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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 152

post #2266 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origen
Yep.......that pretty much tells us all we need to know

As far as M8 & M10 I must plead ignorance since I have very few M8s and only have the Rattle M10.
For mid price 1CD version of M8 the Solti/Decca Legends is a real bargain and considered one of the best versions.
post #2267 of 3714
DA,

I have Solti's M8 already, which are LPs No. 99 and 100 in The Franklin Mint's "The 100 Greatest Recordings of All Time" series. I confess to not being able to get into M8, though. Maybe some year it'll hit me. I just tried again recently with Inbal's, but to no avail.
post #2268 of 3714
I suppose that I should jump in with my list, which has undergone some overall changes:

1. Kubelik/BRSO (DGG)
2. Slatkin/SLSO (Telarc)
3. Boulez/VPO (DGG)
4. Levine/CSO (RCA)
5. Barbirolli/Phil. (EMI)
6. Boulez/VPO (DGG)
7. Bertini/KRSO (EMI)
8. Nagano/DSOB (HM)
9. Ancerl/CPO (Superaphon)
Das Lied. Bernstein/VPO/King/Fischer-Dieskau (Decca)

I suppose that, on a personal level, I still like Boulez' interpretative style. However, that does not mean that he has the absolute best approach to each symphony.
post #2269 of 3714
And my list:
1) Kubelik (DG)
2) Blomstedt (London)
3) Levine (RCA)
4) Maazel (Sony)
5) Sinopoli (DG)
6) Barbirolli (EMI)
7) Kondrashin (Tahra)
8) Kubelik (DG)
9) Karajan (DG)
10) Morris (Philips)
Das Lied) Kletzki (EMI)

Best overall set: Kubelik

Still waiting to hear: Bertini
post #2270 of 3714
I would like to thank those that have contributed listings of their preferred recordings for individual symphonies after my request. The listing I have assembled does not represent an order of preference nor does it represent my absolute preferences for each symphony--rather it is a sketch of recordings I most commonly refer to.

Symphony no 1 in D major: Bernstein (Sony)
Symphony No 2 in C Minor: Klemperer (EMI)
Symphony no 3 in D minor: Bernstein (Sony) and/ or Solti (London/Decca)
Symphony no 4 in G major: Bernstein (Sony/ Deutsche Grammophon) and/or Szell (Sony)
Symphony no 5 in C sharp minor: Bernstein (Sony/Deutsche Grammophon) and/ or Kubelik (London/Decca/Audite) and/ or Kondrashin (Melodiya)
Symphony no 6 in A minor: Mitropoulos (EMI)
Symphony no 7 in E minor: Kondrashin (Melodiya) and/ or Bernstein (Sony) and/or Solti (London/Decca)
Symphony no 8 in E flat major: Bernstein (Sony) and/or Solti (London/Decca) and/ or Kubelik (London/Decca/Audite)
Symphony no 9 in D major: Chailly (London/ Decca)


Best,
iDesign
post #2271 of 3714
Thread Starter 
PS
Very diverse list you have there covering many styles of Mahler from the searing intensity of Ancerl M9, the elegance of Bertini M7, the clarity of Boulez, the flexibity of Kubelik M1......etc.
Only one that raises my eyebrow slightly is the Slatkin M2, hmmmm

MB
Have to hear that Levine M3 some day, great to see more support for Kondrashin M7 and Sinopoli M5. The Maazel M4 has never really worked for me, love the elegant silvery vocals of Kathleen Battle but the slow overall tempo used by Maazel just seems strange to me.

IDesign
That is great list so far and shares many of my favorites, the odd man out seems to be expansive style of Chailly M9.......different style than Bernstein/Sony, Kondrashin, Mitropoulos, Solti etc
post #2272 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
PS
Very diverse list you have there covering many styles of Mahler from the searing intensity of Ancerl M9, the elegance of Bertini M7, the clarity of Boulez, the flexibity of Kubelik M1......etc.
Only one that raises my eyebrow slightly is the Slatkin M2, hmmmm
From a live recording from the Vereinsaal, I think that the DG Boulez M2 will end up beating Slatkin; however, he provides the best balance so far. I was tortured deciding between Bernstein's DG disc, with its obvious visceral pleasure, and Slatkin's somewhat cooler record.

Critics seem to call Slatkin's style "measured," which is alright for me. He pays a lot of attention to the score, the tempi, and Mahler's overall phrasing. Does he have the majesty of Klemperer or Bernstein, the fire of Mehta or Barbirolli? No. He gives a cerebral account that works for me. I find it at least as elegant, though in a different way, as Bertini's recordings. In fact, I see Slatkin and Bertini as similar Mahler interpreters.

There are also some inherent problems with a regional band like the SLSO, compared to the Wiener Philharmoniker, but Slatkin seems to get them in sync with his concept.
post #2273 of 3714

Current Faves

Here's my list from a month ago, no revisions since then:

Forced myself to only one:

1. Zander
2. Kaplan VPO
3. Boulez
4. Abravanel
5. Kondrashin
6. Oue
7. Levine
8. Solti
DL: Klemperer
9. Ancerl
10. Rattle I guess (want to try Barshai)

I'm really looking forward to the Boulez M2, and the rest of the Zander set.
post #2274 of 3714
This thread is now very interesting as users continue to share their preferred recordings for each symphony. I hope that the thread continues to develop on this path as I believe it will help users make informed purchases and help steer readers of the thread towards recordings that suit their interests. It also allows one to identify which style of performances specific users prefer and will lead to better exchanges on the topic. Thank you to those who have already written on the topic and those who will continue to post comments/ lists.

In regards to the Mahler: Symphony No 9 Chailly recording, this has been my preferred recording for the work and subsequently the symphony that I have most heavily searched for recordings. The most recent individual recordings of this work that I have obtained have been increasingly disappointing.


Best,
iDesign
post #2275 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origen
Mark from HFR,

That's a lotta Jascha. A pity that no recording of his M5 is available. Did he record the Adagio of M10?
Origen,

An unidentified collector in NYC has the only known tape of a Horenstein Mahler 5th, from a concert with the Berlin Philharmonic in the 1950's. Horenstein's nephew Yakov Horenstein was unable to convince the collector to release the tape. In fact, all the collector would do was play a few minutes of the tape to Yakov over the telephone!

I am not aware of Jascha Horenstein ever performing the Adagio of M10, so not even any rumored recordings have surfaced there.

M
post #2276 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
Interesting that you chose Bernstein/DG glacially paced M9 over his more potent, faster paced and dramatic early Sony M9........
DA,

Bernstein himself said that the tempo for the finale in his Columbia recording was what the producer talked him into doing. He wanted to take it much more slowly, as he did in concert, but the producer argued that for home listening, it wouldn't work. So Bernstein yielded to the pressure and compromised his vision. For all its extremeness, the later recording is an uncompromised vision, and that appeals to me.

Mark
post #2277 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Origen
Mark from HFR:

I see you have Fischer-Dieskau for "Wayfarer" but with Kubelik. How does my LP of F-D with Furtwangler/Philharmonia compare, in your opinion?

Also on this LP, side two, is Kindertotenlieder with F-D and Kempe/Berlin. How do you rate that compared to your pick of Thomas Hampson with Bernstein, that I have not heard. Tom would have to be one heck of a singer to beat Dietrich.

EDIT: I actually have the F-D "Wayfarer" with Kubelik but haven't listened to it yet!!! I am a good couple of hundred LPs behind in my listening. It is part of a Franklin Mint 5-LP set from "The Great Conductors Collection." I just noticed in the liner notes that the Kubelik recording features a more mature F-D with "deeper understanding of the text," being recorded in May 1963 instead of June 1952 (the date of the Furtwangler recording).
Origen,

Well, I only heard the DFD/Furtwangler once, at a friend's house. As I recall it, it was excellent, too. There's probably a little tradeoff between the two recordings. With Kubelik, he's a little more experienced and wise. But with Furtwangler, his voice was in its first, most handsome bloom, plus there's the attraction of hearing Furtwangler conduct Mahler. I'll have to try to talk my friend into taping that off for me, including the other side of that record, which I haven't heard at all. DFD might well beat Tom Hampson, although Hampson is gravely effective. Frankly, I don't listen to the Kindertotenlieder very often, as great as they are, just because the subject matter creeps me out (and I don't even have any children!)

Mark
post #2278 of 3714
So is there a SACD list?

I only buy SACD's at this point and I'd be interested but the list here is way too much. 100+ pages, lol.
post #2279 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
DA,
Bernstein himself said that the tempo for the finale in his Columbia recording was what the producer talked him into doing. He wanted to take it much more slowly, as he did in concert, but the producer argued that for home listening, it wouldn't work. So Bernstein yielded to the pressure and compromised his vision. For all its extremeness, the later recording is an uncompromised vision, and that appeals to me.
Mark
Interesting background info.......but same producer must have influenced every performance in Sony/NYPO set since they are all done with faster tempos compared with later DG versions, check these times:

Bernstein Sony vs DG versions

Sym 2) 84:47 vs 93:28
Sym 3) 99:47 vs 105:48
Sym 5) 69:22 vs 75:03
Sym 6) 77:55 vs 84:47
Sym 9) 79:51 vs 89:11

Bernsteins timings for Sony are much more in line with tempos of other conductors playing Mahler in 1960s, and we have commented many times here how newer Mahler performances are much slower now in general than past recorded performaces. The 90 minute M9 is common now and faster older performances like Ancerl M9, Barbirolli M9, Kondrashin M9, Mitropoulos M9, Walter (1938) M9, Kubelik M9 etc are distant memories.
post #2280 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
Interesting background info.......but same producer must have influenced every performance in Sony/NYPO set since they are all done with faster tempos compared with later DG versions, check these times:

Bernstein Sony vs DG versions

Sym 2) 84:47 vs 93:28
Sym 3) 99:47 vs 105:48
Sym 5) 69:22 vs 75:03
Sym 6) 77:55 vs 84:47
Sym 9) 79:51 vs 89:11

Bernsteins timings for Sony are much more in line with tempos of other conductors playing Mahler in 1960s, and we have commented many times here how newer Mahler performances are much slower now in general than past recorded performaces. The 90 minute M9 is common now and faster older performances like Ancerl M9, Barbirolli M9, Kondrashin M9, Mitropoulos M9, Walter (1938) M9, Kubelik M9 etc are distant memories.
I think the overall trend toward slower tempi comes from a combination of factors. One, tempi always get slower as works are replayed and reexamined for meaning. Two, Bernstein was the most influential Mahler conductor of the period, and as his vision became more broadly epic, other conductors-- consciously or not-- echoed it. Three, those searching for a greater understanding of Mahler's music couldn't help but notice how often the old-school conductors abused Mahler's scores. As engaging as the above listed performances of the M9 are, they don't seem to heed all the markings of Mahler's score. Bernstein was one of the first conductors (along with Jascha Horenstein) to really attempt to shape the performance according to Mahler's tempo markings in the score, and I don't think it is a coincidence that those who did that found that they needed more room (both Bernstein and Horenstein were slower than the average speeds of their day). Of course, Bernstein's later vision gets ever broader and broader. One can't lay too much of that at any producer's feet. I think that's just Bernstein going for the glory and heightening the reality ever further. A lot of the cycle is very extreme, certainly beyond the pale for frequent listening, but it is certainly good for special occasion listening. And anyways, the M9 is an extreme piece, so I like a performance that pushes it to the brink one way or another, either very urgently fast, or very plangently slow.

Mark
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