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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 127

post #1891 of 3714
Bunnyears, thanks for the rec on Yoel Levi/Atlanta SO Symphony No. 6, I could not find a copy but listened to samples from it and compared it to others. Ordered a copy from Amazon. I liked No. 7 too but 6 is more of what I was looking for and the Yoel Levi/Atlanta SO was on the money! Thanks!
post #1892 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakeride74
Bunnyears, thanks for the rec on Yoel Levi/Atlanta SO Symphony No. 6, I could not find a copy but listened to samples from it and compared it to others. Ordered a copy from Amazon. I liked No. 7 too but 6 is more of what I was looking for and the Yoel Levi/Atlanta SO was on the money! Thanks!
You are very welcome.
post #1893 of 3714
Recently I've been comparing the MTT and the Chailly sets against each other. In almost every instance (with the possible exception of the 9th), I prefer the Chailly by a fair margin. While their general approach is similar (somewhat expansive and generally "romantic" as opposed to "modern"), Chailly actually sounds profound and deeply felt (justifiying the slower timings), while MTT comes off as more static and not really plumbing the depths. In fact, the more I listen to the MTT, the more disenchanted I become with it. And the more I listen to the Chailly, the more I enjoy and appreciate his approach, a considered, deeply romantic one. As often happens, over time I have come to feel my initial impressions were wrong (initially I really liked MTT and was pretty lukewarm about Chailly).
post #1894 of 3714
Tyson,

You should try to listen to Chailly's 9th in SACD if possible. It might just change your mind.
post #1895 of 3714
Bunnyears,

I remember exchanging a few posts with you regarding the Michael Tilson Thomas and Riccardo Chailly Mahler: symphony No. 9 recordings. In your view, has the Chailly SACD recording surpassed the MTT SACD recording?

Best,
iDesign
post #1896 of 3714
Imo it's a deeper reading of the score (and closer if all of the critics are to be believed). I find that MTT's tendency to buff things up seems to get in the way of the deepest sentiment. It's the Mahler of resignation* and I'm not resigned enough yet, I prefer to see (or hear as the case may be) some struggle against the inevitable.

My preferred Ninth is probably Karel Ancerl's on supraphon gold label. It is also a much faster performance as well. Chailly tends to stretch the tempos to the max, and although the reading is gripping and in phenomenal sound, it gets long. If the length doesn't bother you then the Chailly should be very satisfying. The MTT is also an excellent interpretation, but it just doesn't speak to me the same way.

I'm still looking for M9s that give me that extra emotional push. If I find another I'll post about it. I have one on the way from England that I'm told is quite fine. If it ever arrives...

*The first time I listened to the MTT 9th I was reminded of something I had read somewhere: After Mahler came home from the premiere performance of the M2, he took all of the bouquets of flowers he had received and arranged them around his bed imagining himself on a hero's funeral bier. MTT's 9th was like that for me -- someone imagining themselves on their deathbed while still in full health.
post #1897 of 3714
Bunny is right, after listening through the MTT again, I find that the very thing that really attracted me to it is now the thing that bothers me. Namely, at first I really liked the elegaic, meditative quality to the MTT. Now I find that it is too unvaried and leads to a feeling of somnambulism. Chailly has similar meditative qualities, but it is balanced by moments of passionate intensity, and the entire work comes off better.
post #1898 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
*The first time I listened to the MTT 9th I was reminded of something I had read somewhere: After Mahler came home from the premiere performance of the M2, he took all of the bouquets of flowers he had received and arranged them around his bed imagining himself on a hero's funeral bier. MTT's 9th was like that for me -- someone imagining themselves on their deathbed while still in full health.
A few years back, as I was sitting with my wife-to-be absorbing the beauty that was the final movement of the M10 played by the Cleveland Orchestra under Mark Wigglesworth, the main thought that was with me was of a man struggling to get onto paper this wonderful music that was singing in his mind before the grim reaper came to take him.. this was the sound of a soul that got down all it could, enough of the story, so to speak, so that the world could at least hear these fantastic colors. At the end, a quiet resignation, yes, I got it down, maybe not exactly how I wanted it, but enough that someone could pick up the pieces.. the final notes, a quiet smile, let death come, I've said all that I've needed to say.

Though there was also a sadness, that these were in fact, the final notes ever to come from Mahler's pen.. such a bittersweet moment, the most beautiful music I had ever heard, but also the final notes from one of the most amazing minds in music history.

-jar
post #1899 of 3714
Jar,

It's a far cry from imagining your funeral as a young man to pushing yourself to the limits of your energy to put down as much as you can of your last symphonic work before death. It's that struggle that I miss from MTT's M9.
post #1900 of 3714
Japanese site with Mahler CD run times

again with translation

-

upper level with Bruckner, etc. and translation

--

Well, there isn't much of a middle ground on Boulez... I found the above wondering what his 1973/4 recording of M2 timed in at. I thought he'd be one of the faster ones. Turns out it's 83' 16". Anyway his upcoming release of M2 will probably stir some curiosity...
DG Boulez M2 info

-

French site with info (no timings) on M2 recordings, "121 versions" 1924 to 2005
post #1901 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnFerrier
Japanese site with Mahler CD run times

again with translation

-

upper level with Bruckner, etc. and translation

--

Well, there isn't much of a middle ground on Boulez... I found the above wondering what his 1973/4 recording of M2 timed in at. I thought he'd be one of the faster ones. Turns out it's 83' 16". Anyway his upcoming release of M2 will probably stir some curiosity...
DG Boulez M2 info

-

French site with info (no timings) on M2 recordings, "121 versions" 1924 to 2005
I cannot wait until May. I have been expecting this recording since I first got into Boulez's Mahler.
post #1902 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
I cannot wait until May. I have been expecting this recording since I first got into Boulez's Mahler.
: )
post #1903 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Jar,

It's a far cry from imagining your funeral as a young man to pushing yourself to the limits of your energy to put down as much as you can of your last symphonic work before death. It's that struggle that I miss from MTT's M9.
I kind of miss the M9. I miss having the time to spend with it to really get inside the work. Having two kids (2 years old and 6) takes up a lot of my time. When I do get time to listen, it's for short periods of time. Not nearly enough time to do serious analysis and absorbing. I still feel like after all these years that I haven't found the perfect M9.. but hopefully someday I will.

-jar
post #1904 of 3714
So many things to reply to:

1) Yes, the timings I gave refer to the 7th. de La Grange offers no insight into Mahler's timing in 2nd.

2) I do respect Klemperer, and his Mahler 9th is wonderful -- especially when we know that neither he or Walter ever heard Mahler conduct it. And as I said, his middle three movements of 7 are good.

3) It its true that tempos have been getting slower and slower over the last 100 years. No question. Gilbert Kaplan was absolutely correct about this in his recording of the Adagietto of the 5th. The swiftest M2 I know of is Eugene Ormandy's Minneapolis one from 1935, but the tempos used were probably a requirement to fit on 78s -- I don't know for sure.

4) There is no commercial recording of Steinberg/Pittsburgh doing M7. But the live broadcast from early 70s was a revelation, and those prople who have one of the underground tapes love it. The PSO should release it someday. He's also the one who advised a very young Simon Rattle, who was going to conduct M7 in LA, "Es ist nicht fur Kinder!"

5) I don't know if there is or will ever be a perfect Mahler 9th, or any other Mahler symphony recording. Let's hope not. It's too much fun listening to so many interpretations. I have high hope for the upcoming LA performances.

6) There are no repeats to cut in either the 2nd or 7th. The only Mahler symphonies with repeat marks are the 1st and 6th. Some conductors used to take cuts in the symphonies, often for broadcast purposes, but no one today would dare do it.
post #1905 of 3714
Mb,

As there are no repeats to cut in the M2, then 79 minutes and change is probably the fastest time we are going to see, unless Zinman decides to do it. I don't know how he got his singers to sing so fast in Beethoven's 9th.

As for the M9, I still have not found an M9 I am completely satisfied with either, so I am perpetually on the hunt.
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