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Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 116

post #1726 of 3714
I know a quite a few people who like Haitinck's Mahler and his Shostakovitch as well. The world is big enough for everyone to find something to their own taste.
post #1727 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
I know a quite a few people who like Haitinck's Mahler and his Shostakovitch as well. The world is big enough for everyone to find something to their own taste.
Didn't have much in the way of expectations, maybe that was it.
post #1728 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
The Bertini set is a much more beautifully packaged set! Beautiful cardboard cd sleeves with a lovely sepia toned photo of the composer on them which shades into reddish brown as the cds progress from no. 1 to No. 11, which is a rich brick tone. I only wish they had spent as much thought on the breaks as they did on the package. The first cd has symphony no. 1 and the first movement of the 2nd on it so that Mahler's directions are followed! It is the most sensible way to do this and EMI is to be congratulated on that, although I imagine it was just by accident of timing. The rest of the breaks are not as felicitous. Here is the breakdown:

CD 1 M1, M2 I
CD 2 M2 II-V
CD 3 M3 I-IV
CD 4 M3 V-VI; M4 I-III
CD 5 M4 IV; M5
CD 6 M7
CD 7 M6 I-III
CD 8 M6 IV; M9 I-II
CD 9 M9 III-IV; M10 Adagio
CD 10 M8
CD 11 Das Lied von der Erde

I finally broke down and found the money to purchase the
Bertini box (the Gielen counterpart being twice as expensive).
Everything that meets the eye seems as good as Bunnyears
describes above until I open the booklet to its first page and
see that they print "symphony no. 1 in D minor"

Does nobody at EMI listen to and know a little about Mahler
anymore? Granted, it is an erratum in a fairly minor detail,
but for me it considerably dampens my whole
experience with the production, and I say a bit too soon, too.
There is a better looking Japanese Toshiba-EMI box of the same
Bertini integral that is in a sturdy slipcase (and costs nearly
twice as much), and I wonder whether eyesores of this or other
kinds can also be found in there

ps. I compared the Japanese and the international EMI versions
(both contain 11 discs) and the disc breaks appear to be the same.
post #1729 of 3714
I wouldn't let a minor detail like that discourage me. Illiteracy abounds in today's world, and the recording industry is no exception. The number of errors and mistakes on LPs and CDs is monumental. The first CD I ever bought 21 years ago was the Tchaikovsky 6th with Lorin Maazel conducting the Cleverland Symphony Orchestra.
I still have my EMI/Angel LPs of Barbirolli doing the Mahler 6th. The spine also lists Strauss' Metamorphosen, which is totally absent from the records. This is no new thing. And best of all is a Hyperion CD of a piano concerto by Busoni, it says so on the cd itself. Yet the music is clearly some baroque concerto grosso.
post #1730 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masolino
I finally broke down and found the money to purchase the
Bertini box (the Gielen counterpart being twice as expensive).
Everything that meets the eye seems as good as Bunnyears
describes above until I open the booklet to its first page and
see that they print "symphony no. 1 in D minor"
Well, at least they got close to the key. It would be really sloppy and egregious if they suggested that it was in A or something.
post #1731 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masolino
I finally broke down and found the money to purchase the
Bertini box (the Gielen counterpart being twice as expensive).
Everything that meets the eye seems as good as Bunnyears
describes above until I open the booklet to its first page and
see that they print "symphony no. 1 in D minor"

Does nobody at EMI listen to and know a little about Mahler
anymore? Granted, it is an erratum in a fairly minor detail,
but for me it considerably dampens my whole
experience with the production, and I say a bit too soon, too.
There is a better looking Japanese Toshiba-EMI box of the same
Bertini integral that is in a sturdy slipcase (and costs nearly
twice as much), and I wonder whether eyesores of this or other
kinds can also be found in there

ps. I compared the Japanese and the international EMI versions
(both contain 11 discs) and the disc breaks appear to be the same.
Hehe! Now you know why they call it a budget set. muahaha

I haven't even opened the book yet! I noted the breaks in the symphonies from the back covers. Well, I guess EMI saved their pennies with their proof reader.

More seriously, I can live with the error more easily than with the horrid, flimsy sheathes of the Gielen set, which I am sure will tear eventually and expose those very expensive cds to possible damage. The error is also forgiveable as the Bertini is half the price.

Now, as for the goodies inside the box: I've been listening to the symphonies and they are all performed extremely well with excellent sound quality. Bertini is certainly from the same school as Gielen and Boulez and perhaps even a trifle cooler in his approach, and I am very happy with the set. I doubt it will appeal to anyone who only likes a nailbiting, frenzied, hyper-emotional approach to Mahler, but I think Patrick in particular would enjoy this set.

I think I'll drop EMI a note about their mistake and ask if they can print up a new booklet with the correct information. Perhaps they will actually do something about it!

Btw, there was a wonderful set of the complete Beethoven Symphonies by George Szell that included the piano concertos by Leon Fleischer for sale at Amazon for a ridiculously low price before Christmas. That was at least better than "Leon Fleishmann" like the margarine which is something I saw in a review somewhere or other.

I guess it's a sign of the times that literacy is declining, or maybe the proofreaders just weren't Mahler fans or knowledgeable about music and didn't know the difference between D minor and D major.
post #1732 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Now, as for the goodies inside the box: I've been listening to the symphonies and they are all performed extremely well with excellent sound quality. Bertini is certainly from the same school as Gielen and Boulez and perhaps even a trifle cooler in his approach, and I am very happy with the set. I doubt it will appeal to anyone who only likes a nailbiting, frenzied, hyper-emotional approach to Mahler, but I think Patrick in particular would enjoy this set.
You know me too well.

I suppose that I do have a pronounced predilection for a cooler, more analytical Mahler. I guess that such a concept fits in with my rhetorical concept of Mahler and his works. I will have to check it out. Tragedy that it is to have more Mahler.

Also, Bertini's Das Lied on Musical Heritage seemed to go over better than the Boulez on DGG. Pierre's Das Lied makes me somewhat nervous about his 2nd and 8th.
post #1733 of 3714
Das Lied is included in the Bertini set, and although I haven't gotten around to sampling those cds, they are reputed to be excellent.
post #1734 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
You know me too well.

I suppose that I do have a pronounced predilection for a cooler, more analytical Mahler. I guess that such a concept fits in with my rhetorical concept of Mahler and his works. I will have to check it out. Tragedy that it is to have more Mahler.
Patrick,

You should hear some of the Sinopoli recordings, too. Analytical, yet in a philosophical way, not a clinical way. If Boulez is a surgeon and Bertini is a bone specialist, Sinopoli is the shrink.

Mark
post #1735 of 3714
Adding to Mark's analogy, Oué would be the method actor.
post #1736 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Patrick,

You should hear some of the Sinopoli recordings, too. Analytical, yet in a philosophical way, not a clinical way. If Boulez is a surgeon and Bertini is a bone specialist, Sinopoli is the shrink.

Mark
That is an excellent analogy.

I won't say that I don't enjoy emotional, wild Mahler. Bernstein's DGG M2 is one of my favorites. However, one must remember that I received my introduction to Mahler through Klemperer's M2. That granite edifice certainly inclined me to a certain reserve in my Mahler.

I will definitely check out Sinopoli.
post #1737 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSmith08
That is an excellent analogy.

I won't say that I don't enjoy emotional, wild Mahler. Bernstein's DGG M2 is one of my favorites. However, one must remember that I received my introduction to Mahler through Klemperer's M2. That granite edifice certainly inclined me to a certain reserve in my Mahler.

I will definitely check out Sinopoli.
It's not that Sinopoli isn't emotional. In his own way, he is very personal and very idiosyncratic in his approach. But it sure doesn't end up sounding anything like Bernstein. Bernstein is ardent, like a lover. Sinopoli is passionately obsessed, like a scholar. Klemp just is.

More Mahler conductor analogies:

Bernstein is a Lover
Zander is an Explorer
Kondrashin is a Fireman
post #1738 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
It's not that Sinopoli isn't emotional. In his own way, he is very personal and very idiosyncratic in his approach. But it sure doesn't end up sounding anything like Bernstein. Bernstein is ardent, like a lover. Sinopoli is passionately obsessed, like a scholar. Klemp just is.

More Mahler conductor analogies:

Bernstein is a Lover
Zander is an Explorer
Kondrashin is a Fireman
Solti is a Boxer.
Dohnanyi is an Engineer.
post #1739 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
It's not that Sinopoli isn't emotional. In his own way, he is very personal and very idiosyncratic in his approach. But it sure doesn't end up sounding anything like Bernstein. Bernstein is ardent, like a lover. Sinopoli is passionately obsessed, like a scholar. Klemp just is.

More Mahler conductor analogies:

Bernstein is a Lover
Zander is an Explorer
Kondrashin is a Fireman
No, Kondrashin is not the Fireman putting out the flames, he's the arsonist fanning them.
post #1740 of 3714
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel
Two more Mahler CDs just arrived:
Gielen/Hanssler M2
Gielen/hanssler M7

Still waiting for arrival of complete Sinopoli/DG and Kubelik/DG sets....

Also just listened to Levine/CSO/RCA M4 and was very impressed, has just made it into elite list above. Sound quality is very vivid and hyper detailed. Whoever first mentioned that CD good find!
Why do I even venture to that bastion of mis-information classics today?

The new Gielen M2 received the 10/10, the "perfect" perfomance! Far from perfect a very average and quickly forgotten affair, if not for great sound it would be listed for sale as we speak. A conservative performance devoid of any real passion, excitement, or real spiritual inspiration, the Mahler life force has been completely drained. A real let down since Gielen's M1 was actually very good vibrant performance, seems like a diffferent person was involved here.....

I find this similar to M2 versions by Levi/Telarc, Slatkin/Telarc, new MTT......I describe them as pretty faces with no soul, smooth polished facades of glossy superficial beauty......the debut work of amateur conductor Kaplan/Conifer easily surpasses these for instance. Hope the M7 is better

Reference M2 remains:
Bernstein/Sony + Solti/CSO/London + Rattle/EMI + Mehta/Decca Legends + Litton/Delos + Kaplan/Conifer
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