or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings - Page 69

post #1021 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson
What was rather disturbing was the Starbucks across the street, with their HUGE advertising signs dominating the entire end of the block.
T.M.I.!

Scott,

The Solti M8 is my favorite recording of that symphony. It really puts the Rattle in its place, which is not on the same level. Gramophon's exaggeratedly positive opinion seems a bit strange. Advance hype on the Nagano M8 has me very curious as well. I just hope the hype is not so exaggerated as with the Rattle.

Re: Gilbert Kaplan M2

I just got this one, but not in SACD. If it's good, I'll bet I get that one as well. Over the weekend I listened to the Klemperer, Walter and the Litton. I'm looking forward to this.

Re: M6
I also listened to the Yoel Levi/Atlanta M6 and it is growing on me. The hammer blows do have great percussive quality, for what it's worth and the opening really grabs me too. I still reserve judgement about this one but the more I listen, the more it appeals to me.

Listened again to the Mitropoulos which is also excellent, mono sound a bit thin though.

Re: M4
The nicest surprise was listening to the Reiner M4 again last night. The more I hear it, the more I love it. It's going to be released in July in SACD, and you know it will be flying from the store into my collection. I don't know if the Szell is as good, but if it is then it really must be something extraordinary.

DarkAngel,

YOU TEASE!!! I have the feeling that you are going to have us scrambling to locate rare cds, and we wil all be panting and moaning at the impossiblity.
post #1022 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Doc,

According to Telarc's media contact, they have no current plans to release the Zander Mahler 4th in SACD format, and that they will not be re-recording the Mahler 9th.

Mark
That's too bad that the Zander 4 isn't coming out on SACD. The sonics on 3, 5, and 6 are simply phenomenal. Telarc isn't backing away from the format, I hope - I doubt it because other new releases are coming out.

I really appreciate and enjoy Zander's commentary discs. It would be a good idea, sometime on the future, for them to release them all as an audiobook!

Does Zander plan on completing the series? I now have 9 (on CD, bought for 5 bucks!), 3, 5, and 6 (all SACD). Are any others in the series out now that include the commentary discs?
post #1023 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
T.M.I.!
Re: M4
The nicest surprise was listening to the Reiner M4 again last night. The more I hear it, the more I love it. It's going to be released in July in SACD, and you know it will be flying from the store into my collection. I don't know if the Szell is as good, but if it is then it really must be something extraordinary.
I like the Reiner a lot, so much so that I couldn't part with my vinyl copy, even when I had the chance, and even knowing that I'll pick up the SACD!

I know I sound like a broken record, but I also recommend Abravanel for M4. I think it's the highlight of his series. The singer (Netanya Devrath) has a certain childlike quality to her voice that is extremely effective, perhaps not as a first-listen, but certainly as a compliment to other versions. The recording dates from 1963, and was the first critical edition recording, I think. The Vanguard sonics (in the echo-chamber known as the Mormon tabernacle in Salt lake City) are unique and fascinating.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/...album_id=76945
post #1024 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
That's too bad that the Zander 4 isn't coming out on SACD. The sonics on 3, 5, and 6 are simply phenomenal. Telarc isn't backing away from the format, I hope - I doubt it because other new releases are coming out.

I really appreciate and enjoy Zander's commentary discs. It would be a good idea, sometime on the future, for them to release them all as an audiobook!

Does Zander plan on completing the series? I now have 9 (on CD, bought for 5 bucks!), 3, 5, and 6 (all SACD). Are any others in the series out now that include the commentary discs?
Doc,

They plan on completing the series, all of them with bonus commentary discs. It's funny, Zander had to fight hard to get them to include the commentary disc with the 9th, but they proved so popular that now Telarc wants him to do a commentary with every recording. There are also plans for a Beethoven cycle (5 and 7 out so far), but interestingly, the release of the 3rd was cancelled after Zander was dissatisfied with it. Telarc pointed out that they had invested a good chunk of change into recording it, so Zander paid them something like $10,000 for the tape, to insure that they wouldn't release it, because he thinks he can do better.

As for the M4, maybe after the cycle is complete, we'll see it in an SACD box set. I hope so, anyway.

Mark
post #1025 of 3714
Is he doing commentary on the Beethovens as well?

That's really cool - he could be the next Lenny!
post #1026 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Doc,

They plan on completing the series, all of them with bonus commentary discs. It's funny, Zander had to fight hard to get them to include the commentary disc with the 9th, but they proved so popular that now Telarc wants him to do a commentary with every recording. There are also plans for a Beethoven cycle (5 and 7 out so far), but interestingly, the release of the 3rd was cancelled after Zander was dissatisfied with it. Telarc pointed out that they had invested a good chunk of change into recording it, so Zander paid them something like $10,000 for the tape, to insure that they wouldn't release it, because he thinks he can do better.

As for the M4, maybe after the cycle is complete, we'll see it in an SACD box set. I hope so, anyway.

Mark
Hey Mark,

I checked out the Zander 3rd from the library and was able to listen to the first 10 minutes or so, at least through the trombone solo..

I definately noticed that it's very unlinear.. very episodic.. he kind of moves from part to part and has a little fun with each little section.. I noticed some very interesting dynamic and tempo choices that I don't remember hearing in either the Bernstein or Solti (the only two that I'm very familiar with.. I have the Salonen but never really connected with it). Anyway, sounds like it's going to be a fascinating recording to get to know. I guess one way to put it is that he stops the smell the roses along the way. I got the feeling that Zander treats the first 15 minutes or so of the first movement as a kind of full orchestra concerto.. there's so many solos and so many beautiful little parts to it.. really an amazing work when you think about it on a different level than you have in the past.. I can't wait to give the 3rd movement a close dedicated listen.

-jar
post #1027 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
I like the Reiner a lot, so much so that I couldn't part with my vinyl copy, even when I had the chance, and even knowing that I'll pick up the SACD!

I know I sound like a broken record, but I also recommend Abravanel for M4. I think it's the highlight of his series. The singer (Netanya Devrath) has a certain childlike quality to her voice that is extremely effective, perhaps not as a first-listen, but certainly as a compliment to other versions. The recording dates from 1963, and was the first critical edition recording, I think. The Vanguard sonics (in the echo-chamber known as the Mormon tabernacle in Salt lake City) are unique and fascinating.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/...album_id=76945
I have the Reiner in the JVC XRCD edition. From my comparisons of the the XRCDs and my vinyl (Tchaikovsky/ Heifetz violin concerto for one), the XRCD comes extremely close to approximating the vinyl because of all of the extra information included. I also have the SACDs which give amazing space around the recording and are usually wonderful.

I see where you are getting when you talk about the "child like quality" for the singer. That is the greatness of Lisa Della Casa's interpretation. There is a clear, almost hesitant quality to her singing that makes it seem childlike in the song movement. Add to that the effortless quality of her range -- she never has to exert herself to get those high notes! I'll have to find the Abravanel to compare.

I never really related to the 4th when I was younger. it just seemed too inconsequential to me after the monumentality of the first three. But as I have grown older, I find it more like a small perfect gem that glows in the sunlight.

Well, I am listening to the end of the kaplan M2 (DG). What a stunning work! I only hope that he devotes as much time and effort to any of the other symphonies so that we will all benefit from his journey. Ofcourse, this means that I have to find it on SACD (always open-wallet season at head-fi).

Talking about open-wallet season, all of this chat about the Zander symphonies has gotten me so curious. I guess I'm going to take the plunge with one of them. Which one would you all recommend?
post #1028 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar
Hey Mark,

I checked out the Zander 3rd from the library and was able to listen to the first 10 minutes or so, at least through the trombone solo..

I definately noticed that it's very unlinear.. very episodic.. he kind of moves from part to part and has a little fun with each little section.. I guess one way to put it is that he stops the smell the roses along the way.

-jar
Jar,

Zander doesn't just stop to smell the roses, he jumps off the path and romps through the underbrush! It works, though, because he always keeps track of where the path is and how to find his way back to it. It's a kind of performance brinksmanship, but I think he pulls it off. Zander's makes most other recordings now seem a little poker-faced to me in the first movement.

Mark
post #1029 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
Talking about open-wallet season, all of this chat about the Zander symphonies has gotten me so curious. I guess I'm going to take the plunge with one of them. Which one would you all recommend?
They are all really good, but my personal favorite so far is M6 on SACD.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/...album_id=55171
post #1030 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Jar,

Zander doesn't just stop to smell the roses, he jumps off the path and romps through the underbrush! It works, though, because he always keeps track of where the path is and how to find his way back to it. It's a kind of performance brinksmanship, but I think he pulls it off. Zander's makes most other recordings now seem a little poker-faced to me in the first movement.

Mark
I'm starting to become very curious how he will handle the 2nd. Who knows, it just might be that perfect performance I've been looking for! (I know I haven't found even a near-perfect 2nd yet.. I guess the closest would be the 70's Abaddo version, though the 70's Mehta is also nice.. I think I've worn out the Slatkin, I still really like his tempos, but I find myself getting bored with it the last couple times I've listened to it). But I do know there are a lot of other 2nd's I haven't heard yet..

-jar
post #1031 of 3714

Suggestions for Order of Approaching Mahler Symphonies

In the earliest days of this thread, one of the themes was, “How should a newbie approach Mahler?” In that spirit, let me offer the following order of succession (would love to hear comments/contrasting opinions):

If I were starting over, I’d get to know the symphonies one at a time, in this order:

Symphony # 1 – It’s highly accessible, and contains the germ of everything Mahler did musically. Mahler introduces the autobiographical hero that works his way through the entire canon. It throws the hero into the universe, like the opening of “Lord of the Flies”.

Symphony # 5 – I’d go here next. Still highly accessible, yet with incomprehensible depths (Leonard Bernstein was buried with a copy of the score, if that tells you anything). The theme to me is “depression redeemed by love”.

Symphony # 4 – Like a sorbet between courses, but with a complex flavor and texture. Introduces vocals into our succession.

Symphony # 2 – Full-on Mahler, incredibly emotional. Ultimately optimistic; Mahler reaching out for religious/mystical impulses. May well be your favorite – it’s one of mine.

Symphonies # 6 and 7 - I like listening to these two as a cohesive set. #6 introduces the reality of the hero’s approaching mortality (prior to this, death was a familiar concept, but in the abstract as it relates to the hero himself), # 7 seems to me to represent “getting on with life” after that realization. Number 7 sounds like Shostakovich to me; maybe it was an influence to him. Non-choral structure in both.

Symphony # 8, Das Lied von der Erde, Symphony # 9 – Again, they tell a single story to me. # 8 represents a late-in-life surge of western-style religiosity and thoughts of life after death, as well as a celebration of art itself; Das Lied places human existence in the ongoing cycle of nature and represents a flirtation with eastern religious thought, # 9 is where the hero accepts death, where Mahler flirts ever-so-briefly with atonality and gives us a flavor of what "might have been".

Symphony # 3 – The magnum opus – contains the whole of human experience as well as the whole of nature, God and the universe. Possibly the least accessible of the bunch, so I saved it for (almost) last. To truly understand this piece, I think you need fluency with the rest of the canon.

Symphony # 10 – I can’t really make this fit into the story, so I view it as an enjoyable curiosity. I see it as, how would the hero think if he discovered his terminal death sentence to be a misdiagnosis?

Thoughts???
post #1032 of 3714
I'm trying to remember the order which I encountered the symphonies of Mahler..

I think it went something like this:

1. (Bruno Walter)
2. (Kubelik DG tape, another early one was Maazel on CBS)
4. (My first one was the Reiner LP, but I don't recall which other ones I heard)
5 or 9 (Solti for the 5th, Tennstedt for the 9th, though my first 9th was Maazel)
3 or 6 (both were Solti 70's LP's)
8. (Tennstedt)
7. (Levine)
Das Lied (I don't recall which one I heard first)
10. (Rattle, though I did preview several at the library first)

I think.

Mark, I know you had Tennstedt's M9 and I remember you warned me against listening to it.. hehe. But I think I tried anyway, but I don't remember exactly when.

As far as order of approach for the newbie?

1.
2.
4.
5.
3.
6 or 9
7.
and the rest.

-jar
post #1033 of 3714
I always liked Abbado's '93 recording of the 5th with the Berliner in the Philharmonie. It is a solid (workmanlike is far too derogatory, but probably very fair) performance, and this Gramophone reviewer seems to like it quite a bit. I don't know if it's that good, but Abbado clearly had tamed Herbert von Karajan's Philharmonie by '93 and has a good grasp of the material. Also, it is very well recorded. I don't think it is as well-recorded as Kaplan's '03 2nd, but it isn't bad by a longshot. Reference recording? It is for me, but I am not the Mahlerite that others are.

Of course, it's worth noting that Rattle began his public tenure as the principal conductor of the Berliner with Mahler's 5th.
post #1034 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Sarvis
In the earliest days of this thread, one of the themes was, “How should a newbie approach Mahler?”
Thoughts???
Hrmm. I am not sure there's a better way for someone to go at the Mahler cycle than in the order they were written. I got hold of a copy of the 9th fairly early on (as Jar mentions above) but I surely didn't understand it until much later, after I had absorbed the earlier symphonies. Then again, I started on Mahler at the age of 12, so it definitely took some growth to stretch my brain around the later works. I think the order I got to know them in was 1-2-4-5-6-7-3-8-9-DL-10, which is remarkably close to the order written.
post #1035 of 3714
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masonjar

Mark, I know you had Tennstedt's M9 and I remember you warned me against listening to it.. hehe. But I think I tried anyway, but I don't remember exactly when.

-jar
Ja, I remember that. I'm still not sure I can deal with Tennstedt's approach to the work. It's perhaps a little easier for me to conceive of M9 in terms of the "raging against the dying of the light" approach of Bernstein or even, to a certain extent, Karajan's live recording (remember, the one I got as a graduation present from high school?! [Has any other kid ever wanted a Mahler 9th recording as a graduation present???]). Or, on the other hand, I can get into the warmth of a Barbirolli or Neumann. Tennstedt weirds me out because his approach in M9 is almost passive, resigned. I can see resignation for the final movement, but to start there at the very beginning of the work? I admire the performance in an abstract way, but it still doesn't quite click with me.

Mark
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Mahler Symphonies Favorite Recordings