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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 120

post #1786 of 3714
ClassicsToday Bertini Review
post #1787 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by vcoheda
Here's my take on Mahler. This list has not been updated for some time and I have not heard recent recordings. I used to listen to Mahler a lot a few years ago, but now listen almost exclusively to opera.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/richpub/lis...147550-9354264
Definitely solid choices. Lots of great new stuff to consider, though. This list will give you lots of ideas if you are so inclined. My current affectation is for the new Zander Telarc series now underway.
post #1788 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Darkangel,

Do you like Horenstein's Mahler? Horenstein is the other conductor that most comes to my mind when I hear Bertini's recordings. I don't find Bertini to be quite as feisty as Horenstein, but his sense of strength and refined detail is similar.

Mark

(PS- I didn't think you'd keep the Sinopoli! )
The Horenstein 3 is the only one I have heard, and it is of course a classic.
post #1789 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
I see the old Bertini/EMI 1,2,3,4,5 partial Mahler symphony set is widely available used for a fraction of the set price at Amazon if someone wanted to only make smaller investment.

Bertini only has 7 CDs in entire Tower Records inventory currently.......and I had never heard of him previously, so no wonder his death was not noted in major classical press.
Actually his death was noted outside Gramophone. Bertini was born in Romania and emigrated to Israel in 1947. He was active in Israel, then worked for the Detroit SO in the 80s and was the director of the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra for many years. His last position was as the musical director of the Tokyo Metropolitan SO. His passing was noted in the Japanese Press, German press and the Israeli press. The fact that Gramophone ignored him is of a piece with how they do things. Certainly Tony Duggan at Music web is very familiar with his work.

Aside from the 5 symphony set, you can also find some of the symphonies at Japanese vendors. M8, 10 and Das Lied were recorded in Japan by Fontec so the sq is excellent; they are the same company that made the Oué Mahler 6 recording. They were then licensed by EMI in order to produce a full set. The question is not whether the set is worthy but whether it is to someone's taste. It's not knuckle biting Mahler but more restrained in feeling, well considered, superbly performed Mahler, and also excellently recorded and produced as well. With the exception of the error in the booklet, I can find nothing to criticize. However it is objectivist Mahler, perfect for anyone who admires Boulez, but I don't find it as cold as some Boulez interpretations can be, perhaps because the performances are overwhelmingly beautiful.

Here is a link to the Japanese recordings. I note that there is an sacd of the M8 and another recording of the the M6 (with the Tokyo MSO), and another M4 with the Kindertotenlieder available that I will be trying to obtain when my husband goes back to Japan.

I also note that there are some Mozart recordings including a requiem available at jpc as well.
post #1790 of 3714
I've been listening to the Bertini and it's really hard to find a weakness. The most amazing thing about the performances is the transparency that he gets from his orchestra. You can hear everything! It's just a set that grows and grows on you. If it stays in production it won't stay at these prices.
post #1791 of 3714
Opps
post #1792 of 3714
Coming February 21st:

Kletzki DLVDE and Symphony No 4 (Remastered)

post #1793 of 3714
Apparently Roger Norrington has also started a Mahler cycle with the Radio Synphonieorchester Stuttgart des SWR for Hänssler Classics. The recording includes the 2nd movement that Mahler deleted (Blumine). It's official release is Feb 2006 but it's already available at yourmusic.

post #1794 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder
Coming February 21st:

Kletzki DLVDE and Symphony No 4 (Remastered)

These are both superb. Kletzki was a fine, and vastly underrated conductor. The performances are much like what you could hear before Mahler became mainstream and overplayed. The are honest and beautiful. Still stand up to the best.
post #1795 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbhaub
These are both superb. Kletzki was a fine, and vastly underrated conductor. The performances are much like what you could hear before Mahler became mainstream and overplayed. The are honest and beautiful. Still stand up to the best.
Well worth a shot for the price.
post #1796 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
I've been listening to the Bertini and it's really hard to find a weakness. The most amazing thing about the performances is the transparency that he gets from his orchestra. You can hear everything! It's just a set that grows and grows on you. If it stays in production it won't stay at these prices.
OK the Bertini set is on the way, as well as Mehta/LAPO/London M3 to join his fine Decca Legends 2nd.

In the meantime going through my Solti/CSO/London set again, this set contains some truely great performances.......the 2nd is just staggering in its scope and power a reference, 3rd also much better than i had remembered. As I hear more and more different versions the Solti set only grows in stature and rises above the rest.

I think in all the posts here so far I am only one who recommends Solti's Mahler other than 8th, must give Sir Georg his due.
post #1797 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
I think in all the posts here so far I am only one who recommends Solti's Mahler other than 8th, must give Sir Georg his due.
Solti was instrumental (ha) in my early Mahler days. Many of my early experiences were were conducted by Solti.

Probably my favorite 1st is his 80's Chicago version.. something must have been right that day because it's still one of the best recordings in my collection.

I have not heard his 2nd, but it sounds like I need to check it out.

The first version of the 3rd symphony that I owned was not Bernstein, but Solti. A great double lp analog recording, not sure of the year. I believe he also did a digital recording of it as well. The Bernstein CBS version later became my favorite over the Solti, but not by much. Lenny just stretches things out a little bit more, but the Solti has great power, though he rushes past some of the details..

Don't know his 4th.

In the early days of getting to know the 5th symphony, the first two I got to know were the early Solti recording and the Sinopoli. They both have their merits, though I have to say it's been so long since I heard the early Solti recording, I can't comment on it much except that it's pretty fast. I have the newer Solti Live 5th, which I listened to recently and it's pretty good.. Solti seems to be a little more relaxed than in his earlier version.

As with the 3rd, my first recording of the 6th was Solti's analog version, also on vinyl. It's much faster than the next couple recordings I heard (Tennstedt, Sinopoli and Levine). Solti really keeps the energy high throughout the work and again glosses over some of the subtleties.. There's really not that much of a contrast between the 1st and 2nd movements in Solti's version, there really needs to be a major shift or the listener can get lost.

Haven't heard Solti's 7th.

The 8th, well it's been probably 10 years since I've listened to it, but it is one of the greatest analog recordings ever made.

Haven't heard his 9th.

Besides the 1st and 5th, I haven't heard much of his newer cycle.

-jar
post #1798 of 3714
Well everyone, saw Rattle ruin Mahler last night. What a travesty he is!!! How can anyone ruin the Mahler 4th? Well, play with tempo and dynamics so that every little bit of tension is drained, so that climaxes never materialize and you get boring, second rate Mahler. I don't know how he ever became as famous as he is. He should have been aborted by the music world before they gave birth to this changeling. To paraphrase Hurwitz, the evening was inexcusably second rate.
post #1799 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Well everyone, saw Rattle ruin Mahler last night. What a travesty he is!!! How can anyone ruin the Mahler 4th? Well, play with tempo and dynamics so that every little bit of tension is drained, so that climaxes never materialize and you get boring, second rate Mahler. I don't know how he ever became as famous as he is. He should have been aborted by the music world before they gave birth to this changeling. To paraphrase Hurwitz, the evening was inexcusably second rate.
Sad turn of events...............way back in 1986 when Rattle's M2 first appeared there was so much promise for new young mahler conductor to carry the torch, yet like Abbado and others he has lost his way over the years and lost touch with the essence of Mahler.........
post #1800 of 3714
DA,

You can't even imagine how sad the first piece of the program was! Noesis by Kyburth (young composer). It's title is an anagram of the word NOISES, and that is exactly what the piece is, an arrangement of noises by an orchestra. As well performed as it may of been (who can judge with work of that nature), it is a bitter pill for any audience to swallow. There was only the faintest scattering of applause -- and Rattle came out for a second bow! He must really enjoy bowing to people who are walking out, back to him and empty seats because he did it again after the Mahler. Btw, his wife is a mezzo and the timbre of her voice is really too dark for the song at the end of the symphony. It is a womanly voice conveying nothing childlike. I think it is only pure ego that drives this couple to take the stage together in this work. What can I say about a performance that has not a wrong note but still is completely flat? One movement does not a great performance make.
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