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Lets Talk Metal - Page 655

post #9811 of 16554

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post #9815 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveBSC View Post

 

The HE-500 is generally considered one of the more balanced and accurate HFM orthos.. but keep that in context, it's balanced for a HFM ortho. If you don't mind a closed back headphone, the Paradox is as flat as any headphone I've heard, costs less than the HE-500, and is excellent with metal. It's forgiving enough to not make most typically lousy metal recordings unlistenable, and the better then recording you feed it, the more it responds. Headstage is really it's only flaw, but with metal that's not really a big deal, and I doubt it's any worse than the LCDs which are hardly known for their headstages despite being open.

Interested in this thread....but I'm going to flip it....I'm considering adding the HE 500 as a second set of cans for a variety of listening, but specifically targted to non metal.

 

I auditioned some HE-500's last weekend. I liked them. But, I'm not sure they would be my top choice for metal. However, I'm open to the idea that with time, I could be wrong about that.

 

Some refer their sound akin to B&W British speakers-"polite" sounding, while the 400's while not as highly regarded are more fun and immediate. The 400's have a base presentation that's popular for EDM and hip hop-two of my least favorite genres, but many like the 400's for rock &  metal as well.

 

I have some Grados that feel more immediate and aggressive.

 

I listen to a fair amount of non metal at home w/ HP's, often preferring metal on my Ipod or in my car, or on speakers in the house....but when on the computer, for instance, often gravitate to something more mellow. I find when I want to be productive on a computer, extreme metal isn't always the best match for me.

 

But, while driving, working out, screwing around in the house....being more active-love it! And, one edit, one of my favorite things to do, when I have the time at the end of the day, is pop a beer, put on a good metal CD,  and listen attentively via my dedicated HP or speaker rig to a good metal/rock recording in a more "dedicated listeining" way. I'm really enjoying hearing things I haven't heard on disc w/ both my HP and speaker system that I've been assembling since joining Headfi this year.

 

When listening to the two-my Grado 225i and the HE-500-the HE's clearly were more high end...more refined and more comfortable. The difference between my unschooled ears would be:

 

  • My Grados-aggressive, bright-feel like you're on stage with the band. Also, I know Grados illicit strong responses-love or hate.
  • HE-500-larger sound stage, better over all audiophile sound-but more laid back and removed-as if you are in the audience of a large concert hall vs being in the first row or even onstage with the band. Less fatiguing.

 

Funny, while the HE's were clearly better audiophile sound, my Grados have a clarity in my face quality that I sometimes prefer for metal. It's left me wondering if "audiophile" quality sound-whatever that means to you-is necessarily better for listening to metal which we all know isn't always recorded that well....I'm still trying to wrap my head around these concepts.....

 

I'd welcome other thoughts on the HE's as well having only limited time with them.


Edited by markm1 - 6/1/13 at 7:08am
post #9816 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by keepitsimple View Post

Niceeeee!!!!!!

post #9817 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor View Post


At this point, comment when you see something interesting. I don't want to tell you what to do either or even visit a particular site (especially if you don't find any enjoyment in it - clearly).

Post here as well. We have a sort of tight nit group here that loves to talk METAL.

 

Metal- Fi is a great site. Everyone should check it out and use the comment section to discus interesting topics just like on this site.

Well, all places where metal heads can get together and share their passion are nice :) 

post #9818 of 16554

ok, I have a stupid question but I´ll go ahead anyway xD

I´ve noticed that some albums are more fatiquing for the ears/ more agressive than others and I couldn´t really tell why. Sometimes there is some bit of "ringing" in my ears and sometimes not. I don´t think that it necessarily has something to do with compression/ dynamic range. Do you guys know more about that and if there are any programs that can "manipulate" songs to make them softer to listen to or erase some frequencies that are uncomfortable to hear?

post #9819 of 16554

Hey Guys, I've been trying to get into black metal for a while, can you make some suggestions to get me started? Let's limit it to two albums per person so I'm not overwhelmed. I come from a stoner/prog metal background if that helps at all. Currently, I am trying to get into Deafheaven but haven't put too much time into it yet. Thanks ahead of time. 

post #9820 of 16554

Darkthrone - transylvanian hunger

emperor - in the nightside eclipse

 

if you want to try bands that have black metal roots/ influences but are easier to get into I would also recommend Enslaved (ethica odini) or wolves in the throne room (any album).

post #9821 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazingsonic View Post

ok, I have a stupid question but I´ll go ahead anyway xD

I´ve noticed that some albums are more fatiquing for the ears/ more agressive than others and I couldn´t really tell why. Sometimes there is some bit of "ringing" in my ears and sometimes not. I don´t think that it necessarily has something to do with compression/ dynamic range. Do you guys know more about that and if there are any programs that can "manipulate" songs to make them softer to listen to or erase some frequencies that are uncomfortable to hear?

Try Dialing down the treble in your equalizer. Try dropping anything for 2khz onward. Obviously this will change the sound of the music, but should allow for a longer listening experience. You could also try turning down the volume as well lol. People tend to be more sensitive to higher frequencies anyway:

 

  

So this peaks around 4kHz

 

Hyperphysics has a great explanation of the general workings of the ear if you're curious:

 

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/sound/earsens.html

post #9822 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by krtzer View Post

Try Dialing down the treble in your equalizer. Try dropping anything for 2khz onward. Obviously this will change the sound of the music, but should allow for a longer listening experience. You could also try turning down the volume as well lol. People tend to be more sensitive to higher frequencies anyway:

  


So this peaks around 4kHz

Hyperphysics has a great explanation of the general workings of the ear if you're curious:

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/sound/earsens.html

I can't tell but is that FM curve? The reason why good mastering engineers mix at 85db!
post #9823 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by markm1 View Post

 

  • My Grados-aggressive, bright-feel like you're on stage with the band. Also, I know Grados illicit strong responses-love or hate.
  • HE-500-larger sound stage, better over all audiophile sound-but more laid back and removed-as if you are in the audience of a large concert hall vs being in the first row or even onstage with the band. Less fatiguing.

 

Funny, while the HE's were clearly better audiophile sound, my Grados have a clarity in my face quality that I sometimes prefer for metal. It's left me wondering if "audiophile" quality sound-whatever that means to you-is necessarily better for listening to metal which we all know isn't always recorded that well....I'm still trying to wrap my head around these concepts.....

 

A lot of it comes down to personal preference, and a lot of it depends on what the definition of "audiophile" is. The AKG K701 could be considered an "audiophile" geared headphone, but it's "r" type frequency response is awful for metal listening, and IMO its an awful headphone, full stop. Personally I can't stand Grados, and I imagine that anyone with even the slightest amount of treble sensitivity will probably hate them as well. I won't even get in to the fact that a few of them at very low and very high frequencies are literally producing more harmonic distortion than signal.

 

What I like for a metal headphone is a "D" shaped response. Very strong (and clean!) bass and mid-bass, no midrange suckout, and a slightly rolled treble without grain or glare to tame the typically crappy metal master. There really aren't that many headphones with that kind of response. Most of the consumer geared cans have the usual "U" shape, and audiophile headphones usually roll off way too early in the bass and have too prominent of a treble region ala the K701. The Paradox is pretty much exactly a "--" shape, or as close to that as I've heard from a headphone. My Stax SR-007 was obviously way more transparent with much better resolution than the Paradox, but it couldn't match the bass energy, and was much more rolled in the highs.

post #9824 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazingsonic View Post

ok, I have a stupid question but I´ll go ahead anyway xD

I´ve noticed that some albums are more fatiquing for the ears/ more agressive than others and I couldn´t really tell why. Sometimes there is some bit of "ringing" in my ears and sometimes not. I don´t think that it necessarily has something to do with compression/ dynamic range. Do you guys know more about that and if there are any programs that can "manipulate" songs to make them softer to listen to or erase some frequencies that are uncomfortable to hear?

A lot of metal albums push the HF region way up in the mix. Combine that with poor recording techniques, compression, and likely copious amounts of digital clipping, and you're left with an album that will probably hurt your ears. If you're hearing phantom ringing in your ears after listening, TURN IT DOWN. Or one day the ringing won't stop, forever. Aside from that, any software EQ will let you pull the highs down some which should help.

post #9825 of 16554
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor View Post


I can't tell but is that FM curve? The reason why good mastering engineers mix at 85db!

Yes it is. Sorry for not citing the source but here's the wikipedia article for Fletcher-Munson Curves/Equal loudness curves for those who are interested: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal-loudness_contours

 

The curve is a measure of sound pressure for which the listener perceives the same loudness. I'm a big fan of the science and math behind all this stuff and I just so happen to like metal as well. :D

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