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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 51

post #751 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by zhentil
Just picked up the Brilliant Classics boxed set on Ebay for $19. This one has the famous Horenstein 3rd and also some relatively obscure, but well-reviewed other ones (Haenchen and Neumann). Anybody else have this set? What are your reactions?
Neumann 2nd? If so, that's a good'n!

-jar
post #752 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar
Neumann 2nd? If so, that's a good'n!

-jar
Sorry...........2nd is Hans Vonk, Neumann is 5 & 9, here is the info:

Mahler
post #753 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
...for M2, performed by the Utah Symphony under Keith Lockhart. May 7th. My first live M2.

The Utah Symphony was one of the first to record Mahler, so there is a historical connection here as well. I can't wait!
This Saturday night! Can't wait!!!

http://www.utahsymphony.org/concert_...ail.cfm?id=364
post #754 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
The Utah Symphony was one of the first to record Mahler, so there is a historical connection here as well. I can't wait!
Doc,

You know that Abravanel was one of Alma Schindler Mahler Gropius Werfel's many lovers, don't you? She and her third husband, poet and author Franz Werfel fled Germany when the Nazis came into power (Werfel was Jewish, and although Alma was not, her daughter Anna Mahler, Gustav's daughter was in danger). On the way to America, they stopped at Lourdes where
Werfel was inspired to write his famous book, The Song of Bernadette. After they came to the USA, they settled in Hollywood, the book was turned into a movie with the young starlet that David Selznick was sleeping with, Jennifer Jones, who won the oscar for the portrayal (they later married after Selznick divorced Irene Mayer, daughter of Louis B.). Alma got bored with life in California and set off travelling around the country to promote her first husband Mahler's music with Franz in tow. When she arrived in Utah, she and Abravanel hit it off, and poor Franz, as usual, just smiled and shrugged.

I would say that there certainly is a lot of history there!
post #755 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears

I'll probably order the EMI because of the pricepoint, but the Barbirolli NYPO recordings look so good as well. ($225/12 = 18.75 per cd <<UGH>> $225 + 8.25% = $243.56 <<YIKES>> ) Major Conflict!!! (~$20.30 per cd )

I guess you can appreciate why I am hesitating at this point, especially when I am spending so much money upgrading my audio/dvd system.
Well, there is Team Source First, but then there is Team Music First. Without the software, audio systems would be useless.

But if the music is out of print or limited release, BUY IT BUY IT! Or you'll kick yourself later for having to bend over on eBay for it later.

I've done this a few times myself.

-Ed
post #756 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Doc,

You know that Abravanel was one of Alma Schindler Mahler Gropius Werfel's many lovers, don't you? She and her third husband, poet and author Franz Werfel fled Germany when the Nazis came into power (Werfel was Jewish, and although Alma was not, her daughter Anna Mahler, Gustav's daughter was in danger). On the way to America, they stopped at Lourdes where
Werfel was inspired to write his famous book, The Song of Bernadette. After they came to the USA, they settled in Hollywood, the book was turned into a movie with the young starlet that David Selznick was sleeping with, Jennifer Jones, who won the oscar for the portrayal (they later married after Selznick divorced Irene Mayer, daughter of Louis B.). Alma got bored with life in California and set off travelling around the country to promote her first husband Mahler's music with Franz in tow. When she arrived in Utah, she and Abravanel hit it off, and poor Franz, as usual, just smiled and shrugged.

I would say that there certainly is a lot of history there!
I knew that Abravanel knew Alma Mahler, but nothing beyond that. Abravanel was the first American to record a complete Mahler cycle; I wonder if this had anything to do with it?
post #757 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
Don't have this but have read that it is a one trick pony set......you are buying it for Horenstein 3rd, remaining performances are just average. But for $19 you get perhaps best performance of 3rd available so not bad deal.

The Inbal/Brilliant Classics set is of higher "overall" quality performance wise taken as a whole, but does not have a standout true reference performance like Horenstein 3rd......also costs a bit more.
Considering that the cheapest Horenstein 3rd I can find is $30+ (and $80+ on Amazon), this is definitely worth it, even if I can't find any other decent performances out of the lot. I was just hoping there was perhaps another good one in the set.
post #758 of 3714

Interesting M2 Link

Don't know if this has already been posted, but...

http://www.classicalnotes.net/classics/mahlersym2.html
post #759 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
I knew that Abravanel knew Alma Mahler, but nothing beyond that. Abravanel was the first American to record a complete Mahler cycle; I wonder if this had anything to do with it?
You bet it does. Alma was actually a famous femme fatale. She liked to say that she received her first kiss from Gustav Klimt with whom she was linked before her marriage to Mahler. You have, I am sure seen Klimt's famous painting of "The Kiss "? After the death of Mahler she became the mistress of the artist Kokoschka and then married and divorced the architect Walter Gropius before finally marrying Werfel. She was a very colorful personality, and originally had aspirations to be a composer herself (frustrated by Gustav Mahler's patronizing attitude). When their marriage became difficult, Gustav Mahler consulted the local psychoanalyst in Vienna, a Dr. S. Freud, also part of their circle. Oh to have been a fly on the wall at those sessions!
post #760 of 3714
Well, it's been 24 hours since the M2 concert in Abravanel Hall, and even though I had to fly across the USA today on business, I'm still buzzing from last night's music! What an amazing experience. The first thing I said to my wife as we walked out of the hall last night was, "I hope I get the chance to hear M2 live again, sometime in my life." Truly a life-changing experience.

Among the millions of things I could talk about, were the earth-shattering crescendos in the 1st, the pizzicatos in the 2nd, the Urlicht (oh, man) and finally the choral entrance in the 5th. "Sublime" is a cheap adjective; this was really beyond description.

Interestingly enough, the offstage effects alone cement the fact that Mahler MUST be experienced live for full impact. The "great call" sounded like it was coming from another world.

The soprano and mezzo were both in tears as the concert ended with a ten-minute standing ovation. Mind-blowing.

What a freakin' genius Mahler was!
post #761 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
Well, it's been 24 hours since the M2 concert in Abravanel Hall, and even though I had to fly across the USA today on business, I'm still buzzing from last night's music! What an amazing experience. The first thing I said to my wife as we walked out of the hall last night was, "I hope I get the chance to hear M2 live again, sometime in my life." Truly a life-changing experience.

Among the millions of things I could talk about, were the earth-shattering crescendos in the 1st, the pizzicatos in the 2nd, the Urlicht (oh, man) and finally the choral entrance in the 5th. "Sublime" is a cheap adjective; this was really beyond description.

Interestingly enough, the offstage effects alone cement the fact that Mahler MUST be experienced live for full impact. The "great call" sounded like it was coming from another world.

The soprano and mezzo were both in tears as the concert ended with a ten-minute standing ovation. Mind-blowing.

What a freakin' genius Mahler was!
I remember the first time hearing the Grosse Appel in concert and it definately is one of the most amazing experiences I've had.

There's nothing quite like a Mahler concert. Especially when everything clicks.

-jar
post #762 of 3714
i'm peagreen with envy!
post #763 of 3714
I also enjoyed seeing Christoph von Dohnányi lead the BSO on the M1, I'd love to be able to see anM2 performed, I may just need to catch Levine on the M8 later this year!

I'm also getting my hands on a recording of the Broadcast of this (it was broadcast on WCRB).

Scott
post #764 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
Well, it's been 24 hours since the M2 concert in Abravanel Hall, and even though I had to fly across the USA today on business, I'm still buzzing from last night's music! What an amazing experience. The first thing I said to my wife as we walked out of the hall last night was, "I hope I get the chance to hear M2 live again, sometime in my life." Truly a life-changing experience.

Among the millions of things I could talk about, were the earth-shattering crescendos in the 1st, the pizzicatos in the 2nd, the Urlicht (oh, man) and finally the choral entrance in the 5th. "Sublime" is a cheap adjective; this was really beyond description.

Interestingly enough, the offstage effects alone cement the fact that Mahler MUST be experienced live for full impact. The "great call" sounded like it was coming from another world.

The soprano and mezzo were both in tears as the concert ended with a ten-minute standing ovation. Mind-blowing.

What a freakin' genius Mahler was!
my gosh - you have no idea how envious i am of you. i dont think the 2nd has ever been played in my country before. the 1st, 5th and 8th have though. but not the 2nd!
post #765 of 3714
Here's what I have now:

1. Abravanel, MTT;
2. Abravanel, Kaplan (2003);
3. Abravanel, Boulez;
4. Reiner, Abravanel; Davis;
5. Bernstein, Abravanel;
6. Zander;
7. Abravanel, Levine;
8. Abravanel;
9. Jesus-Lopez;
10. Don't have
Das Lied: Davis

My questions:

1. What (besides 10) am I obviously missing? I was thinking of Klemperer for 2; any other no-brainers to round out my list?
2. What is everyone's favorite version of 10? I've been reluctant to explore it since there are alternative completions - which is considered the best?
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