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What was the last movie you watched? - Page 9

post #121 of 456
After Scrypt's post I'm embarrassed to admit this: "Lilo and Stich".

Well, I have kids, you see...
post #122 of 456
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by chadbang
[B]After Scrypt's post I'm embarrassed to admit this: "Lilo and Stich".

Well, I have kids, you see...
Nah, that's a great animated story. I especially like the soundtrack and the Kamehameha Schools' Children's Chorus. I somehow had two dvds and just sold one.

post #123 of 456
Did you stay till the very end & see the surprise?


Quote:
Originally posted by JMT
Yesterday I took the family to see "Pirates of the Caribbean." What a fun movie, great effects, great soundtrack (gotta pick that one up), a lot of action. And Johnny Depp's character absolutely made the movie.
post #124 of 456
I saw the "Pirates" last weekend. The movie was alittle too long for me so we left when the credits rolled. I didn't know there was a surprise
post #125 of 456

The Hunted

I really enjoyed it. Kind of like The Fugitive Meets The Predator without the Sci-Fi or Harrison Ford.

Great knife fight sequences and solid performances by both leads.

post #126 of 456
Thread Starter 
Ran. The Stephen Prince commentary is much better than Peter Grilli's. I think this is the first Kurosawa movie with a special effect (not counting arterial spurts), and that lasted a few seconds.



edit: link
post #127 of 456
Quote:
Originally posted by archosman
Hey... for being shot on DV I was damned impressed... & I hate feature film on DV...
I like the girtty DV quality in the film.. and i thought it was shot very well.. reminds me of falling down.. which incidently was also about rage.
post #128 of 456
Quote:
Originally posted by chadbang
After Scrypt's post I'm embarrassed to admit this: "Lilo and Stich".
I'm certain you know me at this point, Chadbang, but for the sake of any who don't: My point is never to make anyone feel small but to suggest options which excite me and which many people might not know about. I've been a studio rat my whole life, never had to hold a day job until now, and I can understand why people would take pleasure in films, music and books that aren't aesthetically rarefied. Perhaps some of us come home feeling exhausted and want to connect to something immediately pleasurable or cathartic; perhaps some haven't had time to get to know certain kinds of art and don't feel comfortable exploring (some people are actually afraid that they'll be bored). I blame that on a culture that *won't* make time for art, not on individuals who *can't* make time, whose level of involvement is dictated by the time afforded by their economy, culture and class.

If you speak to a Polish cleaning woman past the age of forty, you'll be amazed to find she knows Polish avant garde literature and music intimately. It isn't that she's smarter than the average American. It's just that, whatever its other disadvantages, Poland teaches religiously the aesthetic/spiritual/educational/hedonistic value of art.

I always beg my friends who have kids to put books of great paintings on the coffee table or within easy reach. I always hope they'll play forbidding works of music when it's dinner time and keep art and poetry around the house, so that kids learn not to be intimidated or alienated by such things. My parents did that for me, which is why, when I go to the Met, I'm always among old friends. I hope future generations of Americans will be allowed to feel that way, too.

I haven't a problem with kids seeing kid's films. But I also want them to have Olde Tyme kiddie fare (like E. Nesbitt's _The Cockatoucan_), fine art, classical music and challenging surrealist films, too.
post #129 of 456


This time on tv, home alone, lights off, my headphones on. It was a MUCH better experience than watching it in a cinema with a bunch of friends couple of years ago. We argued a lot after the movie. Some people had obviously expected another "Helloween" or something and what they saw dissapointed them quite a bit...Very nice peace of work, IMO.
post #130 of 456

Identity

A great cast of actors I like alot...really interesting premise, but I figured it out pretty quickly...moody but predictable mystery. Still a fun evening of scares.

post #131 of 456
I liked Blair Witch. I thought it put a new spin on the horror genre and I have to admire anything that can broaden a genre, even if it's still a formula.

Of course, when it comes down to it, the film was nothing more than a natural cross between Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Quake... but I dug it.

I remember having an idiot friend trying to tell me that it wasn't real and how mad he was at me when I referred to him as an idiot for needing to discover that.
post #132 of 456
Quote:
Originally posted by archosman
Did you stay till the very end & see the surprise?
Yep, my son had seen it before, so he made us stay through the credits. I have NEVER stayed through the credits in my life.
post #133 of 456


John Wayne, Red Buttons, two pretty girls, the African velt, one home made rocket, 100 monkeys, & three baby elephants. Music by Henry Mancini.

I'd like to get the DVD, but I know as soon as I do, they'll come out with a special edition with a bunch of bonus material.
post #134 of 456
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by scrypt
While I do quite like _Branded to Kill_, I prefer _Tokyo Drifter_ by the same director. The level of camp and artificiality is greater, the Samurai/Gangster 60s pastiche, more stylized.
Quote:
Originally posted by archosman
Ever seen ?
Just got these two and so far I watched Tokyo Drifter. Pretty funny movie. I guess I equated yakuza with tattoos and missing fingers. Back then it must have been running around with a suit and tie. Great interview with Seijun Suzuki.
post #135 of 456
Here's a key word for you to keep in mind when taking recommendations, fractus2: *camp*. A movie that's being called camp is a movie that's not to be taken completely seriously. I've an interior designer friend who would doubtless giggle himself to death at Tokyo Drifter, but I suspect he'd love the art direction.

One movie I'm certain he'd love: Bava's *Danger, Diabolik*.

I like movies that can enjoyed on a camp level but respected in serious ways as well. For me, Suzuki's best films are like that. He's one of the few directors who can be intentionally campy and pull it off.

The 80s were all about people discovering that an earnest Argento film works better as camp than a self-conscious Troma film. The same holds true for the various other incarnations of cynical deliberate bad from that time (and this).
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