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Long awaited Smyth SVS Realiser NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE - Page 174

post #2596 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_M View Post
 

Thanks, that's interesting. I didn't know about DTS 5.1 CDs. I'm not planning on buying a Realiser but I have a Marantz receiver with Dolby Headphone which can produce great virtualisations of 7.1 channel sound. I'd be interested in listening to some music through it.

 

Hi John,

 

Have you fully understand what the Realiser does ? 

 

I mean it's not supposed to create anything to play music in 5.1 or 7.1.

 

What it does is capturing speakers and room acoustic, and reproduce those into a pair of headphones.

 

If you're listening a stereo file, the Realiser will play Stereo. No addition. 

 

 

I've been using the Dolby Headphone of my Yamaha receiver for some time, and it canno't be compared with what the Realiser does (even if it is usefull indeed, and almost free as it's in most receivers), in term of spatialisation. 

 

I've also been using the Sony 7.1 headphone system (MDR DS7500). It does better than the Dolby headphone, but still canno't compete with the realiser.

post #2597 of 2721
Hi French - yes, I do understand what the Realiser does. It applies a Dolby Headphone style algorithm to multichannel sound to produce a 2 channel virtualisation of the sound, with the additional benefits of tailoring the virtualisation to your ears plus the head tracker. There would potentially be benefits to using it with a 2 channel stereo source but they would be very limited. It needs a source recorded in surround to really show its full capabilities. Such sources are easy to obtain for movies but far harder to obtain for music - hence my query.
post #2598 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_M View Post

Hi French - yes, I do understand what the Realiser does. It applies a Dolby Headphone style algorithm to multichannel sound to produce a 2 channel virtualisation of the sound, with the additional benefits of tailoring the virtualisation to your ears plus the head tracker. There would potentially be benefits to using it with a 2 channel stereo source but they would be very limited. It needs a source recorded in surround to really show its full capabilities. Such sources are easy to obtain for movies but far harder to obtain for music - hence my query.

 

I wouldn't say it's "Dolby Headphone style algorithm having additional benefits". It's an algorithm (in a nutshell: convolution) recording a room and speakers exactly as is. Only thing they have in common is they "virtualize".

 

Even with 2 channel stereo, all the "benefits" are there, when you compare listening to speakers vs headphones. Some people even refuse to use headphones without some form of crossfeed to reduce the unnatural L/R separation. Simulating real speakers in a room includes the natural crossfeed, also any room decay etc.

post #2599 of 2721
Your Yamaha/ Sony are doing the same thing - virtualising a multichannel source, only worse than the Realiser. I think Yamaha use their own Silent Cinema tech rather than DH. I'd add that stereo sound can be upmixed to multichannel but clearly the results won't be as good as with a true multichannel source.
post #2600 of 2721
Hekeli - I agree with all that but do people really purchase something as expensive as the A8 purely to simulate a 2 speaker setup? Sorry if I'm showing my ignorance? smily_headphones1.gif
post #2601 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_M View Post

Hekeli - I agree with all that but do people really purchase something as expensive as the A8 purely to simulate a 2 speaker setup? Sorry if I'm showing my ignorance? smily_headphones1.gif

 

If you read this thread, yes. Some people also buy $5000 headphones just for the heck of it. If you have the money, why not? You can not get the same specific speaker/room simulation from anywhere else. Other software gimmicks are more or less worse quality, simulating some random parameters.

post #2602 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_M View Post

Hi French - yes, I do understand what the Realiser does. It applies a Dolby Headphone style algorithm to multichannel sound to produce a 2 channel virtualisation of the sound, with the additional benefits of tailoring the virtualisation to your ears plus the head tracker. There would potentially be benefits to using it with a 2 channel stereo source but they would be very limited. It needs a source recorded in surround to really show its full capabilities. Such sources are easy to obtain for movies but far harder to obtain for music - hence my query.

 

So you almost undertand the real benefit of the Realiser.  :smile:

 

Or to be exact, I guess you have fully understood what it does, but don't realise how well it does that. :D

 

It's the multichannel thing that bothers me.

 

What the Realiser does, should probably be integrated into a receiver, as Dolby Headphones or Silent Cinema have been.

It would cost a lost more, but the idea is pretty much the same : try not to be locked into a pairs of cans.

 

But it is not only a Home Theater enthousiast product.

It's also a very interesting hifi product.

I will not even mention what it could bring to a recording studio.

 

I personnally spend more time enjoying music (stereo) on my realiser, than watching movies (5.1).

It does replace my installation, simple as that.

 

 

 

post #2603 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by The French View Post
 

 

So you almost undertand the real benefit of the Realiser.  :smile:

 

Or to be exact, I guess you have fully understood what it does, but don't realise how well it does that. :D

 

It's the multichannel thing that bothers me.

 

What the Realiser does, should probably be integrated into a receiver, as Dolby Headphones or Silent Cinema have been.

It would cost a lost more, but the idea is pretty much the same : try not to be locked into a pairs of cans.

 

But it is not only a Home Theater enthousiast product.

It's also a very interesting hifi product.

I will not even mention what it could bring to a recording studio.

 

I personnally spend more time enjoying music (stereo) on my realiser, than watching movies (5.1).

It does replace my installation, simple as that.

 

 

 


I haven't heard the Realiser so I guess I can't fully appreciate it but I have heard several times about how amazing it is. My Marantz 7.1 receiver w/ Dolby Headphone sounds great - and the Realiser must be on a different level.

 

Certainly if I owned one, I'd be buying some music tracks recorded in 7.1 surround to let it showcase its full abilities. ;)

 

And try watching movies in 7.1 rather than 5.1 (you'd need to output Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-Master over HDMI to the Realiser - both are 7.1 sources) - I for one can definitely hear the difference. Sorry if you know all this (and more) already - you mention 5.1 which suggests you may be listening to lower quality source material.

post #2604 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by hekeli View Post
 

 

If you read this thread, yes. Some people also buy $5000 headphones just for the heck of it. If you have the money, why not? You can not get the same specific speaker/room simulation from anywhere else. Other software gimmicks are more or less worse quality, simulating some random parameters.

 

Well, if you have the money, then - as you say - why not? :)

 

Still, surely the designers must have envisaged/ hoped that it would be used for slightly more than this...

post #2605 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_M View Post
 

Still, surely the designers must have envisaged/ hoped that it would be used for slightly more than this...

 

I believe a large part of the purpose was for recording studios to use it on the go or at home, or simulating one set of speakers for many engineers to use at the same time... there are so many scenarios where it can be useful. But yes the high cost may be a large factor in consumer usage.

post #2606 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by John_M View Post
 


I haven't heard the Realiser so I guess I can't fully appreciate it but I have heard several times about how amazing it is. My Marantz 7.1 receiver w/ Dolby Headphone sounds great - and the Realiser must be on a different level.

 

Certainly if I owned one, I'd be buying some music tracks recorded in 7.1 surround to let it showcase its full abilities. ;)

 

And try watching movies in 7.1 rather than 5.1 (you'd need to output Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD-Master over HDMI to the Realiser - both are 7.1 sources) - I for one can definitely hear the difference. Sorry if you know all this (and more) already - you mention 5.1 which suggests you may be listening to lower quality source material.

 

Well, I work in the video industry, so I know 7.1 are better than 5.1...at least when the source is 7.1. :D

 

It's kind of funny to know that there is only 1 center channel, where most of the sound goes, and 2 back channels, with only 5% of the soundtrack.

 

 

But anyway, you're right, 7.1 is technically better. Thing is, my system, and those I've been able to record, are 5.1 only.

I need to find a good 7.1 installation, that match my listening room, to record their 7.1 sound.

post #2607 of 2721

Yes, how much better 7.1 is than 5.1 depends on how much additional data there is in the two back channels, which varies a lot between movies. Some have lots, others barely any at all.

 

However, I wasn't just thinking about the two extra channels - I was also thinking that if you are listening to movies in 5.1 then you might be playing Dolby Digital or DTS 5.1 sources. The issue with this wouldn't just be that the sources have fewer channels, but also that they are lower quality than DTS HD Master Audio or Dolby TrueHD.

post #2608 of 2721

There seems to be some confusion about the benefits of the Realiser.  I'm not sure if the confusion is among those who have never used it.  In any case, I thought I would say how and why I find it an incredible product.

 

We moved from a large house to a small one.  Instead of a spacious listening room I have a 10 by 10 by 8 bedroom in which I can have my music setup.  I tried many room treatments to improve the listening experience, including even having a top of the line room tuner who works with AIX, etc. work on my room.  Improvements were very modest.  When I heard about the Realiser I thought that this might be a solution for me.  I can obtain measurements in a fine professional level listening room with top-of-the-line equipment, and then, so to speak, emulate this room in my tiny room via the Realiser and Stax headset.  This is exactly how I use the Realiser, not for movies, but for music.  I listen to both 2-channel and 5.1 music via this setup.  

 

Why do I use a Realiser for 2-channel?  Simply because I am able to recreate the experience of listening to music in a perfectly balanced listening room over very high performance gear for the modest price of a little over $3000.  Currently I don't even use an amplifier, but simply connect the Realiser to to the inputs of my Oppo transport.  Yes, 5.1 adds a whole different level.  I do love the surround experience.  However, more important is the quality of the original recording.  Many stereo or SACD discs provide excellent experiences.  In fact, my own opinion is that while super high resolution is terrific, ultimately it's the quality of the master that counts.  I have some redbook stereo discs that compare very favorably in terms of spatialization and sound stage to some lesser surround discs.  There is a small selection of blueray, or DVD-A, or other multi-channel discs which have both, the superior source plus the surround experience and resolution.  Of course, these are wonderful.  But for any of my recordings, the experience of listening by way of the Realiser far surpasses anything I could achieve in this room by means of room tweaking or otherwise.

 

I should add that I have had the good fortune of being able to obtain PRIRs (personal calibrations) in some top-of-the-line listening rooms over gear costing many tens of thousands of dollars.  This is not always easy to achieve, and is a definite limitation of the Realiser.  It takes patience, perseverance, and some luck to find those willing to allow you to do these measurements in their shops or studios.  Without this, the Realiser would be of little use to me.

post #2609 of 2721

Guys, I've been happily using the Realiser for some time, having bought it from a fellow Head-Fi'er here. I didn't have time to make my own PRIR yet, but I've found a couple PRIR's from the SD card I got that seems to work well with my head and ears.

 

However, for some reason, the default PRIR (that comes default in the factory) doesn't seem to work. Every time I try to load it, there is an error. Has this happened to anyone else? Maybe that particular PRIR file became corrupted for some reason?

 

If that is the case, would anyone here kindly let me know where I could re-download this default PRIR file, or perhaps share it with me (via email)? I'm pretty sure every Smyth Realiser owner would own this file (as it was already there from factory setting) unless he deleted it.

post #2610 of 2721
Quote:
Originally Posted by songmic View Post
 

would anyone here kindly let me know where I could re-download this default PRIR file

 

Read the PRIR thread how to find lots of PRIRs.. you can find the default from Hoax-folder.

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/610920/smyth-svs-realiser-prir-exchange-thread#post_8397820

 

(hint: green text)

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