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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 176

post #2626 of 3714
What's the concensus on the best Klemperer M2?

The one I have is: 1965 Live recording, EMI, Bavarian RSO.

I like it quite a bit.

-jar
post #2627 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar
What's the concensus on the best Klemperer M2?

The one I have is: 1965 Live recording, EMI, Bavarian RSO.

I like it quite a bit.

-jar
I am still a big fan of the GROTC version, but it's really the only Klemperer M2 I have heard. Concise and powerful...
post #2628 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder
I am still a big fan of the GROTC version, but it's really the only Klemperer M2 I have heard. Concise and powerful...
I see that original copies of the Live BRSO version are going for over $100 on Amazon. Interesting. Must be OOP.
post #2629 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar
I see that original copies of the Live BRSO version are going for over $100 on Amazon. Interesting. Must be OOP.
Ugh hate when things go out of print like that. You'd think it would show the record companies there is a demand for something.
post #2630 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar
I see that original copies of the Live BRSO version are going for over $100 on Amazon. Interesting. Must be OOP.
It can be had at Amazon/uk for a lot less than that.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B...sical&v=glance
post #2631 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar
What's the concensus on the best Klemperer M2?

The one I have is: 1965 Live recording, EMI, Bavarian RSO.

I like it quite a bit.

-jar
I have the live 1965 Klemperer/BRSO/EMI 2nd also with Janet Baker, listened to it a couple times several years ago but at the time never felt strongly that it was superior to the 1962 Kingsway Hall Klemperer/PO/EMI GROTC version with Schwarzkopf. The various comments left at Amazon feel strongly that the live 1965 version is better so maybe I will have to revisit these versions and make another assessment.

If I recall the sound improvement delivered by remaster for 1962 GROTC version kinda sealed the deal for me to prefer that, but will relisten with open mind and more experience under my belt.
post #2632 of 3714
I have the Yoel Levi/Atlanta Sym. 1st from Telarc, and unfortunately, it's my only set of Mahler. As far as quality goes, I don't find anything wrong with the telarc recordings.
post #2633 of 3714
That's because there is nothing wrong the those Telarc recordings. Excluding the Zander/Telarc recordings, you can make an extremely fine Mahler set on Telarc. There may be better individual recordings, but in terms of great sound, superb orchestral execution and generally excellent readings, it's hard to quibble. If these were the only Mahler recordings I owned, I would be content.

1. Levi (Much better than the Slatkin)
2. Levi (same, and one of better anywhere)
3. Lopez-Cobos turns out one of the very best, bettered only by Bernstein.
4. Levi - wonderful
5. Levi - powerful and very straightforward
6. Levi - I love this recording.
7. Levi - a real winner and too often overlooked.
8. Shaw - Not the best, but far from the worst. Shaw understood choirs.
9. Lopez-cobos - one of the best available.
10. Lopez-cobos - very fine, but uses Mazzeti's edition, not Cooke.

Surprisingly, even after 25 making cds, Telarc hasn't tackled a Das Lied. You also realize how good of a conductor Yoel Levi is, and what a shame it was that Atlanta dismissed him and no American orchestra picked him up.
post #2634 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub
That's because there is nothing wrong the those Telarc recordings. Excluding the Zander/Telarc recordings, you can make an extremely fine Mahler set on Telarc. There may be better individual recordings, but in terms of great sound, superb orchestral execution and generally excellent readings, it's hard to quibble. If these were the only Mahler recordings I owned, I would be content.

1. Levi (Much better than the Slatkin)
2. Levi (same, and one of better anywhere)
3. Lopez-Cobos turns out one of the very best, bettered only by Bernstein.
4. Levi - wonderful
5. Levi - powerful and very straightforward
6. Levi - I love this recording.
7. Levi - a real winner and too often overlooked.
8. Shaw - Not the best, but far from the worst. Shaw understood choirs.
9. Lopez-cobos - one of the best available.
10. Lopez-cobos - very fine, but uses Mazzeti's edition, not Cooke.

Surprisingly, even after 25 making cds, Telarc hasn't tackled a Das Lied. You also realize how good of a conductor Yoel Levi is, and what a shame it was that Atlanta dismissed him and no American orchestra picked him up.
Hey MB, do you dislike the Zander set? I have the whole cycle he's put out withthe Philharmonia on Telarc so far (still waiting for 2, 7, and 8 to come out) and I find it uniformly excellent, with great sonics. For me the weakest is 9 - ironically, I've heard it praised in glowing terms elsewhere, though.

Another great thing about his set are the discsussion discs - great for introducing someone new to each work.

I agree that the Lopez-cobos 9 is something special.
post #2635 of 3714
The reason I excluded the Zander set is that a good argument can be made that his are the better of the Telarc's available. The other non-Zander recordings can often be purchased very inexpensively, like from Berkshire. In general, I find the sound of the Levi, Lopez-Cobos recordings superior to the Zander's for some reason. Probably because the recording engineering team isn't the usual Telarc one. But still, the sound is overall very good. What I like most about the Zander recordings are his amazingly perceptive and thoughtful analysis of each symphony.
post #2636 of 3714
Yeah, I don't really have much experience yet with most of the Mahlers, except for the 1st. I really do enjoy spending the time to listen through the entire thing, esp. the 1st mov.! Audio bliss!
post #2637 of 3714
The Telarc mahlers that I have are Levi's 1st, 4th, 6th, 7th, and the Shaw 8th.
post #2638 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
I have the live 1965 Klemperer/BRSO/EMI 2nd also with Janet Baker, listened to it a couple times several years ago but at the time never felt strongly that it was superior to the 1962 Kingsway Hall Klemperer/PO/EMI GROTC version with Schwarzkopf. The various comments left at Amazon feel strongly that the live 1965 version is better so maybe I will have to revisit these versions and make another assessment.

If I recall the sound improvement delivered by remaster for 1962 GROTC version kinda sealed the deal for me to prefer that, but will relisten with open mind and more experience under my belt.
Listened to both of these Klemperer M2s again and still prefer the studio 1962 GROTC version..........not sure why so many at Amazon love the live version better????? Very similar style wise and timings are very close also, the sound quality for GROTC is much better so fail to see the attraction for live version.
post #2639 of 3714
I got lucky yesterday! I found a used copy of Daniele Gatti's M4 for pennies. Ofcourse, the case was literally in pieces, but the booklet was pristeen and the cd didn't appear to have even been touched. The last time I checked at Amazon, the recording was going for around $50 used, although I don't think it's available now. DA, contact me if this interests you.



When I have done some more listening I'll post my impressions.
post #2640 of 3714
After some search I was finally able to obtain (new from France) this OOP Dorian recording of Mahler 4 and Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen in chamber versions by Erwin Stein (1921) and Schoenberg (1920), played on period instruments by the Smithsonian Players et al. and conducted by Kenneth Slowik. The vocalists are Christine Brandes in the symphony and Susan Platts in the Lieder. No brass instruments to be heard in these reductions; rather the extremely idiocyncratic sounds from piano and harmonium. Beautiful limpid sounds from the quintet string section, too, of which four are Amati instruments in the Smithsonian collection. Slowik picked up quite a few interpretative ideas from Mengelberg's recording and personal score of the symphony, which is full of penciled-in marks and notes. So rubati and portamenti are plentiful and listening to them play Stein's very clever arrangement is fun to say the least. I don't have a HDCD decoder on my players but the CD sounds really fine already to these ears.

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