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What was the last movie you watched? - Page 7

post #91 of 456
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by archosman
Ever seen ?
Hey, that looks pretty good. Four stars from allmovieguide. Let me check into it.

edit: Criterion collection, interview with the director..., my kind of movie. Thanks for the recommendation archosman.

post #92 of 456

Re: Gods and Generals

Quote:
Originally posted by JMedeiros
I just watched the first hour and could not stand any more...back in the Film Caddy return envelope.

Gorgeous credit sequence..The script sounded as if everybody was quoting scripture from a pulpit...or being lectured to by a orator who loves the sound of his voice. Contstantly. Like "My lines carry the most important message in this film...so you better listen" So I started to look at the set and design details instead (which are authentic and beautiful) then got so distracted I turned it off.
John
I didn't find this movie all that bad but it did bore me a bit, particularly in the 2nd half of the movie...the Fredricksburg battle sequence was pretty well done but the movie got so bogged down by too much grandiose dialogue in particular by Gen Jackson (Stephan Lang, who played Gen. Picket in Gettysburg)...i agree the actors frequently looked like they were reading verbatim from the script and sounded amateurish at times...Still i think they did a decent job overall...Hopefully "The Last Full Measure" will end the trilogy on a good note...
post #93 of 456
Quote:
Originally posted by fewtch
2001: A Space Odyssey (recently got it on DVD as a birthday present).

I just can't believe it when people find this movie "boring." Slow and contemplative it is, visually poetic, philosophically deep and nuanced, stunningly ambitious, even musically enjoyable. "Boring?" It's one of the all-time great films, in my opinion.

BTW, I enjoy the lighter stuff as much as anything else... my favorite genre is probably sci-fi, but I like almost all of it. Scorsese-style gangster flicks rule...
2001 has long been a favorite of mine and remains one of the finest made sci-fi ever...the movie set new standards of FX...as are some Kubrik movies 2001 can be confusing and enigmatic at times but this recipe worked out well in this case...The soundtrack is very nice and is to say the least unique for such a subject matter but it also worked out extremely well...i still have the soundtrack album on LP
post #94 of 456

Re: Re: Gods and Generals

Quote:
Originally posted by Nightfall
John,


I loved Gettysburg, which is unquestionably a great film but reacted to this the same way you did, one hour and back in its case to return to the video store. What a terrible disappointment.


JC
I also really loved Gettysburg and had high hopes for this one. Hopefully as Squirt suggested, the third in the trilogy will be back on track.

John
post #95 of 456
While I do quite like _Branded to Kill_, I prefer _Tokyo Drifter_ by the same director. The level of camp and artificiality is greater, the Samurai/Gangster 60s pastiche, more stylized.

Nice to see the discussion return to film literacy again, after systematic derailment through useless assessments of films based on butt-stupid ratings of the attractiveness of actresses by people who no doubt yell similar opinions on street-corners as random women pass. Class act, boys. Do visit this fine establishment again.
post #96 of 456
Sweet Jesus Christ...

I just watched The Boondock Saints last night.

Willem Dafoe...

That scene is scarred into my mind. I will never be able to forget that.

I don't know how I got to sleep last night.

- Chris
post #97 of 456
I'm going to buy this as soon as I find it. I did see Pistol Opera... which I hated.




Quote:
Originally posted by scrypt
While I do quite like _Branded to Kill_, I prefer _Tokyo Drifter_ by the same director. The level of camp and artificiality is greater, the Samurai/Gangster 60s pastiche, more stylized.

Nice to see the discussion return to film literacy again, after systematic derailment through useless assessments of films based on butt-stupid ratings of the attractiveness of actresses by people who no doubt yell similar opinions on street-corners as random women pass. Class act, boys. Do visit this fine establishment again.
post #98 of 456
When I bought this computer with a DVD drive, my first DVD player, I checked out a lot of movies from the library. I enjoyed both Branded to a Kill and Tokyo Drifter. Another '60s Japanese movie I really like is called Giants and Toys
post #99 of 456
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by scrypt
While I do quite like _Branded to Kill_, I prefer _Tokyo Drifter_ by the same director. The level of camp and artificiality is greater, the Samurai/Gangster 60s pastiche, more stylized.
Thanks for the recommendation scrypt. I'm going to check this one out too.
post #100 of 456

Jesus' Son

Quirky, dark and well acted comic drama staring Billy Crudup about the zany adventures of being a theif & heroin addict in the 70s.

Ultimately a story of discovering one's own humanity and real connection with others.

Lots of great cameos and cool 70s compilation soundtrack.


post #101 of 456
Hadn't been to the movies in a while, so I saw American Pie: The wedding, and then I saw T3. wanted to see that on the big screen before it finnished... didn't mind it actually... but there were some pretty cheesy part... like the star glasses (a la Elton John...)
post #102 of 456
Austin Powers In Goldmember...it was average but really lacked the wackyness or it just replayed some of the same wackyness of previous AP movies...but it was worth seeing just to see Britney Spears's head blow up...
post #103 of 456

Once upon a Director's Sense of Timing

Once upon a Time in America

I've dubbed this film A Fistful of Mahler for several reasons:-- Mahler's and Leone's last works both seem deliberate and interminable until you understand exactly why the artist lingers; the ending seems forced and provisional the first time, painstakingly allusive and exquisitely paced the next. Every note, every motion, is given its own breath and breadth. Leone's America's nostalgia is tempered with restraint in a way that Visconti's Death in Venice's is not. For that reason, Leone's voice is more evocative of late Mahler than over-the-top Visconti's can ever be.

There is a point in America in which a certain character emerges from prison to step into a hearse which, though it promises satisfaction (the french term is "petit mort"), proves equally confining. Keep that in mind when you absorb the end of the film; pay attention to the various scissions and sparks of resonance. Wrested out of chronological sequence and evoked rather than resolved, America's threads are not merely tied, as they would be in a linear commercial film. They sound and die away, like so many sympathetic strings. Like points in the memory that are all the more poignant because they don't quite intersect.

(Leone's use of time is seminal: without Once upon a Time in America, Pulp Fiction's karoake-experimental narrative wouldn't even exist.)

Another virtue: The Jewish gangsters aren't simply allowed to be consistently good/bad in the sense that they follow some arbitrary code that passes for criminal ethics. No, the most sympathetic character in the film commits slimy and selfish acts without ever owning up, which is far more creditable for me than The Godfather's Shakespearean tragic hero (Brando), who just doesn't belong in a believable film about the Mafia because he is far too true to his conscience. Besides, a good auteur crime film needs ludicrous amoral perversity to work against the familiar prescriptive Little-Caesar-tragic arc. That tonal balancing act is something that Sergio Leone always managed to pull off, though Coppola never did.

If you can suspend your need for fast pacing as you do when you listen to classical/electronic music or even slow dub, try to take in Leone's film in that way. Consider Leone a cinematic Satchmo: other directors aspire to expansiveness and lyricism through processions of faux-grand gestures; they succeed only in being stylized and mannered. Leone actually achieves said sweep. He does it by creating his own idiosyncratic sense of time while never violating certain Aristotelian principles of continuity. (Notice the excellent use of the rising elevator at the beginning of America and you'll understand why I have spatial continuity issues with certain of Peter Jackson's transitions in The Fellowship of the Ring.)
post #104 of 456
Thread Starter 
Wow, as always great review scrypt. I'm going to check this one out.

edit: Robert De Niro, James Woods, Danny Aiello, how did I miss this one? Looks like the two disc set comes with the directors cut also, the original 227 minutes vice the 139 U.S. release.
post #105 of 456

Saving Private Ryan

It's all been said.


watched it on my portable to try the Sony MDR7506 to see how they did with complicated film soundtracks. Passed with flying colors. Crisp dialogue....didn't miss a word among the pyro effects.



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