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Frequency Test: How much can u hear? - Page 8

post #106 of 120
I can hear 21khz. So if people can't hear higher pitches, does that mean they shouldn't have audiophile headphones?
post #107 of 120
Yep. Unless you use your headphones for listening to music...
Becouse there won't be any "data" at those frequencies anyway. Also it's not about "how much your can can do" but how they do what they can ('scues the pun )
post #108 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quitoman View Post
I can hear 21khz. So if people can't hear higher pitches, does that mean they shouldn't have audiophile headphones?
No, because it is about the sound quality of the frequencies you can hear and not whether you can hear 21khz or not.
post #109 of 120
Dont know if this is good or bad but at least im not deaf

post #110 of 120
Better than I expected:

post #111 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkweg View Post
No, because it is about the sound quality of the frequencies you can hear and not whether you can hear 21khz or not.
Well then you get people saying the DT880 are neutral. Not way to bright, like they actually are IMO.
post #112 of 120
Theres something strange about this test. Apparently I have a huge hearing range of 14hz-22khz both outside of "human hearing". And i have relatively bad ears due to childbirth problems will try the other later
post #113 of 120
When I try the Aural calibration, I don't hear anything.
post #114 of 120
Hmm I was using sinegen and was able to hear the full range (15-22k Hz). I was wondering how accurate it was when I saw this thread. I was able to hear 22hz in the audio samples as well. My parents were always talking about how I have bad hearing; I guess it's just selective hearing
post #115 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkweg View Post
No, because it is about the sound quality of the frequencies you can hear and not whether you can hear 21khz or not.
What does that mean? What does sound quality of the frequency mean?

I am not trying to start an argument. I just want to understand the statement.
post #116 of 120
I think he means that just because you can hear 30kHz doesn't mean you can tell whether a flute apart from a violin or whether the sound is coming from the left or the right. Of course that's some vast exaggerations but it also applies to smaller things like guitar being out of tune, distortions, etc.
post #117 of 120
a Big word of WARNING.

Be very carefull with your equipment using test tones, especially high frequency which are at best,difficult to hear and place great strain on your amp and speakers etc.

I still have the Moss Group test CD which my brother blew up my technics HIFI 15 years ago using high pitch test tones.

Seriously, be carefull
post #118 of 120
WRT the "moss music group" test cd.

I use a full sine sweep, both channels 10-20k hz,

Oddly enough, i can hear quite high up the register (18k+) (Lowish volume!!!)

But the balance changes, in other words, both ears do not hear the same, and its quite wierd to hear the balance shift left and right on the sweep!!!!
post #119 of 120
Very high (and very low) frequencies are hard to reproduce. My soundcard (or possibly the headphones) attenuates very quickly after 17 khz and becomes impossible to hear at 18 khz (or maybe it was 18-19).

Unless you know your system can properly reproduce those frequency ranges, alot of these tests could be inconclusive.

When doing these tests I would set the sampling frequency as high as possile, as 44.1k will start to alias at 22k and produce incorrect results (ie. you'd be able to hear something above 22k because of lower frequency aliases). Also be mindful that almost no one can hear above 22k, and definitely not above 25k, so this might suggest a problem with your setup if you can hear 22k+.

Most headphones are not designed to hit 22k+ either, and I'm not sure how this works, but I'd venture a guess that some piece of hardware will not allow frequencies that high to pass through or the cans will distort or fail to respond (or damage).
post #120 of 120
16k, and i am only 19 yrs old!
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