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Grado SR325i vs. SR225i

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
I did some searching on the forum, but didn't come up with a very clear comparison between these two Grado models. The 325i's are a bit pricey for me, so I'm figuring if they are very close in sound signature I might just get the 225's. The 325's were recommended to me by a guy who has mixed several successful bluegrass albums with them and claims they are the most accurate headphones for mixing. He claims he's used many headphones over the years for mixing and none can compare to the SR325. But if it's just a matter of better bass extension compared to the 225, I will go with the cheaper model. Can anyone clarify the differences between the two models? Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 37
Grados aren't very neutral to begin with so I would respectively question how well Grados are use for mixing. I’m don’t mix stuff so I guess that’s a huge fallacy and maybe I’m wrong.

On subject of which is better, I’ve compared the sr325i and the sr225 and I chose sr225 for better comfort and less harsh signature. However, I really don't think you will get a conclusive answer on headfi, the only way is try them both.
post #3 of 37
Thread Starter 
The lower priced Grado's not very neutral FWIR, but I read that the higher end ones are more so. Lot's of people told me they use the Sony mdr-v6/7506 for mixing and I can't fathom how they could possibly do that since they sound way to hyped to me. I'm using the k240DF's right now and they seem very neutral. I thought I'd try another set of cans with a bit more forward sound signature...not so polite... since a lot of people in the music industry seem to favor monitor speakers that are not very laid back like the yamaha's, and I'm trying to get a couple of songs ready to submit to Pump Audio...and maybe Taxi. Anyway, this guy I met on another forum is adamant about the Grado 325's being the best for mixing...and if what he tells me is true, he's got the credentials to back up that statement. Of course YMMV always applies.
post #4 of 37
The SR-225(i) has less treble then the SR-325i, but the SR-225(i) treble sounds more natural and extended. Most people say that the SR-325i(s) highs are piercing/fatiguing, but I hardly think they are. Also the SR-325i(s) have more bass and a somewhat sheen to their sound. They are also cumbersome and easily slip off your head, so no head banging please! Another thing to note is that the SR-325i(s) overall sound is a little different than the normal Grado sound.

If you get the SR-325i(s) and feel they are fatiguing, just listen at lower volumes a little bit everyday till your ears become accustomed to their sound. Then the fatiguing thing should be solved and if not, I'd just return them if possible.

EDIT: Also if you need more bass, just put some electrical tape around the 'bowls" and the bass is nearly doubled. This happens because the bowls are open on the sides and when putting tape around them it prevents sound from flowing out. Essentially it focuses the sound into the ear canal and slightly raises the SPL. This is good if you are a bass-head like me .

Let me know if you have anymore questions. I'm here and I'm willing to help.
post #5 of 37
Thread Starter 
Thanks zombie. What does the tape do to the rest of the frequencies...any effect? How do the two models compare with regards to detail? Are the 325i's a lot better or just marginally so?
post #6 of 37
I'd say taping makes them sound smaller but frequencies sound about the same. The SR-325i is only like a 15% upgrade and it does have a little bit more detail.
post #7 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombie_X View Post
I'd say taping makes them sound smaller but frequencies sound about the same. The SR-325i is only like a 15% upgrade and it does have a little bit more detail.
Thanks Zombie...that's the kind of reply I was looking for!
post #8 of 37
For a frequency comparison visit
Headroom

I have owned both headphones and kept the 325i. It better suited the kinds of music I wanted it to compliment. Evident from the headroom graph, both headphones have a somewhat weak bass frequency response, but if that doesn't ruin your mixing then I suggest you just try both on and make up your mind. It's not an exact science and your ears are worth more than spectrometers or oscilloscopes.

Another choice for very neutral headphones could be AKG K701 with a transparent amp.
post #9 of 37
Whoa! John Grado headphones are far from neutral! Their sound rocks, but I cant imagine someone doing any mixing with them.
post #10 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaZa View Post
Whoa! John Grado headphones are far from neutral! Their sound rocks, but I cant imagine someone doing any mixing with them.
O.K. but, can you give me a frame of reference for that comment. In other words...compared to what...AKG 701...HD600...monitor speakers...what?
post #11 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by lejaz View Post
O.K. but, can you give me a frame of reference for that comment. In other words...compared to what...AKG 701...HD600...monitor speakers...what?
nearly any other brand.
grados have a reputation for being very bright.
(not good or bad, all preference.)
post #12 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by lejaz View Post
O.K. but, can you give me a frame of reference for that comment. In other words...compared to what...AKG 701...HD600...monitor speakers...what?


Old Joseph Grado headphones were very neutral according to impressions and comparisons, and highly sought after HP1000 model is quite famous here. Now his nephew (or atleast I think it was nephew) John leads the business, and he has different ideology for good sound. He builds sort of hifi headphones, not monitoring headphones, with tuned sound to make music more pleasing (much like hifi speakers vs. studio monitor speakers, you get the idea). John Grado headphones are known for their rather warm midrange, peaky upper midrange and highs and boosted, punchy midbass. This is their "housesound", much like higher end Sennheisers have their own housesound, smooth and laidback. (pretty much opposite of Grados in-your-face and sharp and bright sound. Senn vs. Grado wars between fans are quite common ) Grados are, IMHO, especially good sounding with music relying on distorted guitars like rock and metal as their sound really make electronic guitars sing.

Im not sure, but I think Grado headphones sound is often said to be somewhat similar to Klipsch hifi speakers? Cant confirm this myself as I have never heard Klipsch products.
post #13 of 37
Thread Starter 
So you're saying that Mr. Grado thinks his taste in what will be most pleasing is superior to the taste of the engineers who mixed and mastered the original material? I always find it strange that someone would want to make a speaker or headphone that alters the sound that the original artists/producers/engineers created. If I listen to the Beatles "Rubber Soul" or some other well produced album I want to hear it with neutral/accurate headphones/speakers. If it's not exactly to my liking I can always use eq. And for mixing purposes I obviously would want accurate/neutral headphones. I'm starting to re-think my plan to get the Grados.
post #14 of 37
Dunno man, but boy do Grado's sound awesome!! Like everyone else is saying, Grado headphones are very colored (not in a bad way though) and probably won't be good for mixing. HD600 would be better for that since it's more neutral.
post #15 of 37
Yeah, the HD 600 would be a better match if you plan on doing any mixing/mastering.
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