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How bright is an ultrasone pro 900? - Page 3

post #31 of 206
Happy new year Peter, and all in good fun right! No the reason why I wouldn't use them is because they sound very much alive and actually almost fun sounding (I think the ED9 is also 'fun' sounding for that matter), while a K701 is boring as hell (just like KRK monitors for instance). I'm not a professional audio mixer by any means, I make the music, and send it away
post #32 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
Well, I'm sure the OP won't mind if we stray OT just a bit

I'm not really that excited about wooden phones in general and out of production ATs in particular - my standard operating procedure is to buy from an American retailer with a return policy so I can dump them easily if I dislike them. Additionally, I prefer plastic or possibly metal cups for durability reasons. I'm not unnecessarily rough with my headphones but the occasional bump can happen.

So, if my requirements were: plastic/metal cups, sturdy, closed, velour (or possibly real leather), and deep bass without boosted midbass, Ultrasones seemed worth looking at. They don't have to be neutral, of course, but I'd rather not feel like I have to boost the mids. I tend to listen around 65-70 dBC, slow tracking.

Based on some of the impressions, I thought the pro 900 might have fit the bill, if not I can't think of anything else that would.
You need to be aware that you're ruling out a lot of good options from the get-go, that's probably not gonna lead to the ideal sonic result. I'd also agree that under those circumstances, "some Ultrasone" might be your best bet. The HFI-680 seemed pretty good to me and didn't have all that much of a recess in the mids. I liked the ED9 when I heard it briefly, but it wasn't that much of a revelation to make me shell out the money for them. They COULD be for you and fit most of your criteria.
The only other option that comes to my mind right now is the A900Ti - which is also out of production - BUT, it's also somewhat comparable to the HD650. Detailed and slightly elevated bass (more focused on deep bass than midbass), medium-sized soundstage and unfatiguing overall. There's a bit of a mids recession but nothing too prominent. Overall it sounds pretty transparent and neutral, no obvious flaws. In terms of resolution and detail retrieval it's decent, too.
Check: deep bass, no midbass bloat, metal housing, sturdy
No check: pleather pads, limited edition - out of production
post #33 of 206
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by big-ban View Post
You need to be aware that you're ruling out a lot of good options from the get-go, that's probably not gonna lead to the ideal sonic result. I'd also agree that under those circumstances, "some Ultrasone" might be your best bet.
Yeah, I know that makes it tricky, but what fun is life without arbitrary rules?

Thus far a beyer DT250-250 is the best compromise I've found, its only real failing is weak (but still present) very deep bass.
post #34 of 206
IMHO the Pro 900 is far from being dark, the prominent bass notwithstanding. While we all have different take on what it means to sound bright, to me it means the treble part of the frequency spectrum is overly emphasized. The Pro 900 do not exhibit such frequency anomalies. The 900 however do easily lend itself to be “perceived” as bright. I say “perceived” because its brightness comes from the fact that its treble has a unrelenting and forward quality when it is there in the recording. Listening to the classic jazz recording “Back to Back” by Duke Ellington and Johnny Hodges, when the trumpet jam it has all the sheen and brassy bite there is, bordering on a little piercing on the ears. Compared to another headphone at hand, the treble energy is much lessened and some may prefer it as being smoother and easier on the ears, but my feeling is that the Pro 900 is closer to what the instrument was meant to be voiced.

A related issue, which I feel to be my main reservation with the Pro 900, is a lack of tonality and warmth. The 900 is incredibly resolving and transparent, the edge of instruments played through the 900 are sharply defined. Musical details are put into staking contrast with the 900, but the tonality is missing. The sheen of the violin comes to the front, almost cold, but the warmth and color of the wooden reverberations are less of a portrait. The 900 is like distilled water, clean, clear and transparent, but sometimes I like more flavor of red wine. Just as distilled water do let bright sunlight to pass through unhampered; any treble whiteness and peaky edginess in the recordings will have a ball with the 900, thus the perceived brightness.

I seem to have luck with the S-Logic and could hear the better headstage so promulgated by Ultrasone. To me the other strength of the 900 is the very fast transit response which appears to relate to the elimination of the cone break-up, meaning he incapacity / inertia of loudspeaker cone woofers moving in and out of the air chamber to respond fast enough to demanding musical message, resulting in smearing of dynamics and clarity. Whether because of its light weighted and rigid titanium drivers, I found the 900 to exhibit least of the issue. Music literally starts and stops with no overhang. Recordings of church organ instruments are difficult to reproduce but most readily demonstrate this aspect. Playing through the 900, when the instrument roars from low to high, the 900 groove along seamlessly as it climax while another slower responding phone at hand makes the segments of musical passage a little discontinued.

I have not owned any Ultrasones other than the 900, but my impression is that Ultrasone experience tends to be polarizing. Love it or loath it. I can easily see why the 900 is not for everybody, but what it does well, it does very well.
post #35 of 206
Hi Greeni,

Thanks for your insideful review.
Another polarizing headphone you own is the DT150. How does that one compare to the Pro 900?
It will help me to get a better understanding of this Ultrasone.
post #36 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiemen View Post
Hi Greeni,

Thanks for your insideful review.
Another polarizing headphone you own is the DT150. How does that one compare to the Pro 900?
It will help me to get a better understanding of this Ultrasone.
Hi, it may not be fair for me to describe the difference between the Pro 900 and the DT150, as somehow I feel that I am not giving these high impendence phones its dues for which to shine. Here it goes anyway.

They are very different animals. The DT150 seem to have more of its own prevailing character, almost stoical, but always sounding easy on the ears. Some may equate the gently imposing but pleasing character of the DT150 as coloration, but this is only apparent from a comparison with phones like the Pro 900 which is more like a chameleon. The DT150 is a much more forgiving phone, to this I mean upstream components have lesser of an effect on the overall signature. The Pro 900 however is much more demanding of high quality upstream components, not lest because of its nature borders on being ruthlessly revealing and the high treble energy. The Pro 900 also demands upstream components to be highly balanced, any frequency anomalies and deficiencies tend to be magnified with these phones. Glare and peakiness with upstream equipments will have a ball with these, while the DT150 smooth it out with its ever gentler media touch. The DT150 is a simpler phone, meaning you get more or less the same result and character less dependent on upstream components, while the result you get from Pro 900 depending on synergy will vary so much more diversely.

My main criticism with the Pro 900 is its noticeable lack of warmth and tonality. In direct contrast, these qualities are in much fuller glory with the DT150, which maintains neutrality while adding a touch of warmth and a slight but not overdone sweet tone, not a small feast. Tonal colors are better preserved with the DT150 while the Pro 900 is just plain diluted. The DT150 is also the more textured of the two, reminiscent of being slightly wet and velvet. It is easier to listen to the DT150 for long periods and end up feeling relaxed and revived. While I wouldn’t call the Pro 900 thin bared, the DT150 has an overall denser character, always sounding full bodied, but the edges of musical instrument are not as sharply delineated as the Pro 900. The DT150 also have a richer bloom, and a more tangible and solid foundation in its presentation.

The two phones excel in the PRaT compartment in different ways. The DT150 always sound composed and groove along, never in a haze but always steadfast, it appears to have its own well timed pacing, a “flow” that more readily gets the listener involved. A pleasing and engaging tempo being its strength, I found myself tapping my toes more often with the DT150, while the Pro 900 is more nimble, faster and pick up more subtle dynamic shading. When it comes to complicated musical passage, the DT150 was not up to the Pro 900 in its ability to unrelentingly grab along and follow through as it climax. Personally I feel the fast transit ability of the Pro 900 comes with a price; which when coupled with its treble energy some may found it sometimes just gets too heated.

When it comes to resolution and detail, the Pro 900 rules, but without comparison the detail rendition of the DT150 may well suffice for most purpose. While I do not have the luxury to listen to expensive phones like the Ed 9 or SA5000, I found myself asking if more details could contribute in any meaningful way to the musical experience. This is the strength of the Pro 900. The details are presented in a coherent manner, and it is easier to follow through with the minute degradations from the arising of a musical note to its ending with the Pro 900. The detailing of the Pro 900 is more obvert, while the DT150 with its more laid back and less emphasis on the treble has a more subdue presentation.

Stand alone I would not call the Pro 900 clinical, but when putting up against the DT150 it does seem to lack some warmth and tonality. If the Pro 900 is more cyber, the DT150 has a more human touch to it. When I just want some quiet listening, I found the DT150 to be more involving and easier to get lost in music. The DT150 is epitome of the motto “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts”. The individual elements of warmth, tonality and engaging tempo of the DT150 blend together quite well to make for some good listening when one is not in the analysis mode. There is a elusive ease to the character of the DT150. The overall character of the Pro 900 is much more intense, ruthless and penetrating. It has more insight into the musical event but subjectively, less musicality. It really boils down to what one is looking for, a understanding wife or a sexy bitch.
post #37 of 206
^
Wow, that's the best review of the DT150 I ever read!
I will keep this one.
Thanks a lot.
It saves me from the hassle to buy and try the Pro 900.
I love my understanding wife
post #38 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiemen View Post
^
Wow, that's the best review of the DT150 I ever read!
I will keep this one.
Thanks a lot.
It saves me from the hassle to buy and try the Pro 900.
I love my understanding wife
Glad you like it...but do you concur with your experience of the DT150 ?

English is not my mother tongue, I need a lot of time and look up the dictionary to write reviews like these.
post #39 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greeni View Post
Hi, it may not be fair for me to describe the difference between the Pro 900 and the DT150, as somehow I feel that I am not giving these high impendence phones its dues for which to shine. Here it goes anyway.

They are very different animals. The DT150 seem to have more of its own prevailing character, almost stoical, but always sounding easy on the ears. Some may equate the gently imposing but pleasing character of the DT150 as coloration, but this is only apparent from a comparison with phones like the Pro 900 which is more like a chameleon. The DT150 is a much more forgiving phone, to this I mean upstream components have lesser of an effect on the overall signature. The Pro 900 however is much more demanding of high quality upstream components, not lest because of its nature borders on being ruthlessly revealing and the high treble energy. The Pro 900 also demands upstream components to be highly balanced, any frequency anomalies and deficiencies tend to be magnified with these phones. Glare and peakiness with upstream equipments will have a ball with these, while the DT150 smooth it out with its ever gentler media touch. The DT150 is a simpler phone, meaning you get more or less the same result and character less dependent on upstream components, while the result you get from Pro 900 depending on synergy will vary so much more diversely.

My main criticism with the Pro 900 is its noticeable lack of warmth and tonality. In direct contrast, these qualities are in much fuller glory with the DT150, which maintains neutrality while adding a touch of warmth and a slight but not overdone sweet tone, not a small feast. Tonal colors are better preserved with the DT150 while the Pro 900 is just plain diluted. The DT150 is also the more textured of the two, reminiscent of being slightly wet and velvet. It is easier to listen to the DT150 for long periods and end up feeling relaxed and revived. While I wouldn’t call the Pro 900 thin bared, the DT150 has an overall denser character, always sounding full bodied, but the edges of musical instrument are not as sharply delineated as the Pro 900. The DT150 also have a richer bloom, and a more tangible and solid foundation in its presentation.

The two phones excel in the PRaT compartment in different ways. The DT150 always sound composed and groove along, never in a haze but always steadfast, it appears to have its own well timed pacing, a “flow” that more readily gets the listener involved. A pleasing and engaging tempo being its strength, I found myself tapping my toes more often with the DT150, while the Pro 900 is more nimble, faster and pick up more subtle dynamic shading. When it comes to complicated musical passage, the DT150 was not up to the Pro 900 in its ability to unrelentingly grab along and follow through as it climax. Personally I feel the fast transit ability of the Pro 900 comes with a price; which when coupled with its treble energy some may found it sometimes just gets too heated.

When it comes to resolution and detail, the Pro 900 rules, but without comparison the detail rendition of the DT150 may well suffice for most purpose. While I do not have the luxury to listen to expensive phones like the Ed 9 or SA5000, I found myself asking if more details could contribute in any meaningful way to the musical experience. This is the strength of the Pro 900. The details are presented in a coherent manner, and it is easier to follow through with the minute degradations from the arising of a musical note to its ending with the Pro 900. The detailing of the Pro 900 is more obvert, while the DT150 with its more laid back and less emphasis on the treble has a more subdue presentation.

Stand alone I would not call the Pro 900 clinical, but when putting up against the DT150 it does seem to lack some warmth and tonality. If the Pro 900 is more cyber, the DT150 has a more human touch to it. When I just want some quiet listening, I found the DT150 to be more involving and easier to get lost in music. The DT150 is epitome of the motto “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts”. The individual elements of warmth, tonality and engaging tempo of the DT150 blend together quite well to make for some good listening when one is not in the analysis mode. There is a elusive ease to the character of the DT150. The overall character of the Pro 900 is much more intense, ruthless and penetrating. It has more insight into the musical event but subjectively, less musicality. It really boils down to what one is looking for, a understanding wife or a sexy bitch.
...didnt you describe the dt-150 as muddy in another thread and now youve sold it after having it for 2 weeks
post #40 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by 00264167 View Post
...didnt you describe the dt-150 as muddy in another thread and now youve sold it after having it for 2 weeks
That was when the DT150 has not been properly broken in, and when I only have my portable to drive these high impedence phones. I subsequently got a chance to listen to it properly amped and realised its strength. I may well repurchase another when I am ready to pull the trigger for an expensive amp that works much better than my portable, or may be not....unlike Tiemen, I like the sexy bitch more than an understanding wife, the Pro 900 staying for the moment.
post #41 of 206
Some questions Greeni, how many hours do you have on the Pro900 and just as important, the rest of your equipment! Compared to the other headphones I have the pro900 is actually one of the warmest, this could be due that I always use warm sources (the NAD gear I have), but still.
post #42 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greeni View Post
Hi, it may not be fair for me to describe the difference between the Pro 900 and the DT150, as somehow I feel that I am not giving these high impendence phones its dues for which to shine. Here it goes anyway.

They are very different animals. The DT150 seem to have more of its own prevailing character, almost stoical, but always sounding easy on the ears. Some may equate the gently imposing but pleasing character of the DT150 as coloration, but this is only apparent from a comparison with phones like the Pro 900 which is more like a chameleon. The DT150 is a much more forgiving phone, to this I mean upstream components have lesser of an effect on the overall signature. The Pro 900 however is much more demanding of high quality upstream components, not lest because of its nature borders on being ruthlessly revealing and the high treble energy. The Pro 900 also demands upstream components to be highly balanced, any frequency anomalies and deficiencies tend to be magnified with these phones. Glare and peakiness with upstream equipments will have a ball with these, while the DT150 smooth it out with its ever gentler media touch. The DT150 is a simpler phone, meaning you get more or less the same result and character less dependent on upstream components, while the result you get from Pro 900 depending on synergy will vary so much more diversely.

My main criticism with the Pro 900 is its noticeable lack of warmth and tonality. In direct contrast, these qualities are in much fuller glory with the DT150, which maintains neutrality while adding a touch of warmth and a slight but not overdone sweet tone, not a small feast. Tonal colors are better preserved with the DT150 while the Pro 900 is just plain diluted. The DT150 is also the more textured of the two, reminiscent of being slightly wet and velvet. It is easier to listen to the DT150 for long periods and end up feeling relaxed and revived. While I wouldn’t call the Pro 900 thin bared, the DT150 has an overall denser character, always sounding full bodied, but the edges of musical instrument are not as sharply delineated as the Pro 900. The DT150 also have a richer bloom, and a more tangible and solid foundation in its presentation.

The two phones excel in the PRaT compartment in different ways. The DT150 always sound composed and groove along, never in a haze but always steadfast, it appears to have its own well timed pacing, a “flow” that more readily gets the listener involved. A pleasing and engaging tempo being its strength, I found myself tapping my toes more often with the DT150, while the Pro 900 is more nimble, faster and pick up more subtle dynamic shading. When it comes to complicated musical passage, the DT150 was not up to the Pro 900 in its ability to unrelentingly grab along and follow through as it climax. Personally I feel the fast transit ability of the Pro 900 comes with a price; which when coupled with its treble energy some may found it sometimes just gets too heated.

When it comes to resolution and detail, the Pro 900 rules, but without comparison the detail rendition of the DT150 may well suffice for most purpose. While I do not have the luxury to listen to expensive phones like the Ed 9 or SA5000, I found myself asking if more details could contribute in any meaningful way to the musical experience. This is the strength of the Pro 900. The details are presented in a coherent manner, and it is easier to follow through with the minute degradations from the arising of a musical note to its ending with the Pro 900. The detailing of the Pro 900 is more obvert, while the DT150 with its more laid back and less emphasis on the treble has a more subdue presentation.

Stand alone I would not call the Pro 900 clinical, but when putting up against the DT150 it does seem to lack some warmth and tonality. If the Pro 900 is more cyber, the DT150 has a more human touch to it. When I just want some quiet listening, I found the DT150 to be more involving and easier to get lost in music. The DT150 is epitome of the motto “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts”. The individual elements of warmth, tonality and engaging tempo of the DT150 blend together quite well to make for some good listening when one is not in the analysis mode. There is a elusive ease to the character of the DT150. The overall character of the Pro 900 is much more intense, ruthless and penetrating. It has more insight into the musical event but subjectively, less musicality. It really boils down to what one is looking for, a understanding wife or a sexy bitch.
Nice write-up, thanks.
I completely agree with your description of the PRO900.
I want to add two things to that: I find the PRO900 allready a LOT more organic sounding than the PRO750/2500. Especially the highs are much better.
I also like thew PRO900 better than the ED9. The ED9 are veiled in my experience... Besides, the PRO900 are a lot more comfortable than the ED9.
My PRO900 have only had about 50 hours of use yet, so they may change some in the near future (I hope the bass tightens up a bit).
Another remark: these phones are incredibly good for PIANO. (the pro750 where allready very good for that, but the 900 are even better).
post #43 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greeni View Post
Glad you like it...but do you concur with your experience of the DT150 ?

English is not my mother tongue, I need a lot of time and look up the dictionary to write reviews like these.
Yes, I concur completely
post #44 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kees View Post
Nice write-up, thanks.
I completely agree with your description of the PRO900.
I want to add two things to that: I find the PRO900 allready a LOT more organic sounding than the PRO750/2500. Especially the highs are much better.
I also like thew PRO900 better than the ED9. The ED9 are veiled in my experience... Besides, the PRO900 are a lot more comfortable than the ED9.
My PRO900 have only had about 50 hours of use yet, so they may change some in the near future (I hope the bass tightens up a bit).
Another remark: these phones are incredibly good for PIANO. (the pro750 where allready very good for that, but the 900 are even better).
X2! I love listening to Chopin's Nocturnes on this baby. As piano player myself I have a slight idea of how it should sound, and this baby pretty much nails it. About the ED9 I'm not sure, the ED9 is also amazing imo. Can't wait till my ALO780J arrives to compare it too. As a headsup Kees, this Pro900 takes an enormous time to fully settle, its well over 150hrs. here and I still hear very much changing.
post #45 of 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by ph0rk View Post
Well, I'm sure they do - when I said I'd like closed phones that can hang with the HD650's, I didn't mean they had to sound the same, and my last post might have given that impression.

Rather, I'd like them to have a similar level of refinement (with allowances for the engineering difficulties posed by closed headphones, etc). Some boost in the bass regions is probably inevitable to get good deep bass performance, but I found the DT770-pro 80 approach to this problem unacceptable.

I'd be thrilled if i could find something with the HD650's bass hump shifted down an octave to an octave and a half.
Have you thought of Modded Denon D5000's?
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