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Frequency Test: How much can u hear?

post #1 of 120
Thread Starter 
Audio Signals and Test Tones. Playable online, free download. Tests your audio equipment, loudspeakers, room acoustics and hearing.




Hover your mouse over the circular icon .. the voice will tell u which frequency is being played.


Post the results of Highest Frequency u can hear.

i can hear 17khz max
post #2 of 120
My hearing cuts off at about 18.5kHz.* I am 25 years old. I take every possible precaution to protect my ears from loud noises. A certain amount of high-frequency loss will still happen naturally, but it shouldn't be drastic if I take care of myself.

*At normal listening levels. If I boost the volume, I can go to just below 20kHz.
post #3 of 120
i can hear at 18 and 19 K but not 17...huh?
post #4 of 120
I'm hearing 20k that's with 37 year old ears, my hearing certainly is rolled off on the top end but it's there.
post #5 of 120
I can hear 22kHz? This is not right. Is the sound suppose to be some kind of warbly thing (like a flash camera charging up) descending to high pitch sound.

This test is better

http://www.digital-recordings.com/he...ht_help_p.html
post #6 of 120
mine's at 18khz.. decent i suppose since im in the army and i've fired MG's and Assault Rifles sometimes without earplugs..
post #7 of 120
Everyone would do better with a calibrated sound source. Most headphones roll off at high frequencies, so the test is testing how ur amp, source, headphones and ears roll off.
post #8 of 120
14K is my upper limit. I'm 50, used to go duck hunting regularily for many years in the days when ear protection was not used, attended many rock concerts sans ear protection (didn't discover and enjoy ear plugs until I was in my 30s), and once lived in an art studio flanked by two roads with such noisy traffic, I blew the speaker on my tv while watching it at what I thought was moderate volume (I used to wake up on Sunday's perplexed by the silence as the traffic was much less on that day).

No wonder I like my Grado 325i so much!

Cheers!
post #9 of 120
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by b0dhi View Post
Everyone would do better with a calibrated sound source. Most headphones roll off at high frequencies, so the test is testing how ur amp, source, headphones and ears roll off.
Maybe thats why i couldnt hear 18khz ..

i am 20.. but my Headphones are plugged directly to soundcard.. no Amping or external DAC
post #10 of 120
Hi, you can't use this link too test you hearings upper limit, because you decide the volume, by increasing the volume you can compensating for you hear loss, and say you can hear 18-20 KHz.
This test cannot be compared with a real hearing test, at a doctor.

Regards,

Torben
post #11 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audio-Fi View Post
I can hear 22kHz? This is not right. Is the sound suppose to be some kind of warbly thing (like a flash camera charging up) descending to high pitch sound.

This test is better

Hearing Test Products
Same thing with me. I hear a clear, distinct and rather loud sound at 22kHz but then don't hear anything again until 17kHz.

The sound at 17kHz is a totally different sound, and it gets louder and louder at is drops to 16, 15, 14 and so on. In other words, I think this is the sound that I'm supposed to be hearing.

Strange that I hear such a different but equally loud sound at 22kHz.
post #12 of 120
When I start the test, it starts suspiciously down and I'm not sure my DAC on Juli@ does it correctly. It might be the aliasing issue the site mentions. It sounds like it's doing the sweep from low to high! The voice doesn't frankly match. Must be the alias thing but if I understood correctly and heard 'properly' the aliasingcheck-files there's no problem.
post #13 of 120
I hear 22khz =D yay.

Dave
post #14 of 120
For that test I fairly easily heard 22 kHz. I also tried the aliasing test, and my system passed. Testing myself with tones I generated with Audacity, I was able to hear up to 23 kHz, but nothing past that. At that point, I'm not sure if it's my ears or my equipment that's causing the roll-off. I'll just assume it's my ears.

Any sine wave above 15 kHz is brutal. Those are some really painful tones to listen to!!

BTW, aliasing works like this:

Let's say you have two sine waves: one at 2 kHz and the other at 4 kHz. The one at 4 kHz can sound exactly the same as the 2 kHz tone if aliasing is present. It's a bit hard to describe, but maybe this image will help.



Notice that there are two sine waves present, the red one and the blue one. Each have the exact same values where the dots are located. When you sample an analog signal to turn it into a digital signal, all you really are doing is taking several of these "dots" and using them to represent your original signal. Unfortunately, in doing this, two different signals can look identical. This is known as aliasing; one frequency appears exactly the same as another one. In this case, the blue sine wave is sampled correctly while the red one is sampled incorrectly. The red one will sound like the blue one.

The sampling rate for a CD is 44.1 kHz, which basically means that anything under 22.05 kHz will be sampled correctly, and anything above that will be aliased to another frequency below 22.05 kHz. This won't be a problem in audio recordings because anti-aliasing filters are used in order to basically attenuate anything above 22.05 kHz from the original signal.

If you heard a rising tone instead of a falling tone during the aliasing test, it means that your system is experiencing aliasing. For this test, a system that experiences aliasing will be representing higher frequencies as lower ones, and vice-versa.
post #15 of 120
A cooler and more recognizable example of aliasing you've probably seen several times, but may not have realized what was going on:

Have you ever been watching TV or a movie, and saw a car or bike going down the road, but the wheels looked like they were going backwards? That's another example of aliasing. An object spinning forward appears to be spinning backwards because of the framerate of the video.

Ain't science fun?
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