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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 60

post #886 of 3714
Mark,

You are one strange dude!

Now that we know that the list is in order of your preference, where do we put the line to separate the top tier from the middle tier to the last tier? Or are these all first tier recordings and the others have already been eliminated?
post #887 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
Mark HFR
You are beyond hope, an incurable sick Mahler addict stripped of any shred of common sense or restraint, in words a perfect addition to discussion.

Your first task is very difficult, but we need to see your three favorite performances for each Mahler symphony......and any short comments that come to mind.
Hail, Dark Angel!

Three favorite performances... OK, I'll give this a shot, but I'll warn you, my favorites are changeable. I think they vary with the barometric pressure or something. For today, here's the forecast:

#1:
1. Horenstein/LSO (Unicorn)- Arguably, this is a "late Mahler" interpretation grafted onto an "early Mahler" work, but it fires me up so much, I feel like I could conquer the world after I hear it. Still too fast in the funeral march, tho.
2. Eschenbach/HSO (Koch)- Not ideally recorded, but Eschenbach is a dedicated (if somewhat interventionist) Mahlerite. I like that he delves into so many of the details that others gloss over.
3. Abbado/CSO (DG)- The early Abbado recording is hard to find now, but it's fresher than the BPO remake, plus the sound seems less processed. Abbado underplays the power a little, but he is again one of the few who actually bothers to read Mahler's score and bring it to life as written: Thus, the constant ebb and flow of tempos during the first movement.

#2:
1. Bernstein (both Sony and DG)- I can't decide between the two Lenny discs. The earlier one is fresher, but the ambition and reach of the later one is amazing.
2. Klemperer/Bavarian RSO (EMI)- I like this even better than the fiery studio recording, except the sound isn't quite as roomy. I do wish that K would pay more attention to the score, though. He tromps right through a lot of Mahler's detailed instructions.
3. ??? In a state of changing opinions right now, can't decided on my 3rd 2nd. Possibilities: Abbado/CSO, poetic & visionary, spaciously recorded; haven't heard his VPO remake. Rattle/CBSO, heard once & was intrigued; need to hear again. Solti/CSO is a great adrenaline rush in M2.

#3:
1. Zander/PO (Telarc)- See the website for my review of this one. In short, it's feisty and alive, and I like it. Best in Z's Mahler cycle so far.
2. Rattle/CBSO (EMI)- A wonderfully fresh performance, recorded far better than any other EMI disc of recent years.
3. Horenstein/LSO (Unicorn)- A little severe in places, but still good. Brass-dominated recording perspective.

#4:
1. Gatti/RPO (RCA)- Daniele Gatti's the real thing. Now that Harmonia Mundi has picked him up, I hope they'll do a Mahler cycle. Gatti's M4 won't be to everyone's taste. He gets inside the details and plays up the eccentric side of the work. Beautifully recorded, too.
2. Inbal/FRSO (Denon)- I haven't heard all of Inbal's cycle (must get that Brilliant box) but of the ones I have heard (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 10) this was the best. All sorts of felicitous touches: gorgeous portamento, detailed tempo adjustments.
3. MTT/SFSO (SFSMedia)- See website for review of this. It is almost unbelievably refined... really otherworldly. MTT takes a rather leisurely stroll through Mahler's countryside. And maybe he keeps the glass window of a limo between himself and all that nature, but it sure is purdy. But reading Jar's comments on this thread reminds me that I need to go back and visit Reiner's recording again. I also enjoy Szell's, though his blatant disregard for Mahler's specified tempo changes continues to irk me.

#5:
1. Gatti/RPO (Conifer)- Currently long gone from the catalogue, but I hope it comes back. Gatti conducts this music like his life depends on it. This one is not recorded as well as the M4 mentioned above, but it's passable.
2. Chailly/RCO (Decca)- Not a big Chailly fan, at least in Mahler, but the Concertgebouw knows what to do here, and he lets them do it. Recorded sound is luscious, and I love hearing the obbligato horn in the scherzo up in front.
3. Tennstedt/LPO (EMI)- This is the live recording from 1991, not the studio recording in the box set. Very hard to find, but worth the search. This is Tennstedt post-cancer, so it is very contemplative, quite slow in places, but done with great intensity. It remains an individual performance, not the sort of thing you'd want to listen to everyday, but great for special occasions. Tennstedt is one of the few who "gets" it in the trio of the scherzo: The pizzicato strings quietly start an introspective waltz, then a bassoon joins them, they stop and the bassoon trails off, then the strings resume the waltz. This moment usually passes by poker-faced in most performances, but the first time I heard Tennstedt's live version, I was shocked. He makes it into a personality-driven vignette: The strings start their guitar-like strum, then the bassoon enters very loudly and rudely. The strings suddenly pull way back and the bassoon is left to trail off like a loud jerk that suddenly realizes he's just made an ass of himself. Then the strings resume and an oboe oh-so-carefully joins in, and after a moment of doubt, the strings accept the oboe, and then everyone else gradually joins in. I was shocked at Tennstedt's handling of this moment. It was like a little operatic scene for instruments. And then I dug out my Mahler 5 score... and found that Tennstedt was doing the passage exactly as written. How many others have missed this charming, hilarious slice-of-life scene? Almost all of them. I should point out that the live Tennstedt is from a concert in the Royal Festival Hall, which means that the sound is not very good. But I hope that doesn't keep EMI from reissuing this some day.

#6:
1. Zander/PO (Telarc)- See website for review. Powerful and relentless, this piece is right up Z's alley. He tears into it like a barroom brawl. Fine recording.
2. Bernstein/VPO (DG)- I'm probably the only person who generally likes Bernstein's DG cycle better than his earlier Columbia cycle. I find the earlier versions not completely formed interpretively, whereas the later ones are. This one is devastatingly committed. OK recording, though a little harsh.
3. Boulez/VPO (DG)- Amazingly lucid, without seeming remote. Best of the Boulez cycle, both in performance and recording.

#7:
1. Rattle/CBSO (EMI)- The first movement isn't ideally focused, but Rattle & Co find an endlessly creative supply of characterizations for this restless piece. Best is the scherzo, where they find some really whacked-out textures. Decently recorded.
2. Solti/CSO (Decca)- I'm a little leery of relentlessly fast performances of this work (which is to say most all performances), but this one is so hyped-up and giddy, I can't resist it. Somewhat garish early 70's recording.
3. Bernstein/NYP (DG)- Amazingly penetrating. Decently recorded.

#8:
1. Horenstein/LSO (BBC)- Cosmic scope of a great conductor caught in a moment of live intensity in shockingly good sound.
2. Sinopoli/PO (DG)- Lyrical and quirky, best from Sinopoli's cycle. Spacious recording.
3. Solti/CSO (Decca)- Still amazing in its high-voltage excitement. Listenable recording.

#9:
1. Horenstein/LSO (Music & Arts)- This is not to be confused with the BBC issue of a live Mahler 9 from September of 1966 by these same forces. This was from April of that year, and was a regular concert. The Proms "revival" was evidently done with a minimum of rehearsal, so it loses much of the fanatical intensity of Horenstein's detailing. The sad thing is that the Proms version has much better recorded sound. The M&A version basically sounds like a mono aircheck, but it is worth listening to (if you can stand it), because Horenstein was more "on" this night than in September, and his timpanist doesn't get lost in the third movement, either. The audience is noisier and there are more flubbed notes in April, but it is a more searing performance, especially in the second movement.
2. Bernstein/RCO (DG)- Hyper-emotional, but vivid like no other. Decent sound.
3. Abbado/BPO (DG)- After some years in the 1990's where he seemed to get caught up in fussing with refining the BPO's sound, Abbado was nearly taken out by stomach cancer. He has since recovered and, boy, did it refocus his priorities. This recent live 9th burns like a laser beam. Tolerable recording.

#10 Adagio only:
1. Sinopoli/PO (DG)- Slow, torturous, cerebral expostulation of this movement, truly emphasizes its otherworldliness. Decent recorded sound.

#10 Cooke version:
1. Wigglesworth/BBCNOW- Refer to Masonjar's comments earlier on this thread. I was at that concert, too, and was equally blown away. This recording is good, though nowhere in the league of that concert. Wigglesworth is amazing, and sooner or later a major orchestra is going to realize it and snap him up. Hello, are you listening, Chicago???
2. Rattle/CBSO- I have the new Rattle/BPO version, but I haven't been able to bring myself to listen to it much. (Same boat as Masonjar, after the W concert.) Since I haven't listened to it much, it hasn't had a chance yet to supplant the older CBSO version with its frightening drum thwacks.

Das Lied: (which might as well be included in the symphonies)
#1. Horenstein/BBCNSO- Intense, etched-in-stone sort of performance. Slower than any other performance. Also slower than any other conductor could handle it. Alfreda Hodgson's greatest moment. Decent recorded sound.
#2. Klemperer/PO- Typically direct, emotional Mahler from Klemperer with no corners rounded off. Just amazing. The recording is a little gauche, but it doesn't ultimately matter in the wake of such a communicative performance. Wunderlich is wunderbar, and Christa Ludwig is second to none.
#3. Haitink/RCO- Refined but sincere, Haitink's recording has an exquisite poise that suits this music perfectly. Janet Baker is wonderful.

Whew, there it be-- for the moment, at least. I'm sure I'll disagree with this list soon, or realize I inexplicably left off some favorites. I just got a review copy of the MTT M9, and look forward to tearing into that sometime in the next week or so.

Cheers,
Mark
post #888 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder
We're like a support group. As in we support the classical labels in their sales!

Welcome!

Scott

Thanks, Scott! I am convinced that I should receive some sort of trophy for keeping several labels afloat myself, and that's just with the Mahler collection!
post #889 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
Nice to see Maurice Abravanel represented. Welcome!
Hi, Doc, and thanks for the warm welcome from you and everyone else! I had the luck of finding the Abravanel set used a couple of years back, so I've enjoyed exploring it.

Mark
post #890 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Mark,

You are one strange dude!

Now that we know that the list is in order of your preference, where do we put the line to separate the top tier from the middle tier to the last tier? Or are these all first tier recordings and the others have already been eliminated?
Bunnyears,

Thanks! I should get a business card printed that says "Mark Jordan: One Strange Dude". That would pretty much sum things up.

As for the list of 1's:

top tier:
Horenstein/LSO
Horenstein/VSO
Eschenbach/HSO
Abbado/CSO
Abbado/BPO
Solti/CSO
Bernstein/NYP
Bernstein/RCO
Walter/NYP
Walter/Columbia SO
Tennstedt/LPO
Tennstedt/CSO
Giulini/CSO
Judd/Florida PO
Kubelik/Bavarian RSO
Inbal/Frankfurt RSO
MTT/SFSO
Steinberg/PSO
Kondrashin/MPO

middle tier:
Maazel/ONF
Maazel/VPO
Haitink/RCO
Haitink/BPO
Mehta/IPO
Mitropoulos/Minnesota O
Scherchen/VSOO
Boulez/CSO
Neumann/Czech PO
Abravanel/USO
Muti/Philadelphia O
Dohnanyi/Cleveland O
Ozawa/BSO
Leinsdorf/BSO
Leinsdorf/RPO
Bertini/Cologne RSO
Davis/Bavarian RSO
Vonk/SLSO
Ancerl/Czech PO
Kletzki/Philharmonia O
Masur/NYP
Sinopoli/Philharmonia O

bottom tier:
Honeck/BBCSO
Levine/CSO
Slatkin/SLSO
Boult/LPO
Levi/ASO
Ormandy/Philadelphia O
Markevitch/Turin RSO

I had to move the Kondrashin and Steinberg, which I forgot initially. They both belong in the top tier.

Mark
post #891 of 3714
Mark,


Thanks for the revised listings! With respect to the Kubelik, do you prefer the Audite or the DG editions?

Now, on to the M2. (Please breathe before you start this!)
post #892 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
#4
2. Inbal/FRSO (Denon)- I haven't heard all of Inbal's cycle (must get that Brilliant box) but of the ones I have heard (1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 10) this was the best. All sorts of felicitous touches: gorgeous portamento, detailed tempo adjustments.
I distinctly remember you refering to the soprano soloist's performace in the last movement as "battle-like" (and I don't think you were refering to Kathleen either) hehehe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
#6:
1. Zander/PO (Telarc)- See website for review. Powerful and relentless, this piece is right up Z's alley. He tears into it like a barroom brawl. Fine recording.
2. Bernstein/VPO (DG)- I'm probably the only person who generally likes Bernstein's DG cycle better than his earlier Columbia cycle. I find the earlier versions not completely formed interpretively, whereas the later ones are. This one is devastatingly committed. OK recording, though a little harsh.
3. Boulez/VPO (DG)- Amazingly lucid, without seeming remote. Best of the Boulez cycle, both in performance and recording.
Is the Levine still near the top for the 6th? It's been so long since I heard it, but I remember it being quite good. I loaned the tape to someone and never got it back. I remember it being one of our favorites way back.. You know, I still haven't heard the Barberolli that everyone raves about. I'll have to give the Boulez another spin one of these days. I don't recall it rocking my world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
#7:
1. Rattle/CBSO (EMI)- The first movement isn't ideally focused, but Rattle & Co find an endlessly creative supply of characterizations for this restless piece. Best is the scherzo, where they find some really whacked-out textures. Decently recorded.
2. Solti/CSO (Decca)- I'm a little leery of relentlessly fast performances of this work (which is to say most all performances), but this one is so hyped-up and giddy, I can't resist it. Somewhat garish early 70's recording.
3. Bernstein/NYP (DG)- Amazingly penetrating. Decently recorded.
Lenny must have improved, because I distinctly remember NOT liking his earlier 7th at all. Was the Levine the first 7th we heard? I remember that the scherzo really fascinated us because we hadn't hear anything quite like that in any of his other works.. I still dig that one quite a bit, with it's bottom heavy sound.. The Abbado has always been a favorite too, that recording is a little more balanced, but also more etheriel..


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
#9:
1. Horenstein/LSO (Music & Arts)- This is not to be confused with the BBC issue of a live Mahler 9 from September of 1966 by these same forces. This was from April of that year, and was a regular concert. The Proms "revival" was evidently done with a minimum of rehearsal, so it loses much of the fanatical intensity of Horenstein's detailing. The sad thing is that the Proms version has much better recorded sound. The M&A version basically sounds like a mono aircheck, but it is worth listening to (if you can stand it), because Horenstein was more "on" this night than in September, and his timpanist doesn't get lost in the third movement, either. The audience is noisier and there are more flubbed notes in April, but it is a more searing performance, especially in the second movement.
2. Bernstein/RCO (DG)- Hyper-emotional, but vivid like no other. Decent sound.
3. Abbado/BPO (DG)- After some years in the 1990's where he seemed to get caught up in fussing with refining the BPO's sound, Abbado was nearly taken out by stomach cancer. He has since recovered and, boy, did it refocus his priorities. This recent live 9th burns like a laser beam. Tolerable recording.
I have the Horenstein 9th on Vox. Is that the same one? Definately not the best recording ever made, sound-wise. Have you ever sought out the Dohnanyi recording on Decca? I saw it on Amazon and almost snatched it.. bu' I didn't.

I suppose Guilini is still top o' the heap for me, and I do also enjoy the Karajan studio recording, never actually bought the live one that came after. I'd like to hear that newer Abbado too, the older one is nice, but it's a little cool at times, and I don't care for some of his tempos. The Boulez is nice, but it doesn't quite do it for me.

Often I've tried to remember all the Mahler concerts I've been to over the years.. I think at one point in this thread I listed them. I might need your assistance though to remember some of them. Who/what did we go see in Pittsburgh 4 years ago, for the life of me, I can't remember. Was it Previn?
My mind is going..

-jar
post #893 of 3714
Nice to see the upswing of Zander popularity.

I've liked everything I have heard (I have not heard them all) of his new cycle so far. The combination of interpretation, sonics (especially on the SACD versions), price and the wonderful commentary disc make these absolute no-brainers for newbies, and serious contenders for everybody.
post #894 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar
I distinctly remember you refering to the soprano soloist's performace in the last movement as "battle-like" (and I don't think you were refering to Kathleen either) hehehe.

Mwahaha! Yes, I still think Helen Donath comes in a little too vigorously!

Is the Levine still near the top for the 6th? It's been so long since I heard it, but I remember it being quite good. I loaned the tape to someone and never got it back. I remember it being one of our favorites way back.. You know, I still haven't heard the Barberolli that everyone raves about. I'll have to give the Boulez another spin one of these days. I don't recall it rocking my world.

Yes, Levine just misses the top swath. Still love his way with that glissando in the violins... I've got the Barbirolli. Come down some time for a listening party, and we'll give it a spin. As for Boulez, it's amazingly clear and structured, but he doesn't even attempt world-rocking. It's more of a cerebral take, but very well done.

Lenny must have improved, because I distinctly remember NOT liking his earlier 7th at all. Was the Levine the first 7th we heard? I remember that the scherzo really fascinated us because we hadn't hear anything quite like that in any of his other works.. I still dig that one quite a bit, with it's bottom heavy sound.. The Abbado has always been a favorite too, that recording is a little more balanced, but also more etheriel..


Yah, I've never liked Lenny's early 7 much. Later is much better. And yes, Levine was our big entrance into the weird world of the 7th. Have you ever heard Klemperer's 7? It runs about 20 minutes longer than Levine's!

I have the Horenstein 9th on Vox. Is that the same one? Definately not the best recording ever made, sound-wise. Have you ever sought out the Dohnanyi recording on Decca? I saw it on Amazon and almost snatched it.. bu' I didn't.

Horenstein's Vox 9 is earlier 1954... and the sound is better than the Spring 66 live version (!). Yes, I picked up Doc's 9 and I'm still very impressed with his first movement. He doesn't so much drive the climaxes as he lets them implode, a significant touch.

Often I've tried to remember all the Mahler concerts I've been to over the years.. I think at one point in this thread I listed them. I might need your assistance though to remember some of them. Who/what did we go see in Pittsburgh 4 years ago, for the life of me, I can't remember. Was it Previn?
My mind is going..

-jar
Yes, Pittsburgh a few years back was (of all people!) Previn doing Mahler's 9th. First two movements were pretty awful and then suddenly the last two movements were fantastic. Still one of the strangest concerts I've been to. Here's what I recall of my live adventures, and you were at most of them:

1 Dohnanyi/CO 1989
1 Ashkenazy/CO 1994
2 Jahja Ling/CO 1998
2 Dohnanyi/CO 2000
2 Boulez/CSO 2002 (you weren't at this one)
3 Ashkenazy/CO 1996
4 Boulez/CO 1998
5 Dohnanyi/CO 1988
5 MTT/LSO 1989
5 Eschenbach/CO 1997
5 Lopez-Cobos/Cincy CO 2001 (you weren't at this one)
5 Dohnanyi/CO 2001 (were you at this one? week of 9/11)
5 MTT/SFSO 2004 (I don't think you were at this one)
6 Dohnanyi/CO 1987
6 Dohnanyi/CO 1991
6 MTT/CO 2003
7 Boulez/CO 1997
Das Lied Dohnanyi/CO 1999 (you weren't at this one)
Das Lied Ashkenazy/CO 2002 (did you catch this one?)
9 Dohnanyi/CO 1991
9 Boulez/CSO 1995
9 Dohnanyi/CO 1998
9 Previn/PSO 2000
10A Dohnanyi/CO 1990
10C Wigglesworth/CO 2002

I think that's everything. As far as I can remember, anyway.

Mark
post #895 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Mark,


Thanks for the revised listings! With respect to the Kubelik, do you prefer the Audite or the DG editions?

Now, on to the M2. (Please breathe before you start this!)

Bunnyears,

You know, I haven't heard the Audite Kub M1 yet, but it's on my list of ones to get (This list which somehow never seems to be finished). I thought the M5 on Audite just blew the studio recording away, so I'm eager to hear that one.

Two's:

Top tier:
Bernstein/NYP (Sony)
Bernstein/NYP (DG)
Klemperer/Bavarian RSO
Klemperer/PO
Abbado/CSO
Tennstedt/LPO
Solti/CSO
Walter/NYP
Mehta/VPO
Barbirolli/Stuttgart RSO
Inbal/Frankfurt RSO
Scherchen/VSOO (despite rough playing and recording)

Middle tier:
Mata/DSO
Maazel/VPO
Neumann/Czech PO
Dohnanyi/CO (stolid tempos, but nice characterizations)
Gielen/Stuttgart RSO
Farberman/LSO
Haitink/BPO

Bottom tier:
Stokowski/LSO
Abravanel/USO
Ozawa/Saito Kinen O
Sinopoli/PO (great touches here and there, but often sounds tired)
Klemperer/VSO (ranked low due to awful recording)
Mehta/IPO

and one special case: Oskar Fried and the Berlin State Opera Orchestra. Mahler disciple Fried's undertaking the goal of recording a Mahler symphony in 1923 was as noble as it was absurd. The orchestra is tiny, the recording hopelessly dim, and the playing isn't very good either. BUT, despite all of that, you can hear elements in Fried's interpretation that combine the fire of Klemperer with the lyricism of Walter. It makes me think that THIS approach was closer to Mahler than either of those more-famous disciples' recordings.


Mark
post #896 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
Nice to see the upswing of Zander popularity.

I've liked everything I have heard (I have not heard them all) of his new cycle so far. The combination of interpretation, sonics (especially on the SACD versions), price and the wonderful commentary disc make these absolute no-brainers for newbies, and serious contenders for everybody.
Doc,

I've become a big Zander fan in the last few years. It's easy from a critical point of view to carp at what he's not: Refined, quiet, soothingly genial. But, man, he can generate some electricity in the right kind of music!! I tried last year to convince him to undertake doing the Cooke Mahler 10 or some other version, but he refuses to consider it, on the grounds that it needs too much editorial work and he doesn't feel he has a strong enough compositional background to do that.

Mark
post #897 of 3714

Mahler Symphonies

Hello all,

another Mahler freak here. Has anyone heard Barbirolli's Mahler One? There are two versions that I know of. One is with the Halle Orchestra on Dutton, and the other is in the very expensive NYPO box set. The NYPO version has a better orchestra, but the Halle has a better recording. I would probably go for the Dutton on balance, but it is well worth hearing. Perhaps not a 'library version' but still interesting and the glissandi in the second movement are just fanstatic.

Also with reference to the live Tennstedt Mahler 5 for anybody in Britain it has been rereleased in the new HMV Classics series so is available for about £5.

My Mahler Ones include

BPO/Abbado
LPO/Tennstedt
CSO/Tennstedt
Concertgebouw/Bernstein
LSO/Solti
BRSO/Kubelik (DG version)
Halle/Barbirolli
NYPO/Barbirolli
FRSO/Inbal
IPO/Mehta
PO/Sinopoli
Concertgebouw/Haitink (live)
BPO/Haitink
CBSO/Rattle
SFSO/Tilson Thomas
CSO/Giulini
Columbia Symphony Orchestra (I think)/Walter
RPO/Litton

It's a bit scary to see that I have that many especially as No 1 is not my favourite Mahler symphony!

Are there any that I have missed out on that I should investigate?
post #898 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartley Shawcros
Hello all,

another Mahler freak here. My Mahler Ones include

CBSO/Rattle

Are there any that I have missed out on that I should investigate?
Hi, Hartley. I'll have to look for the Barbirolli, I'd like to hear it. Is there much interpretive difference between the NYP and Halle performances?

Is the Rattle worth tracking down?

As for others worth investigating, I recommend the Horenstein/LSO and Eschenbach/Houston SO recordings. They give the piece more weight than most, and it can handle it.

Mark
post #899 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Hi, Hartley. I'll have to look for the Barbirolli, I'd like to hear it. Is there much interpretive difference between the NYP and Halle performances?

Is the Rattle worth tracking down?

As for others worth investigating, I recommend the Horenstein/LSO and Eschenbach/Houston SO recordings. They give the piece more weight than most, and it can handle it.

Mark

Hi Mark

The Halle version is quicker in every movement than the NYPO version, but not as well played. As I said, on the whole, I prefer the Dutton version (it's the version on my Ipod) not least because it has much better recorded sound (it's in stereo) and doesn't suffer from the noisy audience. Although I think I will listen to them now, just to confirm that

As for the Rattle it's a rather steady performance, not really as good as the very best, or I should say my favourites, (Barbirolli, Bernstein (DG), Kubelik, Tennstedt (LPO version)), but for the Mahler completist, like me, it does include a performance of Blumine, the movement Mahler dropped.

Hartley.
post #900 of 3714

Corrections

I've just listened to the Barbirolli Halle version and I'm now listening to the Barbirolli New York Phil version, and my opinion has changed. (Remarkable how the reality of a performance isn't always what we remembered isn't it?) The New York version is much better. The Halle version lacks mystery and for want of a better word, charm. The recording is better than I remembered as well, definitely nothing to worry about if you can take the Oskar Fried Mahler 2. There are some audience noises at the start of the first movement, but the performance makes up for it. So, now I must say neither Barbirolli version would by my first choice. The recording and cost stops the NYPO version and the orchestral playing stops the Halle version. In addition the Dutton remastering has no pauses between movements. So if you want a Barbirolli Mahler one, and can stand mono recordings the NYPO box is the one to get, but who would pay over $200 for the sake of one CD? Maybe I should get out my Kubelik one next to see if that is as I remember it?
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