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Bitrate numbers

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi guys, I've just looked through some of my music and I realised that I've a couple of mp3 songs that are encoded in bitrates like 197, 217, etc.

Is this possible or has it been through a series of weird format changes?
post #2 of 11
AFAIK, MP3 can be anything between 32kb/s and 320kb/s. At least that's What MPEG1 (layer 3) specifies. I'm all AIFF, so nothing below about 1,400kb/s (1.4Mb/s)

NK
post #3 of 11
Its definitely possible if the songs is encoded on Variable Bit Rate basis.......
post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by imademymark View Post
Hi guys, I've just looked through some of my music and I realised that I've a couple of mp3 songs that are encoded in bitrates like 197, 217, etc.

Is this possible or has it been through a series of weird format changes?
Those numbers are the average bitrates within a VBR-encoded MP3 file (VBR = variable bit rates); the actual bitrates may range from 64 to 320 kb/s. VBR is the best compromize between file size and sound quality.
.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
ahh many thanks guys. been a great help as usual. i was just under the impression that when i rip at vbr 320, then the bit rate will be reflected as 320, but i guess not.
post #6 of 11
post #7 of 11
Theyre VBR2 Mp3s more than likely. Probably 256 VBR or 192 VBR depending on how busy the music is (probably 256). 192 VBR is beleived to be inaudibly lossy @ hydrogenaudio forums.
edit: While we're at it. I have some of 128 kbps mp3s, and can hear the buzz that they always seem to have on some of my headphones, but not my 770/80 pros. Is there a way I can use a DSP to emulate this without severely impacting the sound of the track? (maybe an interpolation of the static?)
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
yes i did read that bit, i was asking something quite specific, not found in wiki. but thanks for pointing it out anyway

i know theres a standard drill about googling/ searching before starting a thread to ask questions, but by the same token i think before replying to search/ showing obvious links insinuating the same, that the question is read.

this sounds abit more aggressive than i intend to so appologies in advance because no malice is intended
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by imademymark View Post
yes i did read that bit, i was asking something quite specific, not found in wiki. but thanks for pointing it out anyway

i know theres a standard drill about googling/ searching before starting a thread to ask questions, but by the same token i think before replying to search/ showing obvious links insinuating the same, that the question is read.

this sounds abit more aggressive than i intend to so appologies in advance because no malice is intended
If you've been downloading or switching between formats, it is very possible to get some obscure numbers like you have there.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
that's the thing, most of my songs are ripped from cds, but i've a couple that were sent to me with bitrate numbers likethat. i always thought if you rip at vbr and set it at 256 for example, then the song should- be listed as having a bitrate of 256
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by imademymark View Post
that's the thing, most of my songs are ripped from cds, but i've a couple that were sent to me with bitrate numbers likethat. i always thought if you rip at vbr and set it at 256 for example, then the song should- be listed as having a bitrate of 256
For whatever reason, it does happen. I recently ripped a Donnie Iris CD, "Ellwood City" to my external FW 400 HD using iTunes set on .AIFF, 16-Bit, 44.4khz.. And I got the usual 1411kb/s bitrartes, then two tracks at 1536kb/s.

I don't know why, but it happened.

NK

P.S. Donnie Is The Man - The Official Home of Donnie Iris and The Cruisers
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