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How to check if a flac file is real? - Page 3

post #31 of 39
Audiochecker - Home

Audiochecker seems to work well.
post #32 of 39
Thanks for the tips. I myself am worried about this as well. When artists release free albums with FLAC, ALAC, WAV and MP3 and it could be possible that they transcode the other files. Due to poor recording errors or truly a transcode.
post #33 of 39
Another method is to convert the track from Left Right Stereo to Mid Side Stereo, then isolating the Side Channel alone. A quick way is to grab those simple vocal remover plugins, which essentially does the same thing.

The side channel will tend reveal compression artifacts much more than the left right channels as i think the mp3 encoding process uses much less data when encoding the sides in Joint Stereo mode.
post #34 of 39
Simplest way to do this is with spectro. You see a freq response spectrum and can check the cutoff hz. CD goes to 22000 hz I believe; less is an mp3 or any other lossy. You can also use a program like adobe audition but that takes longer to start, more of a hassle, etc.

Spectro - Freeware Audio File Analyzer
post #35 of 39

Perhaps not quite a legit answer, but anyway I was wondering.

 

If you can't hear the difference between a FLAC and a MP3, why would you bother to use FLAC?

 

Kind regards.

post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theluciano909 View Post
 

Perhaps not quite a legit answer, but anyway I was wondering.

 

If you can't hear the difference between a FLAC and a MP3, why would you bother to use FLAC?

 

Kind regards.

 

My main reason for using FLAC is for archival purposes. Even though MP3 is basically universally supported, if I needed a different format for some reason, I would want to start with a lossless copy rather than (for instance) making a lossy copy based off an already lossy copy. 

 

I have enough storage and it is cheap enough that I'm not really worried about file size. I generally convert to MP3 v0 for my portable devices though and leave the large files at home. 

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theluciano909 View Post
 

Perhaps not quite a legit answer, but anyway I was wondering.

 

If you can't hear the difference between a FLAC and a MP3, why would you bother to use FLAC?

 

Kind regards.

 

d69d20af_Necromancy.PNG

 

First post and your already a Master Necromancer.     ;)

post #38 of 39

Quote:

Originally Posted by earthpeople View Post
 

 

My main reason for using FLAC is for archival purposes. Even though MP3 is basically universally supported, if I needed a different format for some reason, I would want to start with a lossless copy rather than (for instance) making a lossy copy based off an already lossy copy. 

 

I have enough storage and it is cheap enough that I'm not really worried about file size. I generally convert to MP3 v0 for my portable devices though and leave the large files at home. 

 

Ah I see. So if I were to become an Apple fanboy and want to convert all my audio files to AAC, then the original FLAC would give me a better audio file (compared to MP3)?

 

And what if I convert a FLAC to m4a and then back to FLAC. Both are lossless, but will the two FLACs be identical?


Edited by Theluciano909 - 5/20/15 at 11:17pm
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theluciano909 View Post
 

Quote:

 

Ah I see. So if I were to become an Apple fanboy and want to convert all my audio files to AAC, then the original FLAC would give me a better audio file (compared to MP3)?

 

And what if I convert a FLAC to m4a and then back to FLAC. Both are lossless, but will the two FLACs be identical?

 

m4a is a container format, and can contain either AAC or ALAC. Converting a FLAC to ALAC and back should keep the audio content identical, as they are both lossless formats.

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