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Changing LED brightness.

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hey. Thinking of changing LED brightness on the Littledot MKIII by chucking a resistor infront of it. Will this affect the amp in any other way? I am fairly inexperienced so I am not sure how itll affect things. Otherwise, are there different brightness LEDs available?
post #2 of 14
I can't imagine that the led would be connected to any of the actual amp circuitry, so you would probably be fine just increasing the resistance in front of the LED. I would email david to make sure, also. You can also ask him what the specs of the LED in the amp are, so you can get a new one brighter or dimmer. While you're at it, ask him what the voltage drop is supposed to be so you can pick the right resistor if you change LEDS.

You can buy different LEDs. Try superbrightleds.com If you change the LED, though, you will need to change the resistor.
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tintin47 View Post
While you're at it, ask him what the voltage drop is supposed to be so you can pick the right resistor if you change LEDS.
The resistor might be directly on the board, so depending on location, it could be a bear to get out. Find out first! Also, just changing the resistor should do it, but will probably void your warrantee.

Also - soldering LEDs - if you opt to do this, these things can get overheated really easy. I've cooked my share!
post #4 of 14
There is a problem with just lowering the resistor in front of the LED. It is there to act as a current limiting device. The LED and resistor are chosen in tandem. There is a maximum current rating on the LED, which the resistor provides it. By lowering the resistance, you increase the current to the LED, which could cause it to burn out or at the very least cause it to have a shorter life span.

Your best bet would be to find the voltage, and then choose a new, brighter LED, and matching resistor.
post #5 of 14
You can change the resistor but do not remove it. If you remove it then you will most likely blow the LED. As the above poster mentioned the resistor acts as a current limit, remove that and you will have a near short in the circuit.

Now then you do not need to replace the LED, chances are you can make it brighter by replacing the resistor with a lower value resistor. However not knowing the type of LED and the voltage of the circuit picking a good resistor value will be difficult. Generally though the color of the LED will tell you the approximate max current and forward voltage drop of the device so all you would need to know is the voltage of the circuit to pick a proper resistor.
post #6 of 14
I think he's trying to make it dimmer by adding a resistor
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred_fred2004 View Post
I think he's trying to make it dimmer by adding a resistor
I agree, and adding resistance would in no way damage anything.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILAMtitan View Post
There is a problem with just lowering the resistor in front of the LED. It is there to act as a current limiting device.
On that amp...Do you know for sure? The LED can be hung across the power lines just as an indicator light. On the Dynahi, yes, it would be there as current limiting. I do not know about this amp.

Once again, the earlier suggestions were to talk to the mfr.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDBacklash View Post
Hey. Thinking of changing LED brightness on the Littledot MKIII by chucking a resistor infront of it. Will this affect the amp in any other way? I am fairly inexperienced so I am not sure how itll affect things. Otherwise, are there different brightness LEDs available?
no problemo.

Unless the LED is meant as a voltage reference for other circuits, which most of us here are not sure of.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILAMtitan View Post
There is a problem with just lowering the resistor in front of the LED. It is there to act as a current limiting device. The LED and resistor are chosen in tandem. There is a maximum current rating on the LED, which the resistor provides it. By lowering the resistance, you increase the current to the LED, which could cause it to burn out or at the very least cause it to have a shorter life span.
The OP said "by chucking a resistor infront of it". He did not say that he wanted to lower the RLED resistor. I interpreted his post to mean he wants to add a resistor to reduce the brightness of the existing LED.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ILAMtitan View Post
Your best bet would be to find the voltage, and then choose a new, brighter LED, and matching resistor.
This might make sense if the OP wants to increase the brightness of the LED.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bhjazz View Post
On that amp...Do you know for sure? The LED can be hung across the power lines just as an indicator light. On the Dynahi, yes, it would be there as current limiting. I do not know about this amp.

Once again, the earlier suggestions were to talk to the mfr.
I think the previous poster meant that the resistor is there to limit current to the LED, and if you remove the RLED the LED will blow, etc...
post #11 of 14
Missed the making it dimmer part. He could mean "chucking it in parallel" though.

If the LED is used a voltage reference (which it probably isn't, I would expect a zener for that), then adding a resistor won't change anything. The voltages will still be the same. If it's a current reference then things will be different.

Alternatively, you could just leave the resistor and LED there, just inside the case, then add a second LED circuit across the voltage and ground line. This would leave the stock circuit intact, and just require a bit more current from the supply. That's a real hack job kind of fix though.
post #12 of 14
OP could get really fancy and just mount a trimpot somewhere. He can adjust the brightness to exactly what he wants without playing with different resistor values.
post #13 of 14
More resistance = lower current = dimmer LED

Go for it. You can't hurt it by increasing the resistance by adding another resistor inline. Just be aware that if the current is too low it might not light at all. So go ahead and give it a shot.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ended up swapping the colour to match the colour of the tubes with similar resistance from the globe
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