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Hearing Test

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Try this test:

Free Online Ear Training - Test Tone Downloads

The audiologist I saw only tested up to 8 khz. This is not enough to test the full hearing range. I am only good up to about 12 khz. The only thing I can hear above that is faint white noise. I can perceive a noise, but it's not a high pitched noise like it's supposed to be. This is not a good sign for me. This is very sobering, as my hearing was pretty darn good just over a month ago.
post #2 of 21
Keep in mind that tones you download from the internet depend on your speaker system reproducing the tones accurately. The only true test would be an audiologist's test equipment.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
I am listening through koss portapro headphones. I guess it depends on what you mean by "hear." I can "hear" something above 13khz, but it doesn't sound high pitched at all, and it's pretty faint.
post #4 of 21
This one is better imo
Hearing Test Products

Round the 16k-18k mark is where my hearing begins to get worse. I can't hear much below 40hz.
post #5 of 21
The only time i'd ever trust these test would be with a middle-tier Stax.

There isn't enough notable frequency response in your average dynamic headphone to hear the test tones from 20 to 20, let alone equally in all areas.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Planar_head View Post
The only time i'd ever trust these test would be with a middle-tier Stax.

There isn't enough notable frequency response in your average dynamic headphone to hear the test tones from 20 to 20, let alone equally in all areas.
Just out of interest, what do audiologists use for hearing tests?
post #7 of 21

Hearing test

Hi Guys,
Using a K701 I was able to hear 20 to 19K (I'm 43). There is a difference between hearing the actually frequency and sound artifacts above 15K. Using a cheaper pair of Philips, I was able to hear up to 15K.
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by fraseyboy View Post
Just out of interest, what do audiologists use for hearing tests?
Hmm, when I went to get my physical, they used something that looked like this, but it had a slider on the back to test up to 15k. I'm assuming that they make sure that nothing is boosted (i.e., Grado treble spikes) to prevent people from hearing a certain frequency because of more volume.

I'd expect hearing test headphones to be something like these Senns, or these other Senns.

There are some audiometers on Google, but they didn't give any particular, standard-backed specs. (Then again, I wasn't looking too hard)
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by NTOman View Post
Hi Guys,
Using a K701 I was able to hear 20 to 19K (I'm 43). There is a difference between hearing the actually frequency and sound artifacts above 15K. Using a cheaper pair of Philips, I was able to hear up to 15K.
Yeah I was hearing distortion and stuff on the really high ones with my ER6i's...
post #10 of 21
Having had a bunch of hearing tests recently, the use of these tests is really only to get a basic idea of your hearing, not a true analytical test.
For 'most' people anything over 10K is getting pretty hard to hear (i.e. very faint - even though the volume is the same at all frequencies) and my ears give up at 12K (probably less). My partner ears can stretch at 14K, but even then she says its very very faint.
Most folk over the age of 40 y. should be happy if they can register anything over 10K.

Of course, the test is designed to go up to 8K, because the human voice doesn't make much in the way of sound above that (only some annoying sibilance as it happens) and that is actually what they are testing for, and not the ability to hear your hi-fi!

My on-going illness has lead to my ears suddenly picking up frequencies about 12K and I really wish that hadn't, because now most of my music is ruined by xs sibilance that I have to now eq out.
post #11 of 21
Hmm, pretty whack. I could hear the 20hz easily in the test the OP posted but not on the one fraseyboy posted. BTW, it has got to do a lot with the headphones and other gear. Not to mention volume. I sucked REALLY heard the first time. Second time cranked the volume up a bit, and the results were quite good. I'm guessing closed phones will work better as well.
I seemed to have some problems with the 125 - 500 notes on frasey's test. Well, I didn't exactly score near the dot, are you supposed to hear around the given dot?
post #12 of 21
Will lack of sleep affect the test, i.e. taking the test at 9 am without having slept during the night? I did the real test as part of a project at my university, and I scored pretty average while all the other project members had much better results.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krelian View Post
Will lack of sleep affect the test, i.e. taking the test at 9 am without having slept during the night?
Definetely.
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
How old are you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigTony View Post
Having had a bunch of hearing tests recently, the use of these tests is really only to get a basic idea of your hearing, not a true analytical test.
For 'most' people anything over 10K is getting pretty hard to hear (i.e. very faint - even though the volume is the same at all frequencies) and my ears give up at 12K (probably less). My partner ears can stretch at 14K, but even then she says its very very faint.
Most folk over the age of 40 y. should be happy if they can register anything over 10K.

Of course, the test is designed to go up to 8K, because the human voice doesn't make much in the way of sound above that (only some annoying sibilance as it happens) and that is actually what they are testing for, and not the ability to hear your hi-fi!

My on-going illness has lead to my ears suddenly picking up frequencies about 12K and I really wish that hadn't, because now most of my music is ruined by xs sibilance that I have to now eq out.
post #15 of 21
20-20 both tests, I <3 my ears (may be pertinent to add im only a senior in highschool and avoid loud areas)

Dave
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