or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Summit-Fi (High-End Audio) › High-end Audio Forum › Long awaited Smyth SVS Realiser NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Long awaited Smyth SVS Realiser NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE - Page 167

post #2491 of 2821

Quick question for Smyth/Oppo users here: If I am using the Smyth w/ only analog inputs-am I going to be able to feed a 7.1 HDMI signal (Xbox 360 for instance)-IN to the Oppo 103, then send that full signal OUT via the Oppo analogs?

 

-Daniel

post #2492 of 2821
Quote:
Originally Posted by BournePerfect View Post
 

Quick question for Smyth/Oppo users here: If I am using the Smyth w/ only analog inputs-am I going to be able to feed a 7.1 HDMI signal (Xbox 360 for instance)-IN to the Oppo 103, then send that full signal OUT via the Oppo analogs?

 

-Daniel

 

You won't be able to unless you have the BDP-105.  Only the 105 is able to decode 7.1 HDMI.  The 105 is a jack of all trades and a master of many.

post #2493 of 2821

ARGH-really?? I thought the better dac and hp out were the only differences....plans...foiled. :(

 

-Daniel

post #2494 of 2821

Been listening to speakers again after the Realiser, definintely headphones still cannot image like speakers can, even with the Realiser.

post #2495 of 2821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackmumba View Post
 

Been listening to speakers again after the Realiser, definintely headphones still cannot image like speakers can, even with the Realiser.

thats funny. i have to say that i came to the opposite conclusion after spending the last two weeks with speakers at my place to do new measurements. i did about 15 prirs in 6.1, 7.1 and 2.1 from a physical 2.1 setup. after about 2 years without the direct comparison to physical speakers i somewhat had the assumption to have to switch back to speakers again with all their drawbacks after hearing them. besides the measurements, the main point was to closely check off how much of a difference the tactile or physical response of a real speaker makes. to be short... for me its hardly discernable. and i not even had coupled my new measurements with the ibeam transducer. after several years of pure 5.1 i was shocked about the great deal of extra back field space added by one or two backsurrounds. you can temporarily tweak your room acoustics, looking for a sweetspot of the speakers and do a nice measurement which will accurately reproduce the listening experience. i think many people make a big mistake in going only to very expensive and professional mixing studios. yes it is a nice way of using the possibilities of the product. but let me say this. first of all if i playback at home i somewhat constantly be aware of the effect, that i am not hearing the room in which i am sitting. so in other words for me the illusion gets even more perfect when i hear through a prir of the room i am actually in. without sounding to esoterical but the virtual room somewhat transients into the real room especially with open headphones. another big advantage: you can do a wide variety of setups. for example i think it is very nice to be able to choose between different surround positioning angles simply by choosing a different preset button. i've never before had a product which was able to amazes me that much after 2 years of usage by increasing sound performance and flexibility. so in that term it is the best purchase i've done so far even if it is a little pricey. you really have to be able to compare to the real listening environment to fully appreciate what the realiser accomplishs. its nice getting excited to reexperience the finest pics of your film, music and games library again. the next big test will be to see what the upcoming flagship generation of headphones (akg k812, audeze lcd-x and lcd-xc) can add to even further enhance the experience.

post #2496 of 2821

Yes BUT, your still wearing these flaming things on your head :), they get hot and stuffy, there heavy, they move around, you get a soar kneck, and headphones are not so good for your ears either. There could be other side effects having transducers so close to your brain. These are the main reasons I moved on from the Realiser despite it being such an amazing product as it is.

 

After a while I just got over wearing headphones.


Edited by Blackmumba - 10/5/13 at 5:31pm
post #2497 of 2821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackmumba View Post
 

Yes BUT, your still wearing these flaming things on your head :), they get hot and stuffy, there heavy, they move around, you get a soar kneck, and headphones are not so good for your ears either. There could be other side effects having transducers so close to your brain. These are the main reasons I moved on from the Realiser despite it being such an amazing product as it is.

 

After a while I just got over wearing headphones.

that really depends on the headphones ;)

but youre right in stating that especially the high end headphones have to be be way more comfortable. i've tested audeze, hifiman, stax, sennheiser and so on. the only top tier headphone with long time listening comfort is the beyerdynamic t1. 

for me i am tending to hear with a louder level through speakers because its harder to blend out the background noise. which relates to the other advantage of headphones, that you can get more easily immersed because you're aware of the fact, that you're not treating anyone else with your sound. when i am watching an action romp with speakers i always have to worry about neighbors.

post #2498 of 2821

I couldn't resist to show you the pic of our beloved "mad professor" Mike Smyth (at left) with his wonder child below

 

Zdjęcie: Irlande, le week-end dernier : visite de travail avec Mike Smyth (à gauche), le co-inventeur du Smyth Realiser A8 avec son frère Stephen (présent, mais pas sur la photo...).

post #2499 of 2821
Quote:
Originally Posted by travis-bickle View Post
 

that really depends on the headphones ;)

but youre right in stating that especially the high end headphones have to be be way more comfortable. i've tested audeze, hifiman, stax, sennheiser and so on. the only top tier headphone with long time listening comfort is the beyerdynamic t1. 

for me i am tending to hear with a louder level through speakers because its harder to blend out the background noise. which relates to the other advantage of headphones, that you can get more easily immersed because you're aware of the fact, that you're not treating anyone else with your sound. when i am watching an action romp with speakers i always have to worry about neighbors.

 

Has anyone tried the Stax SRS-002 or 003 IEM's with the Realiser? I have never heard them, but from the comments from owners, they say that without the headband, the drivers are so light that it doesn't feel like you have any headphones on at all. I was thinking that this would be the "holy grail" if you could have headphones light enough that you didn't notice them on your head or in your ears AND you are also hearing sound coming from out in the room. The illusion would be complete.

 

Of course, if you wanted the head tracking, then you would have to figure out a way to attach that to your head. :-(

post #2500 of 2821

I've had my SVS PB12-NSD subwoofer for quite a while, strangely I haven't tried it with Realiser until now...

 

Just watched Pacific Rim, damn it sounded good. HD800 with body slamming subbass is a great combo. :D No need to even think of building a "real" speaker setup..

 

(Made some room changes and sold my O300's so I'm kind of back to Headphones)

post #2501 of 2821

How many folks wear the head tracker? After using it when I first got my Realiser now I have found that I hear a lifelike sound without needing the tracker on my head. Am I missing anything by not using it?

post #2502 of 2821
I never use the headtracker, it si more enjoyable to be always in the top spot.
post #2503 of 2821
Thread Starter 

This is really a tough one.  My own personal habit is also NOT to use the headtracker, but simply to have the soundfield "fixed and frozen" on my head no matter where my head is pointing.

 

Early on while still trying to use it I found that I was constantly looking up from my TV screen to peer at the two green lights on the HT receiver to be sure that they were both on, thus ensuring that my "virtual soundfield" was properly "centered" and that my L/R virtual positioning was correct... i.e. that my head was facing straight ahead in that original listening environment and that I was [theoretically] experiencing that same virtual sensation now through the PRIR and headphones.

 

In fact, I was so distracted by constantly looking at the HT receiver green LED's that I was no longer watching the onscreen TV program enjoyably.  Furthermore, my neck was beginning to strain and tire while constantly trying to keep my head upright and centered so that those two green lights would stay lit.  I decided I might as well just eliminate the HT completely, and ALWAYS have the soundfield "center-pinned" to my head so that no matter what my head position if my eyes are closed the speakers are always dead-center in front of me with L/R and surround positions glued to my head.  If I move or turn or rotate my head, the soundfield moves with it.

 

Now this might not have been how SVS was designed or intended to be used.  In fact, the HT was supposed to "UN-HOOK" the sound field from your head, so that the sound field remained "virtually stationary" as you turned/rotated your head so that your brain understands your head is turning and the resulting sound is changing... theoretically exactly as happens in the true real original listening environment.  But duplicating the "stationary sound position" relative to your head, theoretically this convinces your brain even more that this is a "real" virtual-surround listening environment through the headphones.  Presumably the virtual surround environment-duplicating experience would be even that much more strong with this implementation.

 

And it's probably true.  Except I'm really watching a movie or HDTV on my screen, and I just want to not be that concerned or distracted with my precise head angle or position so that it strains my neck to keep it locked so that my head is straight ahead 100% of the time so that the sound I'm hearing is always as if I were looking straight ahead in the theater room.  Although it might now be more like other "static virtual surround" technologies (e.g. Dolby Headphone), I find that for many/most/all purposes it's perfectly acceptable to work that way.

 

I have TWO Realiser setups, one of which is my original analog Realiser setup now "re-purposed" and in place at my dual-monitor computer where my "straight-ahead" monitor is entirely for work-related windows and tasks, and when I'm not using my "to-the-left" monitor for secondary work-related windows it is almost always being used for Windows Media Center to watch HDTV recording (this machine is also my HTPC/DVR).  And I'm wearing headphones while I watch something via WMC, with my old analog Realiser and old Stax SR-Omega/SRM-T1S headphone system fed from the optical output of my sound card through my old Yamaha RX-V863 receiver.  It would really would be impossible to implement an HT to be effective in this environment, as although I often turn to the left to actually watch whatever program is being played through WMC, I'm constantly looking down at something I'm working on or otherwise kind of just using what's onscreen through WMC as "background noise".  This is certainly the case if the HDTV program being played is a news or talk or reality or entertainment program, rather than a dramatic series or HBO/SHO movie.  I really want my Realiser headphone setup while at my HTPC to provide much more dramatic, clear, and enjoyable sound than would be the case if I were to listen through my "quad audio" computer audio setup and 4.1 Altec-Lansing audio system speakers (which are good, but it's not true 5.1 or 7.1).

 

Bottom line: although Stephen Smyth and Lorr Kramer may call this "heresy", and it seems inappropriate to say "it's good enough", but quite frankly I get so much enjoyment out of the accuracy of SVS (from my AIX PRIR) and its gigantic improvement in "virtual but realistic surround-sound" effect over something like Dolby Headphone, that it's honestly now more than a matter of [in-]convenience to not use the HT.  I'm now just used to using the equipment this way, and the resulting "straight-ahead listening" that it forces, and quite frankly I appreciate the soundfield being "stuck to my head" when it drops or turns or whatever.  No distractions of a "floating soundfield" which might even MUTE if I move beyond the outer boundaries of the HT.

 

Doesn't a professional sound mixer person working on his home computer with the Realiser have the same issues with head position?  What's wrong with just closing your eyes and your brain believing you're listening to the sound as if your head were pointing straight-ahead?  Or, if a slight head turn or tilt occurs while watching a video onscreen, is it really desirable to affect that straight-ahead sound that is being worked on?  I don't know, but I don't think so.

 

Count me on the list of "home users" who do NOT use the HT in my every day usage of two Realisers in two rather different watching/listening setups.

post #2504 of 2821

Well said, never really used it either.

post #2505 of 2821

I don't use it either. 1) I find that I get distracted by the lights and the effect itself. I think it does the opposite of what it's intended, which is convince your brain of the virtual setup. When you are constantly aware that a sensor is adjusting the audio you get preoccupied. 2) At various times the head tracker would reset itself at would take me out of the effect completely. I think the comfort of the headphone itself has a much bigger role to play in the listener forgetting that he/she is listening to a virtual speaker setup. 


Edited by GardenVariety - 12/30/13 at 9:17pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: High-end Audio Forum
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Summit-Fi (High-End Audio) › High-end Audio Forum › Long awaited Smyth SVS Realiser NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE