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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 153

post #2281 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by lolhahaha
So is there a SACD list?

I only buy SACD's at this point and I'd be interested but the list here is way too much. 100+ pages, lol.
Good idea, let's start one...

Here's all the Mahler SACD's I can think of off the top of my head. Everyone feel free to add to the list as you think of any.

M1:
Bernstein/NYP (Sony, stereo only)
Zander/Philharmonia (Telarc, multichannel)
Tilson Thomas/SFSO (SFSO Media, multichannel)
Abravanel/USO (Silverline, stereo only) (was Abravanel's whole cycle issued on SACD? I know it was on DVD-Audio)

M2:
Tilson Thomas/SFSO (SFSO Media, mch)
Kaplan/VPO (DG, mch)
Chailly/RCO (Decca, mch)
Slatkin/SLSO (Telarc, st)
Litton/DSO (Delos, mch)

M3:
Zander/Philharmonia (Telarc, mch)
Boulez/VPO (DG, mch)
Tilson Thomas/SFSO (SFSO Media, mch)
Chailly/RCO (Decca, mch)
Mehta/Bavarian St O (Farao, mch)

M4:
Tilson Thomas/SFSO (SFSO Media, mch)
Reiner/CSO (RCA, st)
Boulez/CO (DG, mch)

M5:
Zander/Philharmonia (Telarc, mch)
Abbado/BPO (DG, mch or st?)
Haenchen/Netherlands PO (Channel Classics, mch)
Limori/Wurttemberg PO (Ebs, mch)
Nott/Bamberg SO (Tudor, mch)
Temirkanov/SPPO (Water Lily Acoustics, mch) Anyone heard this???

M6:
Zander/Philharmonia (Telarc, mch)
Tilson Thomas/SFSO (SFSO Media, mch)
Oue/Osaka PO (Fontec, mch)
Abbado/BPO (DG, mch)
I. Fischer/BFO (Channel Classics, mch)

M7:
Tilson Thomas/SFSO (SFSO Media, mch)

M8:
Nagano/DSOB (Harmonia Mundi, mch)
Davis/Bavarian RSO (RCA, mch or st?)
Kubelik/Bavarian RSO (Audite, mch or st?)

Das Lied:
Boulez/VPO (DG,mch)

M9:
Tilson Thomas/SFSO (SFSO Media, mch)
Chailly/RCO (Decca, mch)

M10:
Szell/CO (Sony, st)

Contributions, corrections welcome!
post #2282 of 3714
This work has already been done! At the wonderful resource site of sa-cd.net, just type in Mahler in the search and you'll find all 59 titles currently available. This includes some non-US releases.

http://sa-cd.net/search/mahler/1/0/0/0

On closer inspection it is not quite 59 titles, because "Anna Netrebko - Sempre libera" turns up on the search because the Mahler Chamber Orchestra plays on it. And there is a title that isn't released yet. And there are a couple samplers included that shouldn't really count.
post #2283 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origen
This work has already been done! At the wonderful resource site of sa-cd.net, just type in Mahler in the search and you'll find all 59 titles currently available. This includes some non-US releases.

http://sa-cd.net/search/mahler/1/0/0/0

On closer inspection it is not quite 59 titles, because "Anna Netrebko - Sempre libera" turns up on the search because the Mahler Chamber Orchestra plays on it. And there is a title that isn't released yet. And there are a couple samplers included that shouldn't really count.
Some interesting stuff available only in Japan. I wonder if the Ashkenazy recordings are any good. I have heard him conduct Mahler's 1st, 3rd, and Das Lied live before. They were warm, straightforward performances. The first mvt of the third in Ashkenazy's hands was right up there with the best of them.

And why on earth is Mariss Jansons recording the Mahler 6 again with the Concertgebouw? He just recorded it a year or two ago with the London Symphony for their label. It was pretty good, although I thought it was kind of lightweight compared to the best.

M
post #2284 of 3714
I'd like to pick up No. 5, anyone care to make some recs on well a well recorded version?
post #2285 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakeride74
I'd like to pick up No. 5, anyone care to make some recs on well a well recorded version?
wakeride,

The best recorded 5th I've heard is the Decca recording with Riccardo Chailly conducting the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam. There are also really good recordings by Rudolf Barshai (on Brilliant) and Daniele Gatti (formerly on Conifer, now OOP) that are even better performances, though not quite as seductively recorded.
post #2286 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
And why on earth is Mariss Jansons recording the Mahler 6 again with the Concertgebouw? He just recorded it a year or two ago with the London Symphony for their label. It was pretty good, although I thought it was kind of lightweight compared to the best.

M
Because that's his new podium and he can. I have no doubt that RCO is not going to sound like any of the Mahler-lite ensembles.

I'm waiting for him to put more Shostakovich into their repetoire. I don't doubt that they are already rehearsing that.
post #2287 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
I have no doubt that RCO is not going to sound like any of the Mahler-lite ensembles.
Well, we'll see. That LSO performance didn't sound like Colin Davis' orchestra. It sounded like the Pittsburgh Symphony under Jansons, or the Oslo Philharmonic under Jansons. Which is to say, fine for many things, but lightweight for Mahler.
post #2288 of 3714
The orchestra sounded great for Haydn and Strauss when I heard them. The Heldenleben certainly isn't a light piece and the orchestra sound had a wonderful rich and plummy sound with really great bass notes, so I have my hopes up. Ofcourse, I am an optimist when it comes to things like this which is why I have so many cds that I rarely listen to.
post #2289 of 3714

Jansons' Mahler 6th

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
The orchestra sounded great for Haydn and Strauss when I heard them. The Heldenleben certainly isn't a light piece and the orchestra sound had a wonderful rich and plummy sound with really great bass notes, so I have my hopes up. Ofcourse, I am an optimist when it comes to things like this which is why I have so many cds that I rarely listen to.
The Jansons' Mahler 6 is out here in Switzerland and I picked it up over the week-end. The salesperson at the place where I buy my music is so nuts about Jansons that he already refers to the CD as the "reference" interpretation for the work.

What does it sound like? Well, I am not a distinguished Mahlerian like so many here, so I have few points of comparison. In fact my only other interpretation at hand is Bernstein's with the VPO. I find Jansons' interpretation less urgent and energic in the 'fast' movements -- the sound is leaner, more recessed, and the bass clearly less present. However, Anna's theme is absolutely beautiful, more moving than in Bernstein's rendering, and the orchestral colours in the finale seem to me more "natural". Still I find it a bit disturbing to feel so far from the orchestra -- I don't know if it is a common feature of RCO Live recordings, but I guess I would have preferred to be closer to the "action".

I will await with some interest the point of view of those who know their Mahler much better than I do.
post #2290 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
wakeride,

The best recorded 5th I've heard is the Decca recording with Riccardo Chailly conducting the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam. There are also really good recordings by Rudolf Barshai (on Brilliant) and Daniele Gatti (formerly on Conifer, now OOP) that are even better performances, though not quite as seductively recorded.
What do you think of Simon Rattle and Berlin Philharmonic?
post #2291 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakeride74
What do you think of Simon Rattle and Berlin Philharmonic?
I haven't heard it in its stereo incarnation. The surround sound DVD is pretty good, and it's not a bad performance. I need to go back and take another look at it some time.

Mark
post #2292 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ffodor
The Jansons' Mahler 6 is out here in Switzerland and I picked it up over the week-end. The salesperson at the place where I buy my music is so nuts about Jansons that he already refers to the CD as the "reference" interpretation for the work.

What does it sound like? Well, I am not a distinguished Mahlerian like so many here, so I have few points of comparison. In fact my only other interpretation at hand is Bernstein's with the VPO. I find Jansons' interpretation less urgent and energic in the 'fast' movements -- the sound is leaner, more recessed, and the bass clearly less present. However, Anna's theme is absolutely beautiful, more moving than in Bernstein's rendering, and the orchestral colours in the finale seem to me more "natural". Still I find it a bit disturbing to feel so far from the orchestra -- I don't know if it is a common feature of RCO Live recordings, but I guess I would have preferred to be closer to the "action".

I will await with some interest the point of view of those who know their Mahler much better than I do.
Try to get hold of Eiji Oué's recording of the M6.



There's no problem with the distance from the orchestra, bass or anything else about the sonics. It's also a very energetic, adrenaline driven performance and Alma's theme is also performed with tremendous intensity. The Andante from the symphony (3rd movement) is probably one of the best andante's ever done and the cowbells which sometimes seem jarringly out of place come across as a pastoral version of church bells -- heartbreakingly beautiful. Unfortunately it's only available in Japan, so you have to wend your way through the mysteries of Amazon Japan, which is quite an odyssey.

Another great 6th, which unfortunately is only in monophonic sound (but very good monophonic sound) is the Mitropoulos M6 which was recently released as part of the Great Conductors of the 20th Century series by EMI.



Btw, if the symphony was recorded in the Concertgebouw, then that may account for the weak bass. While the hall has famous accoustics, my experience there was that it was a bit dry and somewhat defeating to the bass notes.
post #2293 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Btw, if the symphony was recorded in the Concertgebouw, then that may account for the weak bass. While the hall has famous accoustics, my experience there was that it was a bit dry and somewhat defeating to the bass notes.
But then look at the rich sound (including bass) of the Chailly Mahler recordings done in the Concertgebouw, or at least most of them. This phenomenon of tricky acoustics in that hall has certainly been demonstrated by recordings over the years, though. Some have theorized that it changes with the weather, with air pressure and/or humidity altering the way the Concertgebouw responds to sound waves, just like the weather affects musical instruments, only on a huge scale.

FWIW, the most variable hall for Mahler listening that I've ever experienced is Chicago's Orchestra Hall. The seat where I heard Boulez's Mahler 9 was one of the least impressive seats (acoustically) I've ever had in a concert. The seat for Boulez's Mahler 2 was the best seat (acoustically) I've ever had. The two seats were only about 20 feet apart.

Mark
post #2294 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
FWIW, the most variable hall for Mahler listening that I've ever experienced is Chicago's Orchestra Hall. The seat where I heard Boulez's Mahler 9 was one of the least impressive seats (acoustically) I've ever had in a concert. The seat for Boulez's Mahler 2 was the best seat (acoustically) I've ever had. The two seats were only about 20 feet apart.

Mark
Orchestra Hall, even after the renovations, is a mess. When I saw Barenboim's Mahler 5, I had a really nice seat; however, that had more to do with the knowledge of one of my companions (a Chicago native) than anything else. In any event, hall acoustics are both infinitely complicated and very interesting for me.
post #2295 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
But then look at the rich sound (including bass) of the Chailly Mahler recordings done in the Concertgebouw, or at least most of them. This phenomenon of tricky acoustics in that hall has certainly been demonstrated by recordings over the years, though. Some have theorized that it changes with the weather, with air pressure and/or humidity altering the way the Concertgebouw responds to sound waves, just like the weather affects musical instruments, only on a huge scale.

FWIW, the most variable hall for Mahler listening that I've ever experienced is Chicago's Orchestra Hall. The seat where I heard Boulez's Mahler 9 was one of the least impressive seats (acoustically) I've ever had in a concert. The seat for Boulez's Mahler 2 was the best seat (acoustically) I've ever had. The two seats were only about 20 feet apart.

Mark
That's why a hall like Carnegie Hall (Stern) is so amazing. I've sat all over that place and I haven't found a bad place to hear the music. One of the best areas to hear the music is in the 2nd tier down close to the stage. The music is very slightly recessed, but so well balanced and warm! The most interesting thing about those seats is the way the applause sounds: it comes like a dull peal of thunder bouncing off the back of the auditorium like a mini explosion. Applause doesn't sound that way anywhere else in the auditorium.

Another really amazing hall is in the Troy Savings Bank (Troy, NY). That has been used as a recording venue for years and also as a recital hall. It's small with a "perfect" accoustic.

Edit: One of the more known recordings made in Troy is Ivan Moravec's recording of the Chopin Scherzos (Dorian). Patricia McClarty has also recorded the Bach suites for cello on viola there. Sonics are just amazing.
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