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Distinguishing Between Occlusion and Microphonics With IEMS

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
I have the Head-Direct RE2s and they make way too much noise for me to enjoy them. I need to make a conscious effort to stay perfectly still to avoid getting unwanted sound. How do I tell if it is occlusion or microphonics? I get noise when I tap my cable, but I also get noise when my cables aren't touching anything and I just twitch my head. If seal matters, I feel like I'm getting a good one. When I remove them, I can hear the suction, and when listening, it doesn't sound bass deficient. I'm using the large clear bi-flanges.

Do different IEMs have different levels of occlusion, or is it entirely (or mostly) dependent on tips and deep insertion.

Also... I'm hearing my heart beat when listening in bed. I set my Clip between 1-5 volume. Any way to prevent this?
post #2 of 3
It is microphonics not occlusion. Occlusion is the sound you get when you put a finger in your ear. Occlusion can only be fixed by using custom in-ears since they overlap the bone part in your ear (if done properly). It is only a big problem for singers and performers.

The RE2s are alright not the worst but not the best when it comes to canceling out microphonics. You might want to try a shirt clip or wearing them with cable over the ear.
post #3 of 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClieOS View Post
Microphonic and Bone Conduction

Two of the most common complaints from new IEM user are microphonic (or ‘cable noise’) and bone conduction. Microphonic is the phenomenon where the IEM user can hear noise (caused by IEM’s cable brushes against clothing or another object) transmitted by the cable into the IEM. Bone conduction is the phenomenon where the IEM user can hear noise (caused by body motion such as eating and walking) transmitted with in the body. Both of these phenomenon are the side effect of sealing the ear canal and forming an acoustic chamber that enhance such noise.

Microphonic can be ‘grounded’ by wearing the IEM in over-the-ear style or using a shirt-clip to stop the sound transmission. Some companies offer better cable that doesn't exhibit microphonic as much. Bone conduction can be limited by stop eating and walking softly (changing shoe). In the end, most user will get used to both and eventually forget about them.

If RE2 is your first IEM, than maybe you need sometime to get use to both microphonic and bone conduction (occlusion). Most first timer eventually get used to both and start to ignore them naturally. If you still can't get used to both of them after a while, than there is a good chance IEM is not for you.
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