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Noob Stax research - Page 8

post #106 of 148
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by -=Germania=- View Post
Keith,

The Lambda's are great headphones. I really want to get a pair and these SR-5's make it that much more tempting....
I would stress getting a good source though. The Auzen card and the Marantz CDP with the normal lines seem to have a bit of noise to them (to my ears YMMV).

I would look into a good DAC or nice CDP to go with those Lambdas. Maybe Vinyl?
I am on the lookout for a new CDP as source, so I'll have to get some research going on that at some point. any suggestions are appreciated. and I have a decent Dual turntable that needs a new stylus and cart, which may be on my christmas list.. that should only cost about $75 bucks or so to get the 1 that fits. but all in time. gotta watch the bread right now (dont we all). thanks for the input!
post #107 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oublie View Post
I think that depends on how much your willing to spend to try out a stax system. Personally my first was a set of electrets which although uncomfortable to wear for long periods got me hooked - this was very cheap so there was no concern about ending up with something i don't like as i could easily resell them.
My first SR-Lambda/SRD-X came from Plaidplatypus for $230 and I can sell it for $300 today if I was willing to part with it, so I consider even $300 a good entry level price for something that 85% of head-fiers will like.

I bought a second SR-Lambda for my Son for $230 from Fitz without an energizer a few months later, and I found an SRD-X for under $100. An SRD-6 can be had for $30-40, and with a good speaker amp will beat an SRD-X for sound. This is not a lot of money for this high level of sound. And this level of sound if good enough that one could stop searching for better if they could simply pull the plug on head-fi and ignore all of us "enablers" that let them know it can be even better.

I have over $4000 invested in a maxed Woo GES and SR-007 Mk2, that is better than SR-Lambda from an SRD-7SB and NuForce Icon
post #108 of 148
Finally pulled the trigger on the Omegas, eh Larry? I'm excited to hear them.
post #109 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherwood View Post
Finally pulled the trigger on the Omegas, eh Larry? I'm excited to hear them.
Did I forget to mention that I'm charging admission now?
post #110 of 148
Thread Starter 
what is the difference between an srd-6, and srd-6sb? is one preferred? is there an advantage to one over the other?

Since I've decided to start a search for lambda normal bias, I was looking for amp recommendations. also, if for some reason, I find an affordable lambda signature, what pro bias amps would you guys recommend?
post #111 of 148
There's a pro version of the SRD-7 that you should look out for.
post #112 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherwood View Post
Finally pulled the trigger on the Omegas, eh Larry? I'm excited to hear them.
Nice! I am quite sure you wont regret it...
post #113 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post
what is the difference between an srd-6, and srd-6sb? is one preferred? is there an advantage to one over the other?
SB are short for Self Bias. Meaning that it take power from the speaker level signal, instead of mains, to add bias voltage for the 'phones.

Advantage/Disadvantage correspondingly.
post #114 of 148
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
SB are short for Self Bias. Meaning that it take power from the speaker level signal, instead of mains, to add bias voltage for the 'phones.

Advantage/Disadvantage correspondingly.
I'm sorry, I dont understand this. where is the speaker level signal taken from? where is the Main.

I understand that either you put an rca signal into the amp, or you basically run speaker wire from the speaker output to the amp. is that what your talking about?

the term self bias is confusing. that implies that you can use any bias phones, and the amp will adjust on its own. I know that isnt the case, but It doesnt make sense why one would choose this SB design over a regular srd 6 or 7.

sorry to sound dense, but this is the noob research thread. LOL.
post #115 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post
I'm sorry, I dont understand this. where is the speaker level signal taken from? where is the Main.
Ok, let me explain more...

The SRD-6 and SRD-6SB (like the SRD-7 variants) are energizers, not amplifiers. Meaning that you need a regular speaker amplifier to drive them. They will not accept signal level (RCA).
* The SRD-6 hook up to a speaker amplifier (speaker level signal), and plug into the wall (110v, 230v, .. mains power). The bias are drawn from the mains
* The SRD-6SB hook up to a speaker amplifier (speaker level signal) only. The bias are drawn (or rather converted) from the speaker level signal.

The benefit of using an SB unit are that it can be completely off the grid. Or even portable if you want..
post #116 of 148
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
Ok, let me explain more...

The SRD-6 and SRD-6SB (like the SRD-7 variants) are energizers, not amplifiers. Meaning that you need a regular speaker amplifier to drive them. They will not accept signal level (RCA).
* The SRD-6 hook up to a speaker amplifier (speaker level signal), and plug into the wall (110v, 230v, .. mains power). The bias are drawn from the mains
* The SRD-6SB hook up to a speaker amplifier (speaker level signal) only. The bias are drawn (or rather converted) from the speaker level signal.

The benefit of using an SB unit are that it can be completely off the grid. Or even portable if you want..
Got it, thank you krmathis. Now it makes sense to me. I knew that I was missing something.

is there a way to use a typical HP amp to power the stax? or does the amp have to have dedicated speaker out? I ask because I will get a HP amp for some dynamic phones at some point, and it would be nice to use it for both, if the amp is superior to my receiver, which it should be.

although, maybe once I've had stax, I'll never go back.
post #117 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post
Got it, thank you krmathis. Now it makes sense to me. I knew that I was missing something.
You're most welcome!
Its quite different from how you usually hook up headphones, so I understand how it can be a bit hard to understand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post
is there a way to use a typical HP amp to power the stax? or does the amp have to have dedicated speaker out?
You energizer need some signal strength on input, for then to be able to drive a Stax in the other end. How much is needed I really don't know.
It may, or may not work. Depending the amplifier used..
post #118 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post
is there a way to use a typical HP amp to power the stax? or does the amp have to have dedicated speaker out? I ask because I will get a HP amp for some dynamic phones at some point, and it would be nice to use it for both, if the amp is superior to my receiver, which it should be.

although, maybe once I've had stax, I'll never go back.

That, good sir, is nigh impossible without an EXTREMELY powerful headphone amp. Think whole watts. You're looking at thousands of dollars.

If that's the route you're interested in, you'd do better to get an integrated amplifier with a decent headphone out -- there are quite a few of them. It would drive your Stax energizer through the speaker outputs, and drive your dynamic headphones through the headphone out.

Some popular models around here are made by Travagans and Glow.
post #119 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherwood View Post
That, good sir, is nigh impossible without an EXTREMELY powerful headphone amp. Think whole watts. You're looking at thousands of dollars.

Well, hundreds anyway.

Stax transformer boxes need at least a few whole watts. Most of them seem to be rated for a maximum continuous power handling of 5 to 7 watts.

This means that only the more badass of solid-state headphone amps can be configured to do the job.

A maxed out M3 should be able to do the job - it will do 6 watts RMS into 8 ohms with a big enough power supply according to AMB. This can be built for $200-$350 depending on how frugal you are.

A B22 with a similar 3.5 amp or so power supply should also do a fine job, and will cost a lot more than an M3 because it's a lot more complex of a build.

Some people do drive their stax transformer boxes with a Super T-Amp, which works, but probably not as well as a good speaker amp.

On the whole i have to agree with Sherwood that the ideal low-cost solution is a vintage integrated amp, or perhaps a vintage power amp driven by your favorite headphone amp (used as a preamp)

The actual power requirements aren't very high. The SRD-X is literally a transformer box driven internally by a pair of car radio chip amps that aren't even heatsinked. It's powered by 8 C-cells. It works just fine, but a T-Amp + SRD probably sounds better.

Another suggestion - a JVC "executive" office/bedroom stereo. Or a more modern version of that sort of thing. I have a Philips MCD708 mini-system that drives an SRD-7 in a pretty ok fashion and includes a dvd player, am/fm tuner, and pretty reasonable speakers for under $100 all over ebay recently (mostly refurbished units). No headphone jack, though. I'm still investigating whether an external headphone pad hooked up to the speaker amp is likely to work well (can only safely be done on single-ended amps).
post #120 of 148
There are several dencent and affordable headphone amps with speaker outputs to feed an SRD-6 or 7. Travagans Red or Green, Nuforce Icon, Dated MP-5 to name a few. I'm using the first three mentioned and they do a great job.
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