Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 188

post #2806 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aman View Post
I'm thinking about heading to Carnegie Hall to catch Eschenbach's M2. Worth it?
I've got tickets, so I think it is.

Eschenbach has 2 Mahler recordings: Symphony No. 6 with the Philadelphia Orchestra (10/10 at ClassicsToday) and M1 with the Houston Symphony Orchestra (unrated) which is very good as well.

Hopefully, this M2 will be a great event. Btw, on January 23, he's conducting Bruckner 9 and Thomas Quasthoff singing the Kindertotenlieder. As I subscribed to the Philadelphia series I'm going to that as well. I have very high hopes for the evening.

post #2807 of 3690

Mahler in 3D!

Heard about this on a mailing list:



GUSTAV MAHLER
Vision Mahler
Symphony No. 2 ‘Resurrection’

Live from the Philharmonie Cologne, 1st January 2006

Karina Gauvin (soprano), Yvonne Naef (alto)

WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln, NDR Choir, WDR Radio Choir / Semyon Bychkov

3D Visualisation by Johannes Deutsch and Ars Electronica Futurelab Linz

BONUS MATERIAL:

Making of VISION OF MAHLER / Interview with Seymon Bychkov / “FACEDREAM” by Johannes Deutsch


Sound Format: PCM Stereo, DD 5.1

Picture Format: 16:9

Menu Languages: GB, D, FR, ES

Running Time: 87 mins + 48 mins Bonus Material

DVD 9 NTSC

Region Code: 0



“What a world this is that brings forth such sounds and shapes as its reflected likeness!” Gustav Mahler



Vision Mahler, the abstract visualization of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 in C minor (the ‘Resurrection’ Symphony), premièred on January 1, 2006 in Cologne at a gala concert staged to celebrate the 50th anniversary of WDR, a western German public broadcasting company. The work was performed under the direction of Semyon Bychkov before a live audience in Cologne’s Philharmonic Hall and simulcast on TV.



Special projections allow eighteen 3D objects to mirror the emotions and feelings conjured up by this powerful music. The thematic junctures and stages of the Symphony – suffering, romanticism, irony, love, doubt and hope—are correlated to the transformation of these virtual objects. In the first movement, for example, objects assemble, form structures and then break down; in the second movement they dance, radiate and shine; the third movement infuses the forms with irony and distorts them; love is aglow with light in the fourth movement, and is succeeded in the fifth by tremors and destruction. Not until the finale does redemption make its appearance – everything shimmers, sails and floats away.



Preset camera paths along with special glasses help give the television audience the illusion of a spatial expansion of the TV image. Thus, a visualization of Mahler’s 2nd Symphony from several different angles is made available to the TV viewing audience.



Arthaus Musik DVD NTSC 101421
post #2808 of 3690
^ Words fail me...
post #2809 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder View Post
Special projections allow eighteen 3D objects to mirror the emotions and feelings conjured up by this powerful music.
Help!! Ahhh! The oboe solo caused a projection of a giant cream puff with fangs, and now it's chasing me around the room. Ah!!!!! Help!!!!!!
post #2810 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder View Post




Some things should really be left to the imagination!

Mark,

Just don't think of the Pillsbury Doughboy.

post #2811 of 3690
All: I picked up the new Fischer Mahler 2 SACD on a business trip in CA last week, and just listened to the first movement. I will return later with comments on the performance (after I hear the whole thing) but from the 1st movement alone I can say that this is sonically a MUST-OWN.

More info to come...
post #2812 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
And here I was thinking everyone had abandoned this thread...

Well, I do have news. In today's mail was the new M2 with Ivan Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra on Channel Classics. I've listened to it once, and here's my first impression:

The SACD sound is stupendously good. Extremely natural, unforced. The detail in the woodwinds is magnificent. No distortions, even when the organ, choir and all are blasting away.

Performance: very accurate, very precise attention to details. Some wonderful old world touches, such as string portamento handled better than I've ever heard. Singing is excellent. At first the conductor seems somewhat detached, almost like Boulez or Maazel, but don't fret, by the end he's really letting it rip, and the cumulative effect is overwhelming.

I wasn't too keen on Fischer, given his decision of the placement of the scherzo/andante in M6, but here he has totally convinced me that he is a Mahlerian to be reckoned with. I hope this indicates a full Mahler cycle to come. It so, it will set a high standard for SACD versions -- this M2 is much, much better than recent ones I've tried, like MTT, Boulez, Abaddo. Will this replace my favorite M2, Blomstedt? Maybe -- it really is wonderful.

For what it's worth, I really enjoyed Fischer's recent Rachmaninoff 2nd, and I know some people find it too cultured and civilized. I think his Mahler is similar -- it is more about Mahler and less about the conductor, the antipode of Bernstein.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears View Post
I'm so glad to hear that this M2 is really worth the wait.
Doc,

Glad to see that you have picked up this M2. I received mine weeks ago but was too busy to post my impressions (all favorable). Both mb and I have given it the "Sorry for your Wallet" seal of approval. Btw, the sound on this cd is probably among the best that I have heard for anything, especially in multichannel sound. The sacds coming out in this quality actually surpass the sound of vinyl, imo. There's no hiss or static or any other artifact that you get from vinyl, and it's as warm as you could wish. It's just pure, wonderful, musical sound.

post #2813 of 3690
Just got back from a weeklong trip to southern CA. Need to report on the LA Philharmonic performance of the Mahler 7th. They were recording it for iTunes. No way is the Sunday matinee going that way. Principal trumpet made a major screw up in the first movement entering at one point a couple of bars early. The tenor horn was, for once, played on real European style rotary valve tenor horn, and not a euphonium that everyone else seems to use. And it made a large, noticable tonal difference.
Salonen is a fine conductor, but I'm not sure he's a natural Mahlerian. The 2nd movement was fine -- quicker than normal. The third was not spooky, not dramatic, almost too pleasant. The fourth movement was very nice. Very fine balancing of guitar and mandolin. The finale followed segue with a riotous timpani playing fff, not the single f in the score -- really exciting. The finale was a marvel of orchestral execution. But, alas, nearing the end, Salonen lost the momentum and the audience lost interest. It was getting turgid and dull. Then, Salonen woke up and the coda was dazzling. Fast, brilliant, exciting as possible. The audience roared its approval.
I hope they're not planning on recording this because it's just not ready. It will be interesting to compare it with MTT and San Francisco coming up in June, and then with Maazel in NY the same month.
post #2814 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
Just got back from a weeklong trip to southern CA. Need to report on the LA Philharmonic performance of the Mahler 7th. They were recording it for iTunes. No way is the Sunday matinee going that way. Principal trumpet made a major screw up in the first movement entering at one point a couple of bars early. The tenor horn was, for once, played on real European style rotary valve tenor horn, and not a euphonium that everyone else seems to use. And it made a large, noticable tonal difference.
Salonen is a fine conductor, but I'm not sure he's a natural Mahlerian. The 2nd movement was fine -- quicker than normal. The third was not spooky, not dramatic, almost too pleasant. The fourth movement was very nice. Very fine balancing of guitar and mandolin. The finale followed segue with a riotous timpani playing fff, not the single f in the score -- really exciting. The finale was a marvel of orchestral execution. But, alas, nearing the end, Salonen lost the momentum and the audience lost interest. It was getting turgid and dull. Then, Salonen woke up and the coda was dazzling. Fast, brilliant, exciting as possible. The audience roared its approval.
I hope they're not planning on recording this because it's just not ready. It will be interesting to compare it with MTT and San Francisco coming up in June, and then with Maazel in NY the same month.
Too bad about Salonen and the M7! I have a few of his Mahler recordings and they are not bad at all, even if they aren't in my top tier. It must have been a really off night for the orchestra. Maybe they are depressed that he is leaving at the end of the 2008 season for Europe.

Hearing Mahler live is always dicey. One would think that Eschenbach's name would guarantee an excellent evening based on his recordings, especially the M6 with the Philadelphia, but when they did the 4th it was good but not great, and the Wunderhorn song was close to a disaster because of Eschenbach's insistence on the singer, one of his "discoveries." (No one could hear her because the voice was just too small.) I was supposed to hear them do the Ruckertlieder on Tuesday, but Quasthoff had to withdraw because of illness. Instead we are getting some more Mozart. They are still doing the Bruckner 9th, so hopefully, it will still be a great evening.
post #2815 of 3690
Just got the Solti/Decca 8th, and really enjoy it... as with other Decca recordings in this series (Bruckner 4th, esp) it really shines.

This is my umpteenth attempt to "get in" to Mahler --- I must say I am having a difficult time focusing on the 8th long enough to grasp it the way I would like to.

--Chris
post #2816 of 3690
Umpteenth time? Yes, when I was younger, my mind often wandered listening to the long symphonies of Mahler & Bruckner. But not anymore -- except in the 8th! That 2nd movement is a tough slog in many recordings.

Have you tried the Mahler song cycles? They might be much easier to digest. Perhaps Songs of a Wayfarer?
post #2817 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
Yes, when I was younger, my mind often wandered listening to the long symphonies of Mahler & Bruckner.
No qualms with Bruckner, in fact he's my favorite composer (well, it's a tough call between him and Sibelius but only on account of the violin concerto, see my avatar for confirmation). I don't know what it is about Mahler that's different -- maybe the wandering is more psychotic whereas with Bruckner it's a tad more mellow.

Quote:
Have you tried the Mahler song cycles? They might be much easier to digest. Perhaps Songs of a Wayfarer?
I haven't. I will at next opportunity. Thanks.

--Chris
post #2818 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears View Post
Doc,

Glad to see that you have picked up this M2. I received mine weeks ago but was too busy to post my impressions (all favorable). Both mb and I have given it the "Sorry for your Wallet" seal of approval. Btw, the sound on this cd is probably among the best that I have heard for anything, especially in multichannel sound. The sacds coming out in this quality actually surpass the sound of vinyl, imo. There's no hiss or static or any other artifact that you get from vinyl, and it's as warm as you could wish. It's just pure, wonderful, musical sound.

Well, I've listened to the entire work now, and I would argue that, in terms of sonics, this is the best M2 I've ever heard. The performance is a bit idiosyncratic in terms of tempos and phrasing (which is a good thing for an owner of many M2s) and it will take me a few listenings to really form my opinion, but I can immedately attest that the sound is really something at which to marvel. I've never heard a more detailed, dynamic symphonic recording, and I've heard tens of thousands of them. This applies to both the two channel and multichannel layers, by the way. Can anyone doubt the capabilities of SACD after hearing this?
post #2819 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by hempcamp View Post
I don't know what it is about Mahler that's different -- maybe the wandering is more psychotic whereas with Bruckner it's a tad more mellow.


--Chris
Mahler was never psychotic. He could be very satirical and even enigmatic in his works whereas Bruckner was almost religious in his approach and always imo very straightforward as he built his "cathedrals of sound."

I tend to enjoy the irony and elliptical quotes Mahler puts into his work. There's an intellectual layer over the wonderful sound that he gets an orchestra to produce that requires a little more attention to decode. I also love the way he takes a melodic theme and turns it inside out and upside down, moving it from major to minor and back again. I love the way a particular motif will appear and then will disappear and then show up again later, like a flower sprouting up between cracks in the sidewalk.
post #2820 of 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
Just got back from a weeklong trip to southern CA. Need to report on the LA Philharmonic performance of the Mahler 7th. They were recording it for iTunes. No way is the Sunday matinee going that way. Principal trumpet made a major screw up in the first movement entering at one point a couple of bars early. The tenor horn was, for once, played on real European style rotary valve tenor horn, and not a euphonium that everyone else seems to use. And it made a large, noticable tonal difference.
Salonen is a fine conductor, but I'm not sure he's a natural Mahlerian. The 2nd movement was fine -- quicker than normal. The third was not spooky, not dramatic, almost too pleasant. The fourth movement was very nice. Very fine balancing of guitar and mandolin. The finale followed segue with a riotous timpani playing fff, not the single f in the score -- really exciting. The finale was a marvel of orchestral execution. But, alas, nearing the end, Salonen lost the momentum and the audience lost interest. It was getting turgid and dull. Then, Salonen woke up and the coda was dazzling. Fast, brilliant, exciting as possible. The audience roared its approval.
I hope they're not planning on recording this because it's just not ready. It will be interesting to compare it with MTT and San Francisco coming up in June, and then with Maazel in NY the same month.
Have to agree with you about Salonen's Mahler. Have his Mahler 3 recording with LA. Fantastic playing, but not exactly idiomatic. I haven't dared try his Bruckner. But anything 20th/21st century is great. And his own music is worth a listen.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings