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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 143

post #2131 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
They may not be available, but they are certainly obtainable. It's easy enough to obtain the titles that are not released in the USA by ordering from amazon uk, or other vendors located abroad.
Yeah but then there is the shipping....and the waiting!
post #2132 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder
I've listened to this a few times, not sure if I'll get used the tenor/barritone, but a wonderful recording none the less.

Scott
I agree, it can be a little weird, but Fischer-Dieskau had enough lieder experience that he offered as much sensitivity as possible. He hadn't quite developed the rather unpleasant "hectoring" quality that marred his later output. In any event, to catch James King in his prime (this was right around his Bayreuth Der Ring des Nibelungen recording on Philips) in this repertoire is something. Perhaps a lyric tenor (e.g., Peter Schreier) would have been a good choice, but a Heldentenor really brings a unique feel to the material.

I am not a big Bernstein fan, and I am certainly not devoted to his Mahler, but his approach - as I said earlier - really suits this music. One should not be too reserved at all in material like Das Lied von der Erde. I think, also, that the Wiener Philharmoniker adds a lot to this disc. While they had a troubled relationship and tend to glorify the connection, they were Mahler's band for a while. The recording is also as good as one could ask for, given its age. I really do think that this disc is one where all the elements came together in the right way at the right time and produced something special.
post #2133 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
I agree, it can be a little weird, but Fischer-Dieskau had enough lieder experience that he offered as much sensitivity as possible. He hadn't quite developed the rather unpleasant "hectoring" quality that marred his later output. In any event, to catch James King in his prime (this was right around his Bayreuth Der Ring des Nibelungen recording on Philips) in this repertoire is something. Perhaps a lyric tenor (e.g., Peter Schreier) would have been a good choice, but a Heldentenor really brings a unique feel to the material.
I have seen many who dont like Fischer-Dieskau, but I don't have a problem with him (at least not here). I've heard James King on another recording of DLVDE as well. Quite good as well. Will assuredly be listening to this more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
I am not a big Bernstein fan, and I am certainly not devoted to his Mahler, but his approach - as I said earlier - really suits this music. One should not be too reserved at all in material like Das Lied von der Erde. I think, also, that the Wiener Philharmoniker adds a lot to this disc. While they had a troubled relationship and tend to glorify the connection, they were Mahler's band for a while. The recording is also as good as one could ask for, given its age. I really do think that this disc is one where all the elements came together in the right way at the right time and produced something special.
Like I said above, this is a keeper. It's nice to have along side the other DLVDE I have. It's a piece that has grown on me over time, and hope to learn more about.
post #2134 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
Perhaps a lyric tenor (e.g., Peter Schreier) would have been a good choice, but a Heldentenor really brings a unique feel to the material.
Based on my experiences hearing Das Lied live in concert, I'd have to say that a Heldentenor is the only kind of singer who would have even so much as a snowball's chance in hell of being heard above the orchestra in the first movement!
post #2135 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder
I have seen many who dont like Fischer-Dieskau, but I don't have a problem with him (at least not here). I've heard James King on another recording of DLVDE as well. Quite good as well. Will assuredly be listening to this more.
I think this was cut in 1966, which was somewhat before Fischer-Dieskau really developed the unpleasant characteristics in his voice about which his critics harp. However, there is still some stridency, which doesn't bother me in these songs.

If you're interested, Bernstein did another Das Lied von der Erde with Christa Ludwig and Rene Kollo and the Israel Philharmonic. I haven't read any overwhemingly positive comments about it, nor have I heard it. However, I know generally how Ludwig sounded and I am not a Kollo fan.

Not to get too long-winded, but Gary Bertini's Das Lied von der Erde is a pretty solid outing (though I wouldn't buy the new EMI solely for it). Ben Heppner is one of the better tenors working today, and he does a very good job. Marjana Lipovšek (who recently did a M3 with Zubin Mehta and the Bayerische Staatskapelle) is also very good. Despite having first-rate singers (as in all his Mahler with vocal work), the attraction with Bertini is the orchestral work.
post #2136 of 3714
Here' another Mahler 1 worth looking into:

From harmonia mundi & Praga comes Bruno Walter's piano four-hand arrangement. An awful lot of fun. I'd post a picture of the cover but I don't know how you do that. PRD/DSD 250 197- HM 83.
Add it to the already existing piano four-hand versions of 6 & 7. What fun!
post #2137 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub
Here' another Mahler 1 worth looking into:

From harmonia mundi & Praga comes Bruno Walter's piano four-hand arrangement. An awful lot of fun. I'd post a picture of the cover but I don't know how you do that. PRD/DSD 250 197- HM 83.
Add it to the already existing piano four-hand versions of 6 & 7. What fun!
Waah, I saw this at the store last weekend and didn't pick it up . It looked interesting, but I wasn't 100% sure about it...

How is it? Do you recommend it as a good addition to a collection?
post #2138 of 3714
Mb or BD,

Would you please post a link to the arrangement? I can't find it through any search that I've tried.
post #2139 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Mb or BD,

Would you please post a link to the arrangement? I can't find it through any search that I've tried.
I can't find it either. Now I really wish I'd picked it up at that store! Any luck with those images, Mb?
post #2140 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub
Here' another Mahler 1 worth looking into:

From harmonia mundi & Praga comes Bruno Walter's piano four-hand arrangement. An awful lot of fun. I'd post a picture of the cover but I don't know how you do that. PRD/DSD 250 197- HM 83.
Add it to the already existing piano four-hand versions of 6 & 7. What fun!
To post a picture, right click on the image and copy image location. Then, place the cursor in the message box where you want the picture located, click the icon above with the picture and paste the image location in the dialogue box when prompted. Don't "copy image" or nothing happens. Be sure to "copy image location."
post #2141 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Based on my experiences hearing Das Lied live in concert, I'd have to say that a Heldentenor is the only kind of singer who would have even so much as a snowball's chance in hell of being heard above the orchestra in the first movement!
I suppose I should say, "Fair enough." However, the tendency of many Heldentenors to slip into the "Bayreuth bark" lends me to suggest that a well-balanced recording should make use of the lyric tenor. James King avoided that problem for most of his career, but that's why he was one of the greats.
post #2142 of 3714
Order Oue M6 on the 5th from Amazon.co.jp, arrived today. That's not too bad!
post #2143 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub
It's a truly great performance, and truly bad sound. Such is the fate of recordings made in that awful Albert Hall. The audience noise is very present. Nonetheless, Stoki always was at his best in live performances, and that's what you get here. If you know his RCA recording you know what to expect. Very dramatic, powerful, exciting. And he doesn't tamper with the orchestration too much. This music was made for Stokowski.
I have the Stokowski/BBC Legends M2........very worthy

The sound/crowd noise is not too bad on this mono BBC Legends CD (I have heard worse) The performance is like a snowball rolling down mountain, starts a bit restrained but continues to gather momentum and by the end is a juggernaut cashing down on you......Stoki acheives some cataclysmic climaxes in later movements. Baker is very closely miked in Urlicht seems to be sitting in your lap, and section where off stage band is faintly heard in distance is also too closely miked, but overall a great version that has the vision and dramatic power to fully project the final apocalypse ending.

Some purists are also tweaked by some extra cymbal clashes Stokowski adds to very close of symphony to add extra punch........seems to work great for me. Solti/CSO still reigns supreme as most fully realizing this astounding work
post #2144 of 3714

Mahler-related documentary

A co-worker lent me a wonderful documentary yesterday, titled "We Want the Light." Here's a link (I hope it comes out, since I'm still learning my way around the forum interface):

Link to Amazon.com page for this product.
That page doesn't give much of a description, so here's the back of the box:

"This is a DVD about many things. It is about freedom and captivity, about emancipation, acculturation and assimilation; it is about the roles played by Moses and Felix Mendelssohn in the dream of fruitful, unproblematic integration of the Jews into German society after their liberation from the ghettos; it is about Richard Wagner, his essay 'Das Judentum in der Musik' (The Jews in Music) and his influence on the thinking of the Third Reich but, most of all, it is a DVD about how much music can mean to people, even in the direst of circumstances, or particularly in the direst circumstances.
The title, 'We Want the Light,' is taken from a poem by a 12-year-old girl, Eva Pickova, written in the Theresienstadt concentration camp. Her words provide both the title and the climax - in a setting for two choruses and orchestra by the American composer Franz Waxman, in his work 'The Song of Terezin.' The DVD also contains music by Mahler, Bach, Schoenberg, Bruch, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Wagner, Schubert, Bloch and Brahms."

This is s 2-disc set, with hours of interviews featuring musicians like Ashkenazy, Barenboim, Kissin, Mehta, Perlman, and Zukerman.

The Mahler parts include a brief discussion at the beginning of the documentary, explaining how Mahler changed the direction of German/Austrian music and seemed to predict the difficult times ahead. The first movement of the M9 is featured here. Later on, there's also an interview with a woman who had played in one of the concentration camp orchestras; this particular orchestra was conducted by Mahler's niece (I believe this was in Auschwitz).
Most of the composer-related discussion centers on Mendelssohn (whose parents had converted to Christianity) and Wagner (with an analysis of his political writings, and footage of the first Wagner concert in Israel).
The musical selections are conducted by Ashkenazy.

I'm going through it slowly, because there's just so much material in there, but so far I really recommend it.
post #2145 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
I have the Stokowski/BBC Legends M2........very worthy

The sound/crowd noise is not too bad on this mono BBC Legends CD (I have heard worse) The performance is like a snowball rolling down mountain, starts a bit restrained but continues to gather momentum and by the end is a juggernaut cashing down on you......Stoki acheives some cataclysmic climaxes in later movements. Baker is very closely miked in Urlicht seems to be sitting in your lap, and section where off stage band is faintly heard in distance is also too closely miked, but overall a great version that has the vision and dramatic power to fully project the final apocalypse ending.

Some purists are also tweaked by some extra cymbal clashes Stokowski adds to very close of symphony to add extra punch........seems to work great for me. Solti/CSO still reigns supreme as most fully realizing this astounding work
DA,

Surely you mean "apotheosis" rather than "apocalypse"? I can't think of the 2nd in apocalyptic terms with its message of faith and resurrection.

Bookdoctor,

Thanks for the link. It looks quite interesting.
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