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Frequency Test: How much can u hear? - Page 3

post #31 of 120
It is strange, it seem like sometimes I can even hear up to 22KHZ !

So
Does anyone hear have a test that can get up to 23 or 24 khz ?
post #32 of 120
I can hear up to and including 21 KHz if the volume is fairly loud.
post #33 of 120

Response to Head Lover

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeadLover View Post
It is strange, it seem like sometimes I can even hear up to 22KHZ !

So
Does anyone hear have a test that can get up to 23 or 24 khz ?
The tone generator on Audacity goes up to 28 KHz at least. I've never tried to go beyond that.
post #34 of 120
Here are my results:



I guess I can hear better with my right ear than my left ear
post #35 of 120
Thread Starter 
well after watching F1 night race from 3 metres i think i cant even hear 17khz.
post #36 of 120
I can hear 20KH if i put the volume loud.
post #37 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pushifer View Post
I can hear 20KH if i put the volume loud.
Actually, somebody correct me if I'm mistaken, but you might be hearing harmonics that exist in a lower frequency when you try the test at higher volumes.. I'm pretty sure these kind of tests rely heavily on proper calibration.
post #38 of 120
I hear such a different but equally loud sound at 22kHz.
post #39 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zodduska View Post
Actually, somebody correct me if I'm mistaken, but you might be hearing harmonics that exist in a lower frequency when you try the test at higher volumes.. I'm pretty sure these kind of tests rely heavily on proper calibration.
Well, maybe. If you increase the frequency of the tone, and perceive the tone as doing the same thing, I'd say it's fairly unlikely that this is the case. A harmonic is going to be higher or lower in frequency than the actual signal, so you'll probably notice it. You are correct, though; in order for any test to be conclusive, proper calibration is essential.

Your hearing doesn't have a hard set maximum limit. You might be able to hear 16 kHz loud and clear, then notice it gets quieter and quieter as you increase the frequency, until you reach a point where you can't hear it anymore. If you can only hear 20 kHz after cranking the volume, your hearing probably starts to drop off at some point before that.

Also, remember the equipment you're using. If your speakers or headphones can't reproduce 22 kHz at the same volume as 16 kHz, your results will be skewed. Not to mention that the vast majority of headphones and speakers aren't going to have a perfectly flat frequency response, anyway. That's where the calibration comes in.

Regardless of all of this, it's still a fun and interesting test. The results need to be taken with a grain of salt, however.
post #40 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by uhcmos1 View Post
I hear such a different but equally loud sound at 22kHz.
That's probably the result of aliasing or harmonics.
post #41 of 120
yeah, you're supposed to do tests like these in a perfectly quiet room, so you can turn the source down to your hearing threshold.

Also, depending on your gear, you may not be able to hear some frequencies, either from roll off, or whatever. you know that some cans have spikes at high freqs. Also, are we adjusting for dBA or not? That might have an effect since the fletcher munson curve tells us our sound perception at high freqs gets pretty crappy anyways (it rolls right the hell off after 11kHz I think).

I remember the first time I listened to test tones like these, they were on my computer speakers and I thought "awesome, I can hear up past 20kHz just fine". It turns out my computer speakers were crap, and what I was hearing was some sort of distorted undertone or resonance; not a pure sin wave of 19kHz. Guys that are hearing some bands but not others - this might be an explanation...

I haven't tried to self test in a while, but on my KSC75 and my AD900, I can usually hear a little past 15kHz. I wonder if I might have different results if I set the EQ on my player to match an equal loudness curve of some sort? Or are my heapdhones already doing that on their own?
post #42 of 120
20k, = happy (although still... only 20 years old)
post #43 of 120
last i remembed 16khz. high frequencies at loud decibels is an excellent way to quickly lose your hearings and develop tinitis. I use my software eq to turn down the high frequencies because i'm too sensitive to them.
post #44 of 120
I start barely hearing the sound at 18khz, I'm 21 and wishing I'd protected my hearing more previously.
post #45 of 120
with my esw9 i can feel 19k
but only 18k with K240
to some extent it's about the frequency response about your system........
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