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How to rip DVD soundtrack into FLAC or MP3?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Can I rip some DVD I have (James Taylor, Diana Krall, roy Orbison Black & White Night etc.) into FLAC or MP3?

I'm thinking of buying either a cd or DVD of Talking Heads' Stop Making Sense, and if I knew how to rip the DVD I'd just buy that... easy decision.
post #2 of 10
You need a special program to rip only the music from a DVD. I use DVD Audio Extractor. It works exactly as represented. Here is a link to the developer's website: DVD Audio Extractor -- Full featured DVD audio ripper for your easy use
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
thank you. I think I'll order the DVD version of Stop Making Sense, and then rip it to FLAC for portability.

Thanks.
post #4 of 10
thank auee too, that's cool
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by auee View Post
You need a special program to rip only the music from a DVD. I use DVD Audio Extractor. It works exactly as represented. Here is a link to the developer's website: DVD Audio Extractor -- Full featured DVD audio ripper for your easy use
That looks like a great program. Do you have any experience with using it to find the hi-resolution (96 or 192 Mhz) two-channel tracks? Sometimes those are "hidden" (if they exist at all on a particular concert DVD), and it would seem that those would be the only high-bitrate files worth converting to FLAC, as normally the audio files on a DVD would only be at 44.1 or 48 Mhz.

Edit: copied to a new thread after mistakenly reviving this one...
post #6 of 10

The thing this program needs is a freedb tagger type thing biggrin.gif

post #7 of 10

VLC works pretty well at extracting audio then converting to your choice of format. The tricky part is finding the right title to rip off the DVD.

 

Free and opensource

Videolan.org

post #8 of 10

Well, u can try this DVD Ripper which can Extract audio from DVD to FLAC, MP3, WMA, AAC, M4A and other audio formats with good quality. It works for me great
 

post #9 of 10

    Greetings

 

    I was wondering the same thing, which has led me to this thread. I should note first that both of the suggested software tools for this thing are payware. One offers a 30-day trial(gimped?), but maybe there's a freeware solution that does at least the essential things. Might be a good idea to look. I'd in fact be doing that, but I have a further, more important concern.

 

   I like albums, a collection of some discrete tunes. The softwares suggested both appear to do only a single large audio file from a disc. When I get things off Usenet, I'm confounded by how often good albums are posted, but only as one bigass file. Sure, sometimes I DO like to hear it all straight through, except when I don't. As seperate consecutive tunes, I can choose either way.

 

   So, what I'll add to the OP's question follows:

      How do I rip DVD soundtrack to Flac? What software have you used? Free- or payware? Is there a way, with the aforementioned software(s) or otherwise, to save portions of audio to separate .flac files?

 

   I'm sure that if one has music-editing software it may be easy enough to do. This assumes both owning the proper software and being skilled enough in it's use to use it and gain the expected results. Personally I don't have the time or desire to go through all that trouble. I'll just break it up in the process of ripping it, if possible, otherwise likely blow it off, fair waste of good time.

 

   I can't help thinking that there's likely been a good lot of others who've had the same desires, and found a simple solution. Google hasn't been helpful, sadly, but at least I did my due diligence before posting here. I'm listening, ever patient, and thanks for caring enough to read.

 

                                                                                Peace.

post #10 of 10
You can do it all with free software. That is free as in both freedom and gratis.

I run Debian and this is how I do it:

Use lsdvd to check the disc contents and identify which track number and audio track I want.

Use mplayer with -dumpstream and -dumpfile options to dump that track to a vob file on hard disk.

These kind of dumped vobs can have timestamp errors so I use mkvmerge to mux the vob into matroska container; doing so automatically corrects that issue and also gives me the option to discard any video, subtitle or extra unwanted audio track.

I now have a matroska file containing only the audio track I wanted. Sometimes this means I'm done.

The audio could be anything from mp2, Dolby 2.0, Dolby or DTS 5.1. Depending on what I want to use the audio for I might now downmix it to two channels and/or transcode the audio to mp3 or vorbis or m4a or similar. If it's two channel Dolby or mp2 I'll just leave it as is. If it's 5.1 and I intend to play it back on a two channel device I will downmix it using my own bash script which uses mplayer's -pan option to do a decent job of properly downmixing the low frequency, surround and front channels into a nice sounding two channel stereo track and also transcoding and normalising if I choose.

The same tools are available for Windows and Mac. There is also ffmpeg which can do everything except dump the files from DVD to hard disk.

There are several graphical apps which let you do all the same things without using a terminal or command line but I found most of the graphical apps I tried tend to be either hideously complex or so simplistic as to be useless. There are also lots of poor apps which try to scam you into buying software which is only a low quality interface to tools available from their original authors at no charge. I suspect that VLC might be the easiest way to go if you prefer a graphical tool or only do this task occasionally. There is a reasonable guide for DVD audio to mp3 at http://www.wikihow.com/Rip-DVD-Audio-to-MP3-Using-VLC-Media-Player

Remember the process is essentially simple:

Dump to hard disk the audio track (or dump audio+video then discard the stuff you don't want)
That might be all you need, but maybe you also want to:
downmix to 2 channels
transcode to mp3 or m4a or similar.

That all there is to it, so don't get persuaded you need some expensive or complex apps to do this. If you find yourself using a very difficult or complex interface or about to hand over money then stop and look elsewhere.
Edited by julian67 - 7/28/13 at 2:20pm
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