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Three different versions in which to save the files to my hard drive.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hello,
I just bought the new John Mellencamp — Life Death Love and Freedom CD.
It gives me three different versions in which to save the files to my hard drive.

MP3 (256 kbps)
AAC (256 kbps)
WAV(24/96)

Does anyone have a preference?

I am on a Dual 2.3 GHz PowerPC G5 Mac.
Memory: 4.5 GB

Thanks
post #2 of 9
WAV.

It is lossless and you can transcode it to other format later.
post #3 of 9
If it's a CD, why not 44.1/16 FLAC or ALAC (96/24 would mean the DVD side of a dual disc, wouldn't it?)?
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerbie View Post
If it's a CD, why not 44.1/16 FLAC or ALAC (96/24 would mean the DVD side of a dual disc, wouldn't it?)?
This CD comes in both DVD and CD format.

"John Mellencamp's 'Life, Death, Love and Freedom' album will be the first ever release in the ???? (CODE) format. T Bone Burnett and his team of engineers developed CODE, a proprietary audio technology that creates high-definition audio files that are virtually indistinguishable from the original master tapes. The resonance, warmth and presence that has been realized with CODE is unprecedented in the digital era. The CODE version of "Life, Death, Love and Freedom" is a DVD that will come packaged with a standard CD version of the album, available at all retail outlets, at no additional cost to the consumer. The CODE disc is playable on virtually all DVD machines including stand-alone players and drives integrated into computer systems. The DVD's content can be copied into most computer music software including iTunes and can, then, be downloaded onto personal music players such as the iPod. The standard CD is included to answer all possible compatibility questions. Mellencamp commented, "When T Bone introduced me to CODE, it was a remarkable experience. I could hear the music the way it was intended to be heard. I'm very happy the people are going to be able to share this experience in a way that's so true to our original intent."



http://www.starpulse.com/news/index....love_and_fr_15
post #5 of 9

woah, ramblin'!

Now, since we're in this forum...that's a bunch of marketing BS. Looks good, but ugh!
Quote:
“When T Bone introduced me to CODE, it was a remarkable experience. I could hear the music the way it was intended to be heard. I’m very happy the people are going to be able to share this experience in a way that’s so true to our original intent."
...which had nothing to do with this symbol-addled CODE thing. It's all been available since DVDs hit the shelves back in the 90s. You could do it without putting ΧΟΔΕ transfer software on the disc, and have the same audio stream coming out. Not that it is bad that DVD Video is being put to good use, with DVD Audio flopping, just that none of the audio-related comments/features have anything to do with this ΧΟΔΕ format over standard DVD. I don't see any info on whether there is some confidence of quality mastering built in to the use of the ΧΟΔΕ label (though it looks like that is the spirit of it, which is very very very cool, and I hope it will become common).

If you have a CD, too, then you do have the fourth, 44.1/16, option. iTunes should happily make ALACs, and between a new disc and iTunes' ECC turned on, it'll be nearly perfect (perfect, as defined by having every sample of even those seconds of complete digital silence that usually are part of the beginning and end of the album).

With 96/24 WAV from the DVD, though...I'd let the software do its thing, and maybe convert to FLAC or ALAC later (smaller, and you get tagging). If you want it lossy, too, then get them all. Even for 96/24 (about 3x CD), hard drive space isn't that expensive. Whether you hear a difference or not, 96/24 non-lossy makes for a good archive, and for DACs that don't do it, quality resampling and bit-depth reduction is available (I don't know how well OS X fares at sampling down, or if you'd need other software).

Finally, and more or less OT, having not heard of this before: $10/free shipping? Are the big four going to find something to sue Starbucks over to stop this, or what? I know I was just getting annoyed with market-speak and all, but while I wouldn't go for Mellencamp, this is exactly the dead horse us physical media lovers have been thwacking our clubs on for over a decade, now. If it's a good recording with good mastering (the real important bit), this is just what we've been wanting for ages ($15+ is still typical for new CD B&M, and Amazon typically isn't terribly lower, when I have a look, and I can be assured that most are compressed to hell and/or clipping).

Throw in some good transfers (if a mixed tape still exists in good shape) or good remasters of some Stax stuff (as it stands, looking for some can be a chaotic venture, sometimes), and I'll be practically inhaling ΧΟΔΕ packages...I might even visit Starbucks once or twice .
post #6 of 9
WAVfor sure.
Then later consider encoding to a lossless format to save space.
post #7 of 9
my m1710 laptop has 440 gb of hard drive [and 300 of that is in the cd drive hole as a second hard drive] but thats for everything so i vote mp3, its what all my musi is in, theres simply not enough room for anything bigger than mp3, its just wasted space [for me]

works in all mp3 players and is probably the most effiecient for space vs sound quality vs compatibility
post #8 of 9
WAV. If you don't' have too much music to fill up your HDD, then get WAV. That way you can re-encode it to whatever you want.
post #9 of 9
The WAV (24/96) for sure!
Since its not lossy compressed, and hence have the audio data intact.
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