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Frequency Test: How much can u hear? - Page 4

post #46 of 120
My sound card isn't good enough, it's fluctuating. My limit with the crappy sound card is 18kHz, but I'm sure if the signal was clearer I'd be able to hear at least up to 19 or 20kHz, since once 18 kicked in it was really, really loud. Plus, I'm only 15. I've got young ears.
post #47 of 120
um i can hear till 12, i was wondering shouldn't you be able to hear the voice?

But it got annoy as hell after 15k
post #48 of 120
I had my hearing tested recently and can still hear up to 21k-22k or so before it rolls off, and I'm 30. I wear hearing protection when using power tools, and I wear ear plugs at concerts (I have a set with nice flat "response".. they don't color the sound much, just make it quieter). When I was 14 I was tested up to 25k. You can't even really hear that, but you can "feel" it.. actually, I perceived it mostly as a sort of altering of the noise floor that let me know sound was occurring rather than as a tone or note. It's (was) almost painful. I never thought it was all that great to hear up there, all that makes noise up that high is rodent repelling devices, automatic door sensors, some fluorescent lights, bug zappers, and the oscillators in analog televisions. Even in music, a lot of it is just squeeks from fingers on strings or feedback. No one has ever wanted to listen to a song centered at 20kHz so I don't think anyone should be too bummed if they are in the 18Khz range or so. Also remember a lot of sound cards have low pass filters taking off everything above 20kHz, to keep them from amplifying the noise of the computer itself.
post #49 of 120
i can definitely hear in the supper sonic range (frequencies greater then 20khz) but im not sure of what the highest frequency I find audiable is, for my computer has a crap soundcard. I am also only 17 so I guess that hearing sounds at these frequencies is nothing abnormal.
post #50 of 120
i can still hear the 19 to 20k iam only 21 but i work in an engine room on ship 8 hour a day 6 month of the year with earmuff but iam lucky to still hear that High especialy that an engine room is 100 to 130 db and the earmuff only remove like 30 to 35 db from that and for extra protection i use earplug under the muff thar bring the insulation to 40 to 45 but still pretty loud place.

But still no music sound better then a 15 000 horsepower diesel
post #51 of 120
A standard test file should not be able to recreate a sound over 22.05khz. The test file posted is at a higher sample rate, so most cheap sound cards will just reclock it to 44.1khz, or 22.05khz per chanel. Even then, the sounds at the upper thousand hertz are cut off to keep from playing the system noise.
post #52 of 120
much better
Equal loudness contours and audiometry - Test your own hearing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nocturnal310 View Post
Audio Signals and Test Tones. Playable online, free download. Tests your audio equipment, loudspeakers, room acoustics and hearing.




Hover your mouse over the circular icon .. the voice will tell u which frequency is being played.


Post the results of Highest Frequency u can hear.

i can hear 17khz max
post #53 of 120
Somewhere over on Hydrogenaudio Forums there's a frequency hearing test poll. Instead of just sinewave tones it has you ABX a music sample that's been lowpass filtered at various frequencies against the original.
post #54 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kicksonrt66 View Post
Somewhere over on Hydrogenaudio Forums there's a frequency hearing test poll. Instead of just sinewave tones it has you ABX a music sample that's been lowpass filtered at various frequencies against the original.
Interesting but not quite the same thing. You can frequently lowpass music that has a lot of high freqency components and not notice the difference until the filter is set remarkably low, this does not mean you cannot hear those frequencies.

Take a short music sample and run it through a spectrum analyser and you find that there is normally a slope or curve from low to high, when you get to 17 or 18K the intensity can be 40db or 50db down.
post #55 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by pichonCalavera View Post
Here are my results:



I guess I can hear better with my right ear than my left ear
i thought i had this problem too, expect i heard better with my left. then i flipped my headphones on backwards and i could hear better with the other ear.

stupid headphones!
post #56 of 120
I tried the test on the first side. 19k (but, I'm quite young.. 19).
post #57 of 120
Using my FreQ Show custom IEMs and iBasso D2 Viper, I can hear the late 18,000hz region at low volumes. 1 second after he says "19k".

With normal moderate listening volumes, I can hear it once he says "20k".

IEMs probably aren't the best for testing this since they drop off dramatically at around 16khz.
post #58 of 120
I can hear it just after a little while he says "20k"., but it is not clear at 17K.
I use the K271 mk2 directly connecting to my cheap sound card 3.5mm jacket.
post #59 of 120
I remember testing myself with audacity, I could just hear 23k. I guess I have young ears on my side though.
post #60 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by powertoold View Post
Using my FreQ Show custom IEMs and iBasso D2 Viper, I can hear the late 18,000hz region at low volumes. 1 second after he says "19k".

With normal moderate listening volumes, I can hear it once he says "20k".

IEMs probably aren't the best for testing this since they drop off dramatically at around 16khz.
Funny you should mention iems, through my hifi i can hear 17k no problem yet running it through the s9 with my use super fi 5's i can't hear anything until 15k, i have dialled down some high end harshness, maybe the better the source the easier it is to hear higher up?

Still im surprised it didn't go above 15k.
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