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What are the differences with studio vs. audiophile headphones?

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
I herd those 2 terms before and want to know the meaning of them if any.
I figure they mean the same thing.
post #2 of 41
I would say they are both meaningless ways to describe a pair of headphones.
post #3 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by troymadison View Post
I would say they are both meaningless ways to describe a pair of headphones.
I'd expect this to be true as they are often used as advertising 'buzz-words'.

But I think the intention of the use could be explained as:
the Studio model would be designed to represent the music as true-to-the-source as possible so as to allow for mixing without causing an additional influence on the sound (flat),
while the Audiophile model would be designed to make the music more of a compromise between the above and an "enjoyable" presentation (coloration to make it more 'fun' sounding . . . emphasized bass response, etc).
post #4 of 41
$$$$$$
post #5 of 41
I noticed the general trend that anytime I ever saw "studio" attached to a description of a pair of cans at a store, they were typically high impedence. Perhaps it's a way of dissuading people who don't know anything about audio (and thus unlikely to have an amp) from buying them? Dunno.
post #6 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeltaX5 View Post
I figure they mean the same thing.
Ultrasone ED9 = audiophile.
AKG K702 = studio monitors.
post #7 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by troymadison View Post
I would say they are both meaningless ways to describe a pair of headphones.
True. A better worded way of saying it is "What's the difference between studio monitors and consumer headphones?"

Studio monitors = flat flat response.
Consumer headphones = usually tweaked to whatever makret the headphone is intended for particularly with in-ears.
post #8 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acix View Post
Ultrasone ED9 = audiophile.
AKG K702 = studio monitors.
I'd like to point out that when you go to the akg website, the image you click on to get to the 'consumer' part of the website is a K701.

True studio headphones - headphones designed to be tools for studio techs - are typically a bit bass-shy by audiophile standards which allows the tech to hear more detail in the midrange without the BOOM BOOM getting in the way.

In theory, these are lines that are not quite parallel, and way up in each line they get closer and closer - until you get to the Stax 4070 which is an outstanding headphone for both studio techs and audiophiles.

But no, you are unlikely to see someone working a mixing board or whathaveyou wearing a K702.

K271, maybe.

K240-M, you betcha.
post #9 of 41
yeh. I don't quite get how the ed9's are audiophile and the k702 being studio use. I'd probably quite strongly disagree with both comments. Ericj's post though, in my opinion, does shed some light on the differences.
post #10 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericj View Post

K240-M, you betcha.
MB Quarts QP 250, more fun, more bass, Just more...

post #11 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acix View Post
MB Quarts QP 250, more fun, more bass, Just more...

QP 250s are mouth watering
post #12 of 41
Some manufacturers, like beyerdynamic, use "studio monitor" to indicate a higher headband clamping pressure (or "N" -- Newton -- value) than "consumer".

Also beyer offers a coiled cord on the studio monitor HOs, usually with 1/4", but a straight cord with 1/8" on consumer ... you can override these options, but the defaults give you an idea of what they mean.

Studio monitors are more often closed than open (not always), and often features earcups that swivel (so they can be packed flat), and a sturdy carrying case ... for the working recording engineer. (Like DJ phones, which allow swing-away so you can use one-ear only).

Agree with other posters who say: studio monitor HPs feature flat, bass-shy response, to allow the recording engineer to do his/her job.
post #13 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by roxxor View Post
I noticed the general trend that anytime I ever saw "studio" attached to a description of a pair of cans at a store, they were typically high impedence. Perhaps it's a way of dissuading people who don't know anything about audio (and thus unlikely to have an amp) from buying them? Dunno.
True. And also, the studio and DJ models look like they're made for rougher handling.
post #14 of 41
Studio monitor focuses on real sound reproduction. Midrange comes first, then treble, then bass. It has to be flat then the producer/mixer takes that and do whatever he wants with it. It doesn't color the sound. You have to have isolation so you only hear the sound coming from the studio monitors. Audiophile headphones in the other hand takes all that and emphasizes. They make it more fun rather than flat. It uses unnecessary higher grade materials. I own MDR-R10 and MDR-7506. I am a sound engineer.

**They have high impedance because they use a different professional equipment than your regular consumers. The equipments are used produces way more than your iPod.
post #15 of 41
Studio monitors are flater and less fun. Take for instance the HD280.
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