand if you had 16-32 cans then 9v is enough for you to go deaf

So no you are not limited to a 9v battery

Wall on the board refers to a external unregulated power source that is higher in voltage then your battery. Wall runs thru a diode and UC1 regulator to both power the unit and charge the battery.

If your going to make one without abattery, then soldering your power supply to wall is a good idea.

However soldering a battery to wall is a bad idea. It will go dead pretty quickly.

Solder your outs to OL,OR,OG. Output left, output right, and output groud. Dont let output ground touch chassis ground.

Solder your inputs to InputsiL,InputsiR,InputsiG. They are in one spot in the middle labeled IL,IR,IG.
post #84 of 568
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightanole View Post
The unit can use 5v-30v depending on your parts you picked out. If you had 600 ohm beirs then 9v isnt good enough and you would have made a 30v unit. On the other hand if you had 16-32 cans then 9v is enough for you to go deaf

So no you are not limited to a 9v battery

Wall on the board refers to a external unregulated power source that is higher in voltage then your battery. Wall runs thru a diode and UC1 regulator to both power the unit and charge the battery.

If your going to make one without abattery, then soldering your power supply to wall is a good idea.

However soldering a battery to wall is a bad idea. It will go dead pretty quickly.

Solder your outs to OL,OR,OG. Output left, output right, and output groud. Dont let output ground touch chassis ground.

Solder your inputs to InputsiL,InputsiR,InputsiG. They are in one spot in the middle labeled IL,IR,IG.
Ok great, for now I've got only a 9V battery and a battery clip with only the red and the black cable, where do I have to solder these two cables?
The ground should be the wood table because I don't want to build the enclosure. Is it good enough?
post #85 of 568
You dont have to ground anything. However if you have a metal case, you dont want the input ground to be touching the outputground.

Your battery clip with a red and black cable is called a "pigtail" if you want to call it by its real name.

9V Battery Pigtail - Autocom America

Solder your pigtail to your battery in on the unit "-bat+" next to wall. Red goes to + and black to -.
post #86 of 568
Ok, now the problem is: where do I have to solder the toogle switch and the big problem are the jacks.
I bought two kind of jacks, this kind 35RAPC4BH3 Switchcraft Audio/Video Connectors is strange because it has more than 3 pins so I don't know how to solder it.
The second type is this one N112BPCX Switchcraft Audio/Video Connectors
do I have to solder the pins soldering any order or it makes no difference?
post #87 of 568
Ok install the toggle switch on the red wire. So it should go red wire, toggle switch, then to the unit.

Your 35rap style connector is a switched type, thats why it has more then 3 connectors. Odds are it has 5. Its used when you have a internal and external music source. When there isnt a jack in the plug, 2 sets of pins are shorted together so the sound is coming from inside the unit. When you plug in your external source, then the switch is broken and the internal sound is cut off and the plug will feed the sound from your external source.

I would go with your N112 connector for both your in and out if you can. Its real easy to solder to and only as 3 prongs.

Now for soldering the thing. You have 3 terminals, tip, ring, and sleeve. Tip is left, ring is right, and sleeve is ground. If you dont have a multimeter then this is gonna be kind of tough to figure out. You have to get sleeve right, worse case if you get ring and tip mixed up is that you have to put your head phone on backwards

HeadWize - Headphone FAQs
post #88 of 568
I've got 2 N112 but the pins have got little holes and I can't understand which one is right or left.
Another thing: the toogle switch has got two pins with holes, if the red wire is only one, how can I solder with one wire the switch and the pcb?

EDIT:
Ok maybe I've understood which one is the right and which the left. As soon as I plug in the headphone plug in the jack I can see a little "draft" the touches the ring and another that touchs the tip.
Now the problem is the toogle switch, then I can start soldering.
post #89 of 568
I cant help you understand. You have 3 pins with holes, they are left right and ground, but i cant tell you which is which because i dont have that plug in front of me. From the looks of things, looking at the back of the plug, the shaved off corner pin is sleeve, the one clock wise of the shaved corner is ring, and the one counter clockwise of the shaved corner is tip.

As for the switch. You solder the red wire to one pin, then another wire to other pin. You then run the other wire to the "+" of the batt in.
post #90 of 568
OK great, thank u so much. As soon as I finish to solder and it works I'll tell you.

Cheers!
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