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Metallica self titled (black album) vinyl re-release problem

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I recently bought the metallica self titled (black album) vinyl re-release, and everything was sounding fantastic and then I got up to vinyl three, all is still going well untill the vocals start in nothing else matters and it starts distorting. I've since tried it on a couple other turntables and it still distorts.

Just wondering if this is a fault in the recording, or if i've just got a faulty vinyl (though it looks perfect, there's no scratches or dirt), so i'm just wanting someon to qualify that this should or shouldn't be happening.
post #2 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thought I might add the vinyl is the 2008 re-release nad was made in Europe. I know my 2008 rerelease of ride the lighning was made in the US and has no problems. Anyone have any experience with this?
post #3 of 19
Is this the 45RPM or the regular LP?

It is very possible that you got a bad pressing. I'd call the retailer whom you bought it from and say it's defective. They may take it back (MD would). Have you cleaned it to make sure it's not just junk in the grooves? (Mold release)

NK
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
I've taken it back and they refunded me the money, there was nothing that was visibly wrong with the record (the store cleaned it and whilst the owner couldn't hear the problem though I still could [he would be in his mid fourties though, and i'm in my early twenties so hearing is obvioulsy a huge factor]). It was the regular LP (I can't justify the cost of the 45rpm, especially when the increase in sound quality is debatable).

May main concern though is finding a copy that doesn't have this problem.
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntory_Times View Post
I've taken it back and they refunded me the money, there was nothing that was visibly wrong with the record (the store cleaned it and whilst the owner couldn't hear the problem though I still could [he would be in his mid fourties though, and i'm in my early twenties so hearing is obvioulsy a huge factor]). It was the regular LP (I can't justify the cost of the 45rpm, especially when the increase in sound quality is debatable).

May main concern though is finding a copy that doesn't have this problem.
I'd order a copy from MD. If you don't like it they'll take it back, no problem. Bad pressings are usually an isolated event. Every product-producing machine slips up at some point.


So you're sure it wasn't just the mold release?

NK
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm not entirely sure what you mean by mold release (i'm a relative newb when it comes to vinyl), but the record was clean and the owner of the record store I bought it from looked at it and said it was a flawless print, he also couldn't hear the fault. The fault was mainly in the higher frequencies of James voice (especially noticable on nothing else matters). I was wodndering if anyone knows of a way to ensure that what you buy online is from America (or not the european copy)?
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntory_Times View Post
I'm not entirely sure what you mean by mold release (i'm a relative newb when it comes to vinyl), but the record was clean and the owner of the record store I bought it from looked at it and said it was a flawless print, he also couldn't hear the fault. The fault was mainly in the higher frequencies of James voice (especially noticable on nothing else matters). I was wodndering if anyone knows of a way to ensure that what you buy online is from America (or not the european copy)?
Sometimes the Euro copies are better, it all depends...

I'm guessing you had a bad pressing. It's not a big deal, if your second copy has the same problem, start looking for answers.

Mold release is a spray they use to help the records come out of the press at the factory. It sometimes needs to be cleaned off new records for them to track right.

NK


P.S - how "high frequency?" It could be sibilance, which is a product of mastering..
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntory_Times View Post
I'm not entirely sure what you mean by mold release (i'm a relative newb when it comes to vinyl), but the record was clean and the owner of the record store I bought it from looked at it and said it was a flawless print, he also couldn't hear the fault. The fault was mainly in the higher frequencies of James voice (especially noticable on nothing else matters). I was wodndering if anyone knows of a way to ensure that what you buy online is from America (or not the european copy)?
A little more on Mold Release: "All new records have a coating on the vinyl called 'mold release compound.' This compound is used in the record pressing plant to separate the metal stampers from the vinyl. Record cleaning fluids will not remove the sticky compound. When the compound dries it will leave a film that produces noise in the playback of the record. Also, small airborne particles in the record factory will stick to the grooves producing a 'pop' even on brand new records" (Discogs)

NK
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Interesting about the mold release, i'll keep that in mind in the future. It may be sibilance, but it wasn't always present, it cut in and out (even in the same song), on top of that the 'distortion' to me was so obvious I don't know how any person mastering would not notice this problem (and from my understanding it was masterred by a fairly reliable company).
post #10 of 19
Static?
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robm321 View Post
Static?
It wasn't static, it was actual distortion in the voice, it's quite hard to explain as I haven't heard anything like it before (I cleaned it, and used a carbon fiber brush on it), so it is highly unlikely that static was the issue. I'm almost certain it was a fault in the vinyl (it wasn't destroying the music), but did take away from my ability to enjoy it (I would be able to accept it with an old used vinyl, but not a new shiny one).
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntory_Times View Post
It wasn't static, it was actual distortion in the voice, it's quite hard to explain as I haven't heard anything like it before (I cleaned it, and used a carbon fiber brush on it), so it is highly unlikely that static was the issue. I'm almost certain it was a fault in the vinyl (it wasn't destroying the music), but did take away from my ability to enjoy it (I would be able to accept it with an old used vinyl, but not a new shiny one).
Pressing Pressing Pressing

You didn't happen to record the stamper number did you?

NK
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick 214 View Post
Pressing Pressing Pressing

You didn't happen to record the stamper number did you?

NK
No, but I can probably get it (I doubt it has been sold on yet). What would this tell me/us?
post #14 of 19
Higher-up stamper numbers usually don't sound as good..

GL on the next one.

NK
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick 214 View Post
Higher-up stamper numbers usually don't sound as good..

GL on the next one.

NK
May I ask why, Is it just the pressing machine slowly moving out of 'sync' so to speak?
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