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HELP I have "New Music Sucks Snobbery Syndrome" aka NMSSS - Page 2

post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherwood View Post
It is my staunch opinion that music today is better than it ever has been at any point in history. The ready access to recording technology, the incredibly low barrier to entry and the increasingly powerful global middle-class has made all this possible, and it didn't exist under previous generations' hierarchical music stuctures.
Hmm, good point. Point in case: indie releases like Hungry Lucy, recorded at home by two people and marketed using Myspace and YouTube. Their recording quality is pretty damn good too.
post #17 of 37
Good post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottsmrnyc View Post
I also agree that a lot of new stuff out there is just terrible. I think for me this attitude comes from being 56 years of age and having had my musical experiences for a long time now. Of course growing up in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s is more than enough of a musical reason to say that the music of today is not the greatest. Regardless of what genre of music you are listening to from these time periods; there is only one conclusion that can be made and that is that this period was a golden age of music. The radio stations were willing to play total albums without interruption, bands played for 5 hours before they took a break, there were no restrictions. Once the corporations took control, it all died. At least this Rennaissance flourished for a while though! The other issue is that more experienced listeners have digested a lot of what is out there and are now hunger more musical food to intellectualize over. So they have to search through more obscure genres to feed themselves. At least one good thing is the alternative souces of music such as Internet Radio. Now there is a place where there is a lot to injest. Eventually, people will get tired of all the talk and commericalization of the airwaves and turn to the internet for some real music without the sales pitch. I almost feel that the public is being held hostage by sales and advertising; most of which we really don't need to have. It is often difficult to resist this myself. Scottsmrnyc
It's hard to find, but I just discovered with the help of a fellow headfier - Fleet Fox - a pretty new indie band that actually takes everything seriously. Very talented and great work ethic and creative.

Prior to that, I tried all kinds of alternative at lastfm and they all sounded the same... shallow and frankly boring. I kept thinking that they were nothing more than kids with lack of life experience mimicking other bands made up of the same. I'm sure some gems will come out of that, but I haven't found any yet.

Fleet Fox gave me inspiration to keep looking. Oh, BTW, they turned down a recording contract from Virgin because they don't want to go commercial or lose control of their song writing... HUGE credibility move there, because that was a lot of money they denied on principle
post #18 of 37
I find that music keeps getting better over time... in certain genres. I listen to a lot of metal, and despite recording and mastering not being ideal for some records, the composition and arrangement in a lot of today's music is amazing, and progressing well beyond what has been realized in the past. Bluegrass-derived acoustic music is also going in many different and exciting directions which have never been travelled before.

Quote:
Of course growing up in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s is more than enough of a musical reason to say that the music of today is not the greatest. Regardless of what genre of music you are listening to from these time periods; there is only one conclusion that can be made and that is that this period was a golden age of music.
And whom do we still cherish from this golden age? The groups and artists who were pushing back the cutting edge, that's who. Hendrix, Joplin, Dylan, Zep, Clapton, etc. etc. etc. Well, guess what? The people who play rock music today are wearing their influences on their sleeves, and are still trying to re-create the cutting edge from 30+ years ago. Well, it's not cutting edge anymore, and it's not surprising that it sometimes sounds tired and overdone.

IMO if you want to hear something truly fresh, don't look to rock music and 5-chord singer-songwriters the way you did in the "golden age". I like a lot of rock music, but I generally don't find the current offerings exciting and inspiring. I listen to DSOTM, and I recognize that it is a mind-blowing piece of work in the context of its time of creation. It was revolutionary, and it still sounds revolutionary. Current rock music is generally not.

Metal and bluegrass are where I look if I'm in search of the unexpected. YMMV of course.

EDIT: I see Sherwood posted essentially the same thing, more eloquently and using fewer words, while I was typing.
post #19 of 37
I've sort of had this attitude since the 80s. I wasn't into New Wave or the indie rock bands of the 80s and 90s. I bought a few albums of stuff I heard from friends. Some has not aged well, some has.

I agree with robm321 that there's a lot of crap out there, mostly for the low barrier to record stuff as Sherwood posted. But there's also a lot of tools for finding new music that isn't crap, such as allmusic.com, last.fm, Pandora, forums, etc.

I also feel that in the "golden age", there was a lot of crap produced as well. It's just long since forgotten.
post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidbasement View Post
I see Sherwood posted essentially the same thing, more eloquently and using fewer words, while I was typing.
It must simply have been my turn, Acid. You've got my back for next time.
post #21 of 37
I buy new music all the time, and a lot of it is great. I highly recommend the latest from Eko Case, Gomez, and Bat For Lashes.
post #22 of 37
I'm into electronic music, and I think that (ignoring localized peaks and valleys) it's more or less gotten better as time went on. That said, electronic music would be the 'genre' most affected (and most quickly affected) by advances in technology.
post #23 of 37
Nothing to add on the topic of not liking new music, but if you want to keep money away from major recording studios, check out this website:
RIAA Radar: Home

Just search for an album/artist and it will tell you if it's label is a member of the RIAA.In some cases there are albums that are both released on riaa and non-riaa labels, so you know which one to buy
post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ham Sandwich View Post
Rather than: New Music Sucks Snobbery Syndrome
It should be: New Mastering Sucks Snobbery Syndrome

Mastering and overproduction are killing new music. Too much reliance on the computer doing fancy processing during mixing and recording. Too much processing during mastering. No focus on letting the music be music.
No disrespect, man, but ultimately, we're after the essence of the music. Sure, bad mastering makes it harder to connect/enjoy, but good music is still good music, and bad music is still bad music.

Also, what Sherwood and acidbasement said.
post #25 of 37
My problem is that I don't have a real good idea of where to find newer stuff. Occasionally I'll check out some new stuff -- I remember a few years ago someone told me to get an Iron and Wine CD. So I did. And I didn't like it at all.

I guess my point is that if I'm at the shop and I see a Stones CD I want but don't have yet, I see no real reason to go with something newer when I know that I'm going to love the Stones CD.

Nothing against new music in general, its just that most of the stuff that gets recommended to me by my friends just sounds really similar and generally uninspired.
post #26 of 37
Recently it seems I've been finding a lot of new stuff that keeps my boat afloat. I don't have enough money to keep up with all of the new stuff I've heard and liked.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scott_d_m View Post
My favorite album is "Rubber Soul" but "Help" could easily be the soundtrack of my life.
'Help!' is my favorite Beatles album. Call me crazy.
post #27 of 37
I would never, ever let production stop me from listening to good music. I listen to a lot of hardcore, punk and screamo, and a lot of them simply didn't have the money to record super high-quality albums, but the music is still great. Now, if there's obvious clipping, I'll skip it, but barring that I'm not going to bitch and moan about every minute detail.

As for new music: it's not up to other people to tell you what new music you will like. If you're in to classic rock, there isn't really anything that can directly compare to guitar gods like Page or Clapton. As Sherwood said, you really need to actively seek new music for yourself, find what you like, and progress from there.
post #28 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMahler View Post
Anyone have a similar feeling about how anything new has to be less than a classic.

-Dave
Not really, no. My preferences lie mostly in metal and electronica - two broad blanket genres that I've found to only get better as time goes on. YMMV depending on your specific preferences.

Regarding the mastering bit, the only thing I have to say about that is that I'm a music lover first and an audiophile second - very few exceptions.
post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by PWilson View Post
No disrespect, man, but ultimately, we're after the essence of the music. Sure, bad mastering makes it harder to connect/enjoy, but good music is still good music, and bad music is still bad music.

Also, what Sherwood and acidbasement said.
I'm in agreement with Sherwood and acidbasement. There is plenty of good creative new music.

I was making a distinction that rather than being snobby about new music it might be more accurate to be snobby about new mastering and production techniques. Same acronym just a different focus (mastering rather than music).

Overly loud and compressed mastering can affect the emotional content of the music for some types of music, and in those cases the music suffers.

Overproduction with clicktracks to make the mixing computer editing friendly also causes the music to suffer. Music with no variation in the rhythm and beat loses emotion and life. In those cases the music suffers. (there are other ways to overproduce and album or song as well)

I need emotion in my music. Otherwise it quickly gets tiresome and old and I lose interest. I'm willing (and I do) to listen to poor recording and masterings of music that still has the emotion. I don't base my listening on what is strictly audiophile in quality. If the music still has what is needed to pull me in I'll listen.
post #30 of 37
I felt this way for a while, and then I found a few new bands which let me to a few more, and then a few more. 90% of mainstream music today is utter crap, but there is more than enough indie rock to make up for that. Every one of the 20+ cds I have picked up in the last year have been played from start to finish at least 10 times. It takes a little more work but it is really satisfying when you find that awesome new band.

BTW I know a few bands that have gone the complete opposite way and record on all analog equipment and master with all analog equipment. Screaming Females out of New Brunswick has this message on the inside of all their albums. They are still a bit of a "Lo-Fi" band but the music still sounds great.
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