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Frequency Test: How much can u hear? - Page 2

post #16 of 120
Owie....that hurt my ears!
I can hear all of it, up to the 12k.
i'm 16.
post #17 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audio-Fi View Post

This test is better

Hearing Test Products
According to this test, I can easily hear 20Hz and 20 kHz but have some troubles hearing 250 to 750 Hz. I wonder why.. Maybe it's because the infamous midrange dip of D5000.
post #18 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalGeek View Post
For that test I fairly easily heard 22 kHz. I also tried the aliasing test, and my system passed. Testing myself with tones I generated with Audacity, I was able to hear up to 23 kHz, but nothing past that. At that point, I'm not sure if it's my ears or my equipment that's causing the roll-off. I'll just assume it's my ears.

Any sine wave above 15 kHz is brutal. Those are some really painful tones to listen to!!

BTW, aliasing works like this:

Let's say you have two sine waves: one at 2 kHz and the other at 4 kHz. The one at 4 kHz can sound exactly the same as the 2 kHz tone if aliasing is present. It's a bit hard to describe, but maybe this image will help.



Notice that there are two sine waves present, the red one and the blue one. Each have the exact same values where the dots are located. When you sample an analog signal to turn it into a digital signal, all you really are doing is taking several of these "dots" and using them to represent your original signal. Unfortunately, in doing this, two different signals can look identical. This is known as aliasing; one frequency appears exactly the same as another one. In this case, the blue sine wave is sampled correctly while the red one is sampled incorrectly. The red one will sound like the blue one.

The sampling rate for a CD is 44.1 kHz, which basically means that anything under 22.05 kHz will be sampled correctly, and anything above that will be aliased to another frequency below 22.05 kHz. This won't be a problem in audio recordings because anti-aliasing filters are used in order to basically attenuate anything above 22.05 kHz from the original signal.

If you heard a rising tone instead of a falling tone during the aliasing test, it means that your system is experiencing aliasing. For this test, a system that experiences aliasing will be representing higher frequencies as lower ones, and vice-versa.
Now that's a great answer! Thanks for clearing this out. So I need to do alias filtering...

It seems it works now... I resampled the file to 192 kHz and now I don't hear anything until 17 kHz.
post #19 of 120
17k, although my ears feel weird with 18 and 19k
post #20 of 120
As explainded in the link, you must first test your system for aliasing : Audio Signals and Test Tones. Playable online, free download. Tests your audio equipment, loudspeakers, room acoustics and hearing.

The results described by 4heckssake and audio-fi come from aliasing in their Browser / Plugin / Soundcard, and have nothing to do with their hearing ability.

I get no aliasing at 44.1 kHz, but I've got some at 48 kHz. This does not come from my soundcard, that doesn't alias, but from my Internet browser and the plugin used to play the sound.

There was no audible aliasing for me in the test. I could hear from 15 kHz and below (age 33, male).
post #21 of 120
Three years ago 21.5khz was the upper limit for my ears.

Today its 20khz exact!


I'm not sure what I've done in the last three years to lose 1.5khz of hearing ability...





EK
post #22 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by evilking View Post
Three years ago 21.5khz was the upper limit for my ears.

Today its 20khz exact!


I'm not sure what I've done in the last three years to lose 1.5khz of hearing ability...



EK
You grew older
post #23 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audio-Fi View Post
This test is better

Hearing Test Products
Now, that's a cool test !

I've performed it five times.
Two times with Superex Pro-B VI headphones (closed), aural calibration. results are 5 dB from each other.
One time with HD600 headphones, aural calibration. Differences with the previous are up to 25 dB.
One time with HD600 headphones, SLM calibration comparing the volume between speakers and headphones.
One time with Pro-B VI headphones, SLM calibration comparing the volume between speakers and headphones.

The funny thing is that with aural calibration, the Superex makes me more deaf than the Sennheiser, while it is the opposite with pseudo-SLM calibration.
LL
LL
post #24 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pio2001 View Post
I get no aliasing at 44.1 kHz, but I've got some at 48 kHz. This does not come from my soundcard, that doesn't alias, but from my Internet browser and the plugin used to play the sound.

There was no audible aliasing for me in the test. I could hear from 15 kHz and below (age 33, male).
Yeah, my system aliases when played through a browser, but when I save the samples and play in winamp or foobar, it has gone. (The media players are not upsampling)
post #25 of 120
Thread Starter 
Is there a way to fix this Aliasing caused in Browsers?
post #26 of 120
17k.....is that bad? as a 27yo
post #27 of 120
I am something like 21KHZ
So I guess I am fine
post #28 of 120
Same things happening to me.
22-18khz is distinct and easy to hear, but it disappears for half a second right in between 17 and 18khz.
D1001 straight through a laptop right now. .. I'm pretty certain I'm not 'supposed' to hear the 22khz signal.
post #29 of 120


Not too bad, I guess.
post #30 of 120
This is really ironic because I just asked this question in another thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by immtbiker
I wish the "Sweep left, 20 - 20.000 Hz -10 dB (677 KB)" ran with a visual graph so I can gauge at which tone I lose my ability to hear higher frequencies.

Anyone know of such a test from the internet?
Back in DOS 3.0 days, I had a program that would run a graph with exhibiting an audible climbing test tone and I lost it at 17k (which I'm told is the most humans can hear). This test became audible to me at 17k also, so I must be OK 20 years later.

You guys hearing over 20K must have been raised by wolves
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